Look Twice Save a Life May is Motorcycle Awareness Month

Look Twice Save a Life isn’t just a saying it is important to remember especially since May is Motorcycle Awareness Month. We here at AMERiders life by that saying and hope you will too. With warmer weather, it’s time to remind everyone to be on the alert and to share the road with motorcyclists. Riders who have been cooped up all winter are excited to be out on the road again, but that shouldn’t stop them from using caution.

Both motorcyclists and motorists need to be aware of their surroundings. Checking blind spots, mirrors and using turn signals are necessary when changing lanes and when passing.

Distracted driving has been on the rise, too. Distractions during driving could mean the difference between seeing a motorcyclist or not when preparing to change lanes.  Don’t let one text change anyone’s life forever!

Riders need to take precautions as well. Take a defensive driving course, wear protective gear and keep your bike in its best working condition. Also, be aware of any road hazards and dangerous weather conditions.

Motorcyclists have the same rights and privileges as any other motor vehicle operator on our roads. Our three major campaigns include:

  • Motorist Awareness of Motorcycles, focusing on  helping motorists understand standard motorcycle driving behaviors and to learn how to drive safely around motorcycles on our roadways.
  • Rider Safety, focusing on the ways that motorcyclists can increase their riding safety.
  • Share the Road, focusing on promoting motorcyclist awareness and safety to both motorcycle riders and motor vehicle drivers.

We as motorcyclists are much more vulnerable to crashes than other drivers. In 2007, the mileage death rate for motorcyclists in 2007 was 37 times greater than for passenger car occupants. Motorcycle safety also is an issue of increasing concern – fatalities involving drivers and motorcyclists increased 131 percent between 1998 and 2008, according to NSC.

Throughout Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, NSC encourages motorists to share the road with motorcyclists and be extra alert when they are nearby. NSC’s tips include:

1. Passenger car drivers must allow greater following distance behind a motorcycle.
2. Drivers also must show extra caution in intersections. Most crashes occur when a driver fails to see a motorcyclist and turns left in front of a motorcycle.
3. Drivers should never try to share a lane with a motorcycle. Always give a motorcycle the full lane width.
4. Motorcyclists should avoid riding in poor weather conditions.
5. Motorcyclists should position their motorcycles to avoid a driver’s blind spot.
6. Motorcyclists must use turn signals for every turn or lane change.

AMERiders wants to encourage all of our readers to pass along this information plus encourage all our fellow riders and cagers to…

look twice save a life

Most of all, everyone please enjoy your ride and make it home again!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

AMERiders encourages you to Look Twice Save a Life May is Motorcycle Awareness Month.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Global Pandemic Continues to Rage on Effecting Moto-Industry and More

Since the global pandemic took hold in 2020, we’ve learned a few things. One, motorcycles and scooters are a pretty great way to get around while keeping your distance from other people. Two, different geographic areas go through different viral surges at different times. Just because it’s not that bad wherever you are doesn’t mean that it’s not terrible somewhere else. Three, circumstances can and do change. For example, vaccine rollouts in the U.S. got off to a rocky start, but as of April 22, 2021, about 41 percent of U.S. adults have received at least one dose.  While the global pandemic rages on, however, it is not just the moto-industry that is being affected it is much more, AMERiders has your information.

We’ve seen COVID cases rise and hospitals get overwhelmed in waves, across multiple countries. The U.S., Brazil, Italy, the U.K., France, and Japan all immediately come to mind. In April, 2021, India is currently in the grips of the world’s largest surge. Hospitals and private citizens alike have been taking to social media to plead for oