Hydrogen Sludge Fuel and Motorrad Days canceled again for 2021

Figuring out better ways to fuel vehicles inevitably leads to a slew of challenges. These include energy density, distribution, storage, production cost, and end-consumer cost, to name just a few. Motorrad Days 2021 was originally scheduled to take place in July. Unfortunately for BMW fans, the event is simply not meant to be in 2021. As you might guess, the reason for 2021’s cancellation is the same as in 2020: the global coronavirus pandemic simply poses too much of a threat. AMERiders has the information on both the PowerPaste and Motorrad Days cancelation again for 2021.

Better fueling through chemistry.

PowerPaste

Figuring out better ways to fuel vehicles inevitably leads to a slew of challenges. These include energy density, distribution, storage, production cost, and end-consumer cost, to name just a few. What is practical and possible also varies widely based on the type of vehicle involved. While hydrogen fuel cells can work in passenger automobiles, for example, they’re hugely impractical for use in motorcycles and scooters.  

Enter the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM. Based in Dresden, Germany, the Institute recently announced a new product called PowerPaste. In photos, it looks a bit like a smooth spackle, or even squeezing certain acrylic paints out of tubes. That’s not a bad mental image to have, considering how Fraunhofer envisions distribution, but we’ll get to that after you know a little more about this fuel paste. 

To create PowerPaste, Fraunhofer says it takes magnesium powder, then mixes it with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride. A couple of stabilizers later, mix, mix, mix, and it’s the paste you now see before you. Fraunhofer says that this paste can be packed into a neat little cartridge, then squeezed out via a plunger as needed—not unlike a small caulk gun.  

From there, the PowerPaste mixes with the water you’re keeping in a separate tank to create hydrogen gas, a process which can be adjusted to fit the specific needs of your fuel cell. Now, for the really elegant part: Water, if you’re recall, contains hydrogen. Part of the reason that the PowerPaste method is so energy dense is because it gets half its hydrogen from that water.  

What about safety? PowerPaste can be stored quite safely at room temperature, and stays just fine even at high temperatures. In fact, Fraunhofer says it stays stable until it hits 250 degrees Celsius, which is 482 degrees Fahrenheit. That means parking your PowerPaste-using bike on a sunny summer day shouldn’t pose any particular fuel-related safety concerns. 

PowerPaste

Fraunhofer’s announcement goes on to address other pain points as well, such as infrastructure and distribution. If it’s packed and sold in cartridges, they’re portable, storable, and could easily be sold in shops. Grab your road snacks, some PowerPaste, and some more water and you’re good to go. Larger vehicles could simply pump the goop directly into their tanks, much like thick, gray, gasoline. Fraunhofer plans to start making up to four tons of PowerPaste per year in its own facility by the end of 2021, as a pilot program for additional study. 

Could a convenient, fossil fuel-free solution really be that simple? Not so fast. There are a number of additional questions and/or hurdles standing between us and a PowerPaste-powered future.  

For one, what happens to those empty cartridges after they’re spent? Backtracking a bit, how clean and energy-efficient is this paste to produce in the first place? Also, as Loz Blain at New Atlas asked, what happens to the magnesium after you combine the PowerPaste with water?  

Finally, while most people are probably used to new technologies costing a bit more on the introduction and then decreasing in price over time, will end-user costs be reasonable? It looks promising, but we’ll have to wait and see how it develops. 

From Motorrad to Motorsad

PowerPaste

Back in September 2020, BMW Motorrad announced that after 18 years near the factory in Munich, it was moving its 2021 BMW Motorrad Days festival to Berlin. That’s a major change and one that BMW was excited to make, especially since it would mark the 20th anniversary of Motorrad Days.  

Unfortunately for BMW fans, the event is simply not meant to be in 2021. BMW ended up cancelling Motorrad Days in 2020 due to the ongoing pandemic, and as of February 25, the 2021 Berlin event is canceled as well. As you might guess, the reason for 2021’s cancellation is the same as in 2020: the global coronavirus pandemic simply poses too much of a threat. Considering that around 40,000 people attended the previous Motorrad Days event, their math seems pretty sound.  

Motorrad Days 2021 was originally scheduled to take place in July. So, BMW Motorrad said it wanted to make this announcement as soon as possible since it knows that enthusiasts travel from all over the globe to be part of Motorrad Days. This way, it figured, people would have plenty of time to change their plans, instead of having to do so in a rush. 

For the moment, BMW plans to hold BMW Motorrad Days again in July 2022. In past years, the festival has held all the sights, sounds, and spectacles you’d expect from a big, outdoor moto festival. The fest is packed with rides, stunt shows, bikes, accessories suppliers, bike clubs, and of course, beer tents—after all, it is Germany.  

Now that we’re a year into the global pandemic, this information may not make anyone happy, but it no longer comes as any type of surprise. As vaccinations roll out, we have a cautious glimmer of hope that Motorrad Days and other 2022 events will return, better and more welcome than ever, for rider communities all over the world. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

PowerPaste

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Hydrogen Fuel or PowerPaste & Motorrad Days canceled again for 2021

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Harley-Davidson Pan America 2021 Has Been Revealed

The long wait is over the Harley-Davidson Pan America 2021 Has Been Revealed and AMERiders has the details, specs, and of course the skinny on this beauty for you!

The idea of an adventure Harley first surfaced in 2018, when the Motor Company unveiled its More Roads to Harley strategy. In an attempt to make the brand more appealing to a broader, younger audience, the company announced it would get out of its niche and enter new segments. The plan notably included developing small (250 to 500cc) and mid-size (500 to 1,250cc) new platforms, branching out into new segments, and launching the long-awaited LiveWire. 

Pan America 2021

That’s when we first met the Pan America—Harley’s upcoming new champion in the adventure bike ring. At the time, the company’s goal was to introduce the bike in 2020, however, things didn’t exactly go as planned. Former CEO Levatich got sacked in February 2020, and his ambitious strategy was entirely scrapped by the new management, replaced with the aggressively more conservative Hardwire strategy.

Under new president and CEO Jochen Zeitz’s lead, Harley considerably cut back on the number of new models in its pipeline and only two out of the lot made the cut: an unnamed 1250 power cruiser and the Pan America. A little over a year after it was formally introduced at EICMA 2019, the all-new 2021 Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 is finally here. By the looks of it, Harley did its homework and gives us a bike we can really be excited about.  

Pricing

Harley’s shiny new adventurer is offered in two trim levels. The base one starts at $17,139 and is available in your choice of Silver Rock Gray or Vivid Black colorways. The higher trim level, dubbed Pan America 1250 Special, starts at $19,999 and is offered with four livery options: River Rock Dark Gray, Vivid Black, Deadwood Green, and Baja Orange & Stone Washed White Pearl (which is the color scheme we’ve been seeing for the past year). 

The Special trim level adds a few adventure-oriented perks to the menu of features, including a center stand, a multi-position rear brake pedal that can be adjusted to the riding position (standing or seated), a steering damper, a skid plate, a brush guard, heated grips, handguards, an adaptive headlight, a tire pressure monitoring system, and semi-active front and rear suspension with vehicle load control. The suspension at the back is electronically controlled and comes with five settings for added or reduced stiffness. 

Like with any other bike in the lineup, Harley offers a vast collection of accessories for the Pan Am including different sets of luggage. The Special can also receive optional features includes wire-spoke wheels with tubeless tires and adaptive ride height.

Pricing looks about right for the segment. Comparatively, the BMW R 1250 GS sets you back $17,995, the Ducati Multistrada V4; $19,995, and the KTM 1290 Super Adventure S; $18,599. The new Harley Pan America 1250 is going to be available in Spring 2021. 

Specs

Engine

When it showed the bike in the metal for the first time in 2019, Harley-Davidson also confirmed the introduction of a new family of engines, dubbed Revolution Max. At the time, the 60-degree, liquid-cooled twin was going to be available in two sizes: 975cc and 1,252cc.

While it’s unclear whether we’ll get the smaller variant at all as it was meant to launch with the Bronx—a model that seemingly didn’t make it into Harley’s new corporate strategy—the bigger version is the one we find at the core of the new Pan Am.

The company explains that the cylinders’ angle helps keep the block compact while also leaving enough space to fit the block with dual downdraft throttle bodies designed to maximize the air intake which results in improved performance.

The new 1,252cc V-twin has a bore and stroke of 105mm x 72mm and a compression ratio of 13:1. Its output is rated at 150 horsepower at 9,000rpm and 94 lb-ft of torque at 6,750rpm. The use of a dual-overhead-cam (DOHC) allows the engine to rev higher and to receive Variable Valve Timing (VVT) on the intake and exhaust cams which, Harley says, broadens the powerband, improves torque efficiency, and “may” improve fuel efficiency.

The engine is paired with a six-speed transmission with clutch assist and slipper functions to make the pull lighter and keep the engine from over-revving. 

If you like all the tech talk that pertains to the new Revolution Max engine, check out Harley’s thorough breakdown of all the features

Chassis and Dimensions

The new Pan Am is built on what Harley calls an optimized chassis that uses the engine as a stressed member and is designed to provide improved stiffness and handling without raking pounds in.

Speaking of weight, we like the numbers we see. We commented before that while weight normally isn’t much of a concern for Harley, we were hoping that the new Pan Am was going to tip the scales below the 600-pound mark. Mission accomplished, folks: the base model weighs in at a reasonable 534 pounds wet while the top-of-the-line Special clocks in at 559 pounds. Whew, that’s relieving. That’s actually lighter than the BMW R 1250 GS that weighs in at 549 pounds wet for the base model if you can believe it. The Ducati Multistrada V4 and KTM 1290 Super Adventure R are rated at 478 pounds but that’s without all the required fluids.

In terms of ergonomics, the Pan Am offers a typical adventure bike setting with an unladen saddle height of 34.2 inches in the low setting and 35.2 inches in the high setting. On the 1250 Special, the unladen seat height is set at 33.4 inches in the low setting and 34.4 inches in the high one. To adapt the wind protection to the type of riding, the windscreen can be adjusted four ways.  

It also gets a cavernous 5.6-gallon tank, designed with the filler opening shifted forward so that riders can fill up without having to remove their tank bag. 

Brakes and Suspension

The frame is supported by a Showa, 47mm inverted fork with 7.48 inches of travel at the front and a Showa shock with piggyback reservoir with adjustable hydraulic preload and 7.48 inches of travel, paired with an aluminum swingarm.

The bike is fitted with a set of asymmetrical cast aluminum wheels—19 inches at the front and 17 inches at the back. As for the tires, the company reached out to Michelin to develop co-branded tires designed to provide the optimal feel and grip for the bike’s adventure purpose. The Pan Am comes with a pair of standard Michelin Scorcher Adventure while the Michelin Anakee Wild knobby tires are available in option.  

Harley worked in collaboration with Brembo to design a special set of four-piston calipers that fits the look of the Pan with “sharper edges and softer curves”. The front wheel is fitted with a pair of 320mm discs while the rear wheel gets a single 280mm disc. 

Techs

Behind the windscreen, the Pan America receives a 6.8-inch TFT touchscreen covered in non-reflective glass to make the screen easy to read at all times. The touchscreen function automatically shuts off while the vehicle is in motion, giving the rider the option to navigate through the menu using the handlebar-mounted controls. The system can be paired with the rider’s smartphone via Apple CarPlay and Android Auto which enables calls and message management as well as navigation. 

The base model also comes with five rider modes (Road, Sport, Rain, Off-Road, and Off-Road Plus) which adapt the bike’s power delivery, engine braking, cornering ABS, and cornering traction control to the rider’s immediate needs. It also comes with standard cruise control. 

Here is the Harley-Davidson Pan America 2021 Global Reveal video and some pictures to get your motor running.

Harley-Davidson Pan America 2021 Gallery

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Harley-Davidson Pan America 2021 specs, details, and more.

And, Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Sportsters We Are Going to Be Saying a Fond Farewell To.

“Growing old sucks” is a phrase we often hear as we grow older. More often than not it is because we have to say farewell to something or someone we have become attached or close to. Well, we at AMERiders have some sad news on some Sportsters for you that we must say a fond farewell to.

It can be one of the hardest things you do as you grow old is to see all your friends, family, loved ones and, acquaintances, die off. It also can be upsetting when it happens “in a way” to some of the motorcycles we’ve grown up with and loved. Unlike discontinued humans, at least these motorcycles will still be around for years, and some will even be great bargains. But once the dealers sell them all, that will be that. For some of them, it’s good riddance; for others, we may have to shed a little tear… But, you know there will always be other exciting new bikes sprouting up to replace them. It’s the circle, the circle of life.

Harley-Davidson Sportster

sportster

Harley built the first one in 1957, so the Sportster’s got to be one of the oldest bikes out there in continuous production. Harley’s been of course  upgrading the bike forever, and they must have produced around 5000 versions over these past 64 years – only a slight exaggeration. Most Sportsters are probably still blatting around, since these  probably have more aftermarket support than any bike on the planet. The 2021 Iron 1200 (pictured, $9,999)is among the last of the Mohicans, and after it and the Iron 883 and Forty-Eight are done, that’s it for the Sporty. But you know H-D’s got something up its sleeve to fill the gap. 

Also defunct after they’re all sold out: Street 500Street 750, and Street Rod. The Streets were produced beginning in 2014, but failed to gain traction in the marketplace.

Yamaha R6 and VMAX

sportster

The outlandish Yamaha VMAX, first introduced as the V-Max in 1985 before getting a big overhaul in 2009 that made it so bombastic its name became ALL CAPS, is finally seeing the end of the line. The OG power cruiser, the VMAX’s anime-like styling was a shock to the system in 1985, and its 1197cc V-four engine – and later the 1679cc redesigned version – was revered for its ability to rip your arms off while making excellent dragstrip sounds. The original Max came with a feature called V-Boost that imitates turbo boost by opening butterfly valves at high rpm to send a rush of fresh mixture to the combustion chambers.

sportster

The going-away of the YZF-R6 Sportster is another one that has us asking not for whom the bell tolls: It’s us geezers. Always a contender in the 600 supersport wars since its inception in 1999, and right through its radically racy 2008 redesign, it’s fitting that Yamaha will still be selling the leftovers for offroad use only, as the R6 Race.

Also leaving the building after 2021: the WR250R dual-sport and SMAX scooter. 

Ducati Monsters, Great and Small

Well, there is an all-new Monster with the 937 liquid-cooled L-Twin, but the monstrous Monster 1200 is already gone, and now the Monster 797 joins it in the family crypt. The 797 will be most missable, because it was the most direct descendant of the original air-cooled M900 Monster of 1994. Also MIA in the new Monster is that iconic steel trellis frame that was for decades a Ducati hallmark. Thankfully, you can still get an elemental air-cooled Ducati in the form of the 803cc Scrambler Nightshift. 

sportster

The light and powerful 690 Duke single was a fave, until it was superseded by the 790 Duke twin just two model years ago… now both have ridden to the top of the ash heap of history. Almost. The 790 Duke remains in the line-up as a 2020 model. And you can still get an awesome and powerful 690 LC4 single, but now  housed only in the 690 Enduro R, or the SMC R pictured. The mourning period will be mercifully short for the Dukes, given how good the new 890 Duke and Adventures are, and how rapid is the pace of development in Mattighofen.

Who’s Next?

These are the ones we’ll miss most, but once again, fresh green shoots are already sprouting up to take their place. Across the pond, where the ability to adapt to Euro 5 standards is critical to survival, bikes on the chopping block there, that probably will be in the same situation here in the US shortly thereafter, include the Yamaha Super Ténéré: The FJR1300 sport tourer is already gone from European markets.

Various Euro sites are also reporting that Honda won’t be bringing any of its V-four bikes up to Euro5 spec – no more VFR800F, VFR800X Crossrunner or VFR1200X Crossrunner for Europe. For the USA, no great loss, as the Honda VFR1200X Sportster is the only one American Honda sells, and none too successfully. 

sportster

May they rest in peace. Or in pieces, on eBay. On a positive note, though Euro 5 bikes are of course cleaner than ever, nearly all the ones we’ve ridden run better, smoother, and just as powerfully as ever.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

sportsters

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Sportsters We Are Going to Be Saying a Fond Farewell To.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Ducati honors Lamborghini with the stunning Ducati Diavel 1260

In November last year, Italian bike maker Ducati broke the mold when it pulled the wraps off a Diavel variant meant to honor parent company Lamborghini. We’re talking about a limited production run the likes of which not all of us will get to see in the metal, let alone experience first hand. Thank God for Youtube, then, and rich bloggers. AMERiders, shows you the awesomely stunning bike.

Ducati said there would be just 630 of these incredible machines made, priced a hell of a lot more than the most potent Diavel in the regular range, at $31,995. Then again, one can’t expect to use premium and pay standard…

It would seem deliveries of the two-wheeler have already begun. Below is a video posted a few days ago by the Supercars of London Youtube channel, whose owner steps out of a Nissan GT-R (he makes sure to mention this every chance he gets) to take possession of the two-wheeler in Cambridge.

And we must say, the thing is breathtaking in real life, perhaps even more so than in the press photos released last year. Sadly, we don’t get to see it on the move and hear it roar.

This Diavel was made to replicate some of the design elements featured on the Lamborghini Sian FKP 37. It sports wheels meant to remind one of those on the car, carbon fiber used extensively on the air intakes, radiator covers, and central tank cover, among others, plus, of course, the signature paint of the Lambo.

The bike weighs 220 kg (485 pounds) and gets its forward motion from a 1,262cc Testastretta DVT engine rated at 162 hp at 9,500 rpm and 129 Nm (95 lb-ft) at 7,500 rpm.

Another nod to the Sian is the number of bikes that will be made. Lambo pledged to produce 63 Sian supercars, but that was a small number when it comes to motorcycles, so Ducati went for 630 instead.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

AMERiders shows you how Ducati honored Lamborghini with the stunning Ducati Diavel 1260

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

NLC’s Harley-Davidson Darkside Boasts 5k in Custom Parts and Brakes

As we journeyed through the world of custom bikes this past year, we realized there’s pretty much nothing a Harley-Davidson owner really rules out when it comes to their ride. Today’s treat comes from Germany, of course, from a shop called No Limit Custom Manufaktur (NLC). It is called, in this modified form, Darkside, and started life as a Breakout, the model its maker describes as being capable of “turning stoplights into drag strips.” AMERiders gives you the lowdown.

The Darkside is a fast machine by all accounts, powered by the 114 Milwaukee-Eight engine good for 155 Nm (114 lb-ft), and brought to a halt by brakes rocking a 4-piston setup at the front and a 2-piston one at the rear.

For some reason, someone at NLC decided the engine is powerful enough, but the breaks aren’t. So the Breakout was taken to the shop and gifted with 320 mm brake discs and 6-piston brake calipers front and rear. All, the garage says, as a means to deliver a brutal stop.

The impressive hardware is worth a combined €2,500 ($3,000), which is more than half the price of all the parts that went into making this build, including the new rear and front fenders, engine spoiler, and other minor touches.

As for how the thing looks, the name says it all. We have a darkened appearance coming from the many black elements of the motorcycles, but also a touch of contrast given by the aluminum coating deployed here and there and the welded-look exhaust system.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on NLC’s Harley-Davidson Darkside Boasts 5k in Custom Parts and Brakes.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

NLC Custom Shop Builds a Harley-Davidson V-Rod Named Camarena

By design, Harley-Davidson motorcycles are made to be customized. Everyone knows this, including the company itself, which is doing its best to encourage projects based on its products. Most of the time, these projects have something truly spectacular about them, but there are cases when they’re simply… strange, to say the least. You all know how we at AMERiders like to bring you interesting builds from interesting custom shops. So we are bringing you one called Camarena, from a German shop called No Limit Custom (NLC).

It was an ordinary V-Rod if there ever was such a thing. Now, the two-wheeler is bleeding red through all its pores, be it of Harley’s design or the shop’s own making.

It may not look like it, but there are around $22,000-worth of extra parts fitted on the thing (or €18,000, because it comes from Europe), and that does not include the eye-popping red used everywhere. And we really mean everywhere, including the place tuners usually don’t go painting: the engine.

Technically speaking, these guys didn’t touch the engine either, except for fitting it with a low exit exhaust system. The red you see on the Camarena is actually sprayed on a 3D engine cover, milled from a full block of aluminum. But it is not the only place where it was used.

Red is extensively deployed on pretty much every part of the bike, from the front fender to the rear one and sideways across the fuel tank. By the way, the latter is a slightly smaller piece than stock, at just 11 liters. The modification was required by the changes made up front, where the shocks were tucked under the bike, and a new front fork was fitted.

Important to note is that if you fancy the parts, you don’t actually have to go for the same paint job. This is custom, after all, and the client’s desire is the law.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the NLC Custom Shop Builds a Harley-Davidson V-Rod Named Camarena.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

The List of Fastest Motorcycles in the World for 2021

In a world of super-fast automobiles, airplanes, and boats, it’s only proper to acknowledge the eminence and popularity of super-fast motorcycles too. To own or ride a super-fast motorcycle may be one of your dreams. The question is if you have enough money in your pocket, which motorcycle would you buy? The fastest one. Right? We at AMERiders decided that it was time for our list of fastest motorcycles in the world for 2021. 

Motorcycles don’t often get the credits they deserve and they somewhat get overlooked in the tech world too – this is in comparison to how much love and innovation cars receive on a regular basis. That being said, motorcycles (also referred to as motorbike or bike) are just as useful and important as the other modes of transportation. In fact, to some people, motorcycles are deemed better because they can effortlessly go through (and to) places where cars won’t dare go to. Bikers in many cities across the globe can reach their destinations much faster than cars.

10. MV Agusta F4 1000R (180.8 MPH)

2021

With a 998 CC four-cylinder, 4-stroke, 16-valve engine that produces a maximum power of 195 hp and 110.8 Nm maximum torque with a top speed of 180.8 mph (291 km/h) in the process, the latest MV Agusta F4 1000R starts off the world’s fastest bikes list. A modern classic straight out of Italy, the MV Agusta F4 1000R sports bike most certainly sets some type of standards as far sports motorcycling is concerned, with an impressive performance and design.

9. Yamaha YZF-R1 (185.7 MPH)

2021

Coming right behind the MV Agusta F4 1000R, is the Yamaha YZF-R1 which gives you that MotoGP feel. Another exhilarating thing about this motorbike is that it is a street-legal bike, despite the amazing speed which is MotoGP-rated. The sport bike sprints from 0-60 mph in an incredible 2.6 seconds with a top speed of 185.7 mph (299 km/h), and it boasts a top maximum power of 200 horsepower which is produced from a 998 CC, liquid-cooled, 16-valve, DOHC, in-line four-cylinder engine. The Yamaha YZF R1 is an absolute beast.

8. Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14R (186 MPH)

2021

The Kawasaki brand is renowned for its superfast high-performance motorbikes, hence this entry shouldn’t come as a surprise. The Kawasaki Ninja is powered by a 1441 CC four-valve liquid-cooled engine which pumps out 197 horsepower and a maximum torque of 158 Nm, and it can accelerate from 0-60 mph in 2.5 seconds, with a top speed of 186 mph (299 km/h).

7. MV Agusta F4 RC (187.7 MPH)

This version of MV Agusta is labeled street-legal and its four-cylindered engine is a pure beast as it produces an impressive 212 horsepower and 115 Nm of maximum torque. This motorcycle can sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 2.4 seconds, and it is one of the fastest Italian’s motorbikes till date with a top speed of 187.65 mph (302 km/h).

6. BMW S1000RR (188 MPH)

2021

BMW is well-esteemed for always putting out nothing but the best, and that is exactly what the  German brand has done with the 2020 BMW S 1000 RR which till date, is one of the fastest bike the brand has ever produced. The sport bike features a newly-introduced 999 CC liquid-cooled, 4-stroke in-line 4-cylinder engine which produces 205 horsepower and 113 Nm of torque, achieving that 0-60 acceleration feat in just 2.6 seconds. This powerful sport bike also boast a top speed of 188 mph (303 km/h).

5. Honda CBR1100XX Super Blackbird (190 MPH)

The Honda CBR1100XX Super Blackbird features a 1137 CC liquid-cooled inline-4 engine that delivers 152 hp, thereby hitting a top speed of 190 mph (306 km/h), making it the fastest motorbike Honda ever produced till date. The motorcycle once held the title of the fastest motorcycle in 1997, defeating the Kawasaki ZK-11. It features the twin balance shaft which helps the bike achieve exceptional smoothness.

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade (191.4 MPH)

4. Suzuki Hayabusa (193.8 MPH)

2021

This superfast bike features a 1340 CC, four-stroke, DOHC, 4-cylinder 16-valve engine that produces out a whooping 197 hp and 115 Nm of maximum torque, with a top speed that’s recorded 193.8 mph (312 km/h). The Suzuki Hayabusa is still Suzuki’s fastest superbike till this moment and it is named after the Peregrine Falcon – the fastest bird in the world which has a top speed of 203 mph. The bike features Idle Speed Control System that helps engine stabilize in different conditions, allowing it to sprint from 0-60 mph in 2.5 seconds. It also features advanced fuel injection system from Suzuki for high combustion efficiency.

3. MTT Y2K Turbine Superbike (226.8 MPH)

Officially known as the MTT Y2K Turbine Motorcycle, this pretty boy is one of the most powerful production sport bikes ever manufactured. Although not not mass produced in continuous series, each Y2K Turbine Superbike is uniquely hand made to order after receiving the buyer’s specifications. The bike is powered by a Rolls-Royce 250-C18 turboshaft engine with a 2-speed semi-automatic transmission, which cranks out 320 horsepower and a maximum torque of 425 lb-ft. The MTT Y2K Turbine Superbike can go from 0-60 mph in just 2.5 seconds, with a top speed of 226.8 mph (365 km/h).

2. Kawasaki Ninja H2R (248.5 MPH)

The Kawasaki Ninja H2R is the world’s fastest street legal motorcycle you can easily get your hands on in 2021. With a 998 cc supercharged DOHC inline-4 engine that cranks out a whooping 310 hp, the 2021 Kawasaki Ninja H2R can hit an estimated top speed of 248.5 mph (400 km/h) which is an unbelievable feat for a motorbike. The Kawasaki Ninja H2R is clearly faster than some supercars, with its 6-speed dog-ring transmission, and a maximum torque of 156 Nm. The superbike features 250mm single disc with opposed 2 piston calipers as rear brakes and 2 x 330mm dual-semi floating, radial mount discs with four-piston calipers of front brakes. The 2021 Kawasaki Ninja H2R is indeed a force to reckon with considering the fact that it can also accelerate from 0-60 mph in an unbelievable 2.5 seconds.

1. Dodge Tomahawk (350 MPH)

The Dodge brand is very well known for its high performance engines and vehicles, so it shouldn’t exactly surprise anyone why the Tomahawk is sitting on our number one spot. The Dodge Tomahawk is the fastest and most powerful motorbike ever produced, and no other motorcycle has been able to top its performance so far. The Dodge Tomahawk features a 8.3 liter, V-10 SRT 10 Dodge Viper engine with a 2-speed manual transmission which cranks out an insane 500 horsepower and a maximum torque of 525 pound-feet. This four-wheeled monster can go from 0 to 60 mph in just 2.5 seconds with a surreal top speed of 350 mph (563 km/h). Only nine units of the Tomahawk was produced between 2003 and 2006, so it won’t be an easy job at all to get your hands on one in 2021.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with A List of Fastest Motorcycles in the World for 2021.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Motorcycle Hand Signals You Should Know and the Biker Wave History.

To wave or not to wave that is the question, now isn’t it. The biker wave has been around for a long time. Some Bikers do it and some don’t, is it part of motorcycle hand signals that everyone should know? My husband and I do the motorcycle wave and we believe it is a courtesy to any biker no matter what they are riding including a moped, or e-bike, or brand. AMERiders gives you the History on the Biker Wave and lets you know the Motorcycle Hand Signals you should know. I think after 2020 we all should be showing each other some biker wave love.

motorcycle hand signals

To wave or not to wave at other riders when riding your bike: that is the (very modern) question. Some riders like to wave at each other, while others prefer to nod. Additional riders may choose to keep on going and never acknowledging you at all. Ask any number of riders what they think, and you’ll probably get just as many answers as the total number of riders you ask.  

I don’t think my husband and I have not ever done the biker wave unless it’s has been unsafe to do so. IE, he’s been too busy clutching, for example, he’ll simply offer a nod instead, I however throwout the wave for us unless he needs me to be a bit still. I like acknowledging other riders out on the road, no matter what they’re riding. That’s my personal preference, and you may feel differently, and you’re also more than welcome to your own opinions on the matter. But where did the wave come from in the first place? 

Ride for any amount of time, and you’re extremely likely to hear the misty Harley-Davidson origin story for all motorcycle waving habits everywhere. That’s one possible origin story, as Gastro Racing explores in this video.

However, the video also acknowledges that as two-wheeled, motorized conveyances began to pop up all over the planet, they also did so in a variety of cultures. Did a wave of Honda-induced friendliness really kickstart the moto-wave later on? 

The thing is, while some cultures were major participants in World War II, others weren’t. Also important is the fact that while some drive on the right-hand side of the road, others drive on the left. Thus, road behavior among motorcyclists and car users evolved differently, as well.

That’s why our own Jacob Black wrote about his preference to nod, rather than wave—after all, he grew up riding in Australia. Riding is a bit different there it is in the U.S. or Canada. That’s not necessarily good or bad, but it is a factor. 

This video leans heavily on U.S. cultural touchstones and motorcycle culture to make the argument that the bike wave became such a major thing due to ‘60s and ‘70s hippie influences. While America definitely has had and continues to have its own bike culture and various sub-cultures, there are also many more riders and bike cultures in the world outside American borders.  

Places with big commuter bike cultures, for example, are far less likely to also have waving as an ingrained bike reflex. I mean, would you want to basically stand around waving at every single person throughout your entire commute in stop-and-go traffic? Probably not. 

Basic Motorcycle Hand Signals

There are also some Basic Motorcycle hand signals that every biker should know even before they hit the road for their first ride we have culminated them below for you.

motorcycle hand signals

Motorcycle Hand signals, do you know them? They’re an important part of what every biker should learn before riding, but very few riders remember what they are and what they’re for. In many places, motorcycle hand signals are part of the learner rider course but even those who’ve taken and passed the required courses and quickly forgot exactly what arm goes where when they’re out on the road.

But why are they important? Why do we as riders need to know this stuff?

Since modern motorcycles are equipped with tons of modern technology it seems like learning how to use your arms to signal your intent is a bit of an outdated skill. Even though technology has come on leaps and bounds over the past 100 years, and the build-quality of all road-legal motorcycles can be heavily relied upon, technology can fail, things do break down. Your signals could become damaged and if you’re unable to signal your intent to other road users you could cause an accident. Even if your signals work, signaling your intent with your arms can be a better indicator of your plans, particularly when you’re being followed or are leading a riding group. Knowing how to correctly employ motorcycle hand signals helps keep everyone on the road safe.

We’d just like to mention that all of these signals are performed with the left arm and left hand. The reason for this should be fairly obvious but just in case here’s why. The right hand is responsible for front braking and throttle control, it’s very important that riders keep this hand firmly in place. By removing your hand from the throttle without a throttle-stop of cruise control, your motorcycle will begin to engine-brake, which isn’t ideal in this situation, and it’s also nice to have a hand spare to cover the front brake in case of an emergency. 

I hope that the video and the Biker hand signals image we found have helped you understand what motorcycle hand signals we use out on the road and why.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Motorcycle Hand Signals You Should Know and the Biker Wave History.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Harley-Davidson Reduces Street Category Down to Three Models

Harley-Davidson has been taking some pretty drastic measures lately to secure its spot on the market. On January 20, 2021, we discovered the extent of those measures when the Motor Company confirmed its upcoming lineup. While the digital event focused mainly on what’s new and exciting in the Harley showrooms, it also marked the end of the road for some well-known models that quietly disappeared from the maker’s website.  AMERiders gives you the skinny.

In the “Street” category, the Sportster lineup was reduced down to only three models with the Iron 883 and 1200 and the Forty-Eight left to hold the entry-level fort. The beginner-friendly Street 500 and 750 have been officially discontinued, putting an end to Harley’s small-and-medium-displacement era.   

The H-D Street 500 and 750 were first announced in 2013. The company already knew back then that it needed to go after a younger demographic and expand its presence in markets where smaller displacements thrived. Those are the boxes Harley was hoping to check with the new Streets.   

street

At the time, former CEO Matt Levatich explained that the new Street lineup “fills a need for people who want to identify with a brand but have a motorcycle that is less intimidating, and more inviting. This bike is easier to ride and easier to learn how to ride.”  

Armed with a new frame, the then-new Revolution X engine, and a small price tag (the 500 started at $6,700 back in the day), the Streets seemed to have all the makings of good starter bikes. They also made getting on a Harley far more accessible to a wider range of riders. 

The models received mixed reviews with some praising their simplicity and accessibility while others criticized their lack of personality. Ultimately, the Streets, in particular the 500, turned out to be prized by riding school thanks to their docile nature and approachable stature. 

Back in September 2020, Harley’s French branch confirmed that the Sportsters wouldn’t be updated to Euro 5 standards and that it would therefore be pulled from the European lineup for 2021. We already had a feeling the decision would have a trickle effect on the U.S. lineup. Granted, some of the Sportsters remain, but for how long? There is already talk of a replacement platform.   

So, what now? We reached out to Harley to inquire about potential replacements for the Streets.  As things currently stand, the role of “the entry-level” bike is now bestowed on the not-so-entry-level Iron 883.  Our contact answered that the company will continue to supply Street 500s to H-D Riding Academy dealers for training, but declined to comment about any future models.

We suspect the entry-level spots won’t be left empty for too long. Though the brand’s presence in Asia has been greatly reduced in 2020, the market for small and mid-size bikes remains prominent, especially at a time when people are looking for new, socially-distanced ways to commute. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

street

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information as Harley-Davidson Reduces Street Category Down to Three Models.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Harley Davidson 2021 Lineup Softail, Touring, and CVO Is Confirmed

If you’re a Harley Davidson fan and you’ve been eagerly awaiting all the info on the 2021 model lineup, today is your day. For the new year, the Motor Company bumped the Street Bob up to 114 status, restyled the Fat Boy 114, and introduced a new Rockford Fosgate-powered audio system on the 2021 CVO Street Glide and CVO Road Glide. Of course, there are plenty of new styling elements throughout the line to add seasoning to the soup. AMERiders gives you a look at the list of these beauties. 

First, the 2021 Street Bob 114. This is the lightest-weight Softail model, according to the MoCo. It’s powered by a Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine, which makes 119 ft-lbs of torque at 3,000 rpm. As a Softail, it boasts that rear underseat monoshock with an on-shock preload adjuster. It also boasts two-up seating and pegs as well, a dual bending valve front suspension, LED headlamp, digital instrumentation, a USB charging port, keyless ignition, and a security system as standard.

Styling elements include black and chrome elements where you want them. Chopped fenders, mini-ape handlebars, black steel laced wheels, and a blacked-out engine with pushrod tubes in bright chrome as an accent. Available colors include Vivid Black, Stone Washed White Pearl, Baja Orange, or Deadwood Green.  

For the 2021 Fat Boy 114, the Motor Company switched chrome finishes to offer a different look for the new year. Instead of satin chrome everything, you now get bright chrome everything. That includes the engine covers, exhaust, front end details including the headlight nacelle, fork covers, and riser, rear fender struts, tank console, and Ventilator air cleaner cover. The Fat Boy wouldn’t be the Fat Boy without wearing massive rubber, so its solid aluminum 18-inch Lakester wheels get a 160mm and 240mm set of Michelin Scorcher tires. Harley also trimmed both the front and rear fenders to make those extra thick tires really stand out. Available colors include Vivid Black, Black Jack Metallic, Deadwood Green, or a two-tone Gauntlet Gray Metallic paired with Vivid Black.  

Over on the Touring side, the hot rod bagger trio gets a brand-new low profile engine guard to help emphasize their slammed-ness. Both the Street Glide Special and Road Glide Special get new two-tone paint schemes for 2021, as well as your choice of either blacked-out or bright chrome accents. The Road King Special and Street Glide Special both get Harley’s new Daymaker LED headlamp, as well.  

Gallery: 2021 Harley-Davidson CVO, Touring, and Softail Lineup

If you’re thinking of moving up to a CVO for 2021, both the CVO Street Glide and CVO Road Glide models get a brand-new Harley-Davidson Audio powered by Rockford Fosgate system developed specifically for the Motor Company’s machines. Also, if you’re interested in retrofitting this system to your existing CVO, Harley will be selling components as accessories for your 2014 and later Touring model equipped with the Boom! Box infotainment system.  

CVOs also get a new 21-inch front and 18-inch rear wheel combo for 2021, featuring a cast-aluminum rim, laced spokes, and a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS). An LED console light, new instrument faces, and new standard-length saddlebags (which replace the extended-length saddlebags previously found on the outgoing models) also come standard. Available two-tone paint options include Sunset Orange Fade and Sunset Black with satin chrome accents, Black Hole with gloss black and black onyx finishes, or Bronze Armor with smoked satin and gloss black finishes.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Harley Davidson 2021 Lineup

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Harley Davidson 2021 Lineup Softail, Touring, and CVO Is Confirmed.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.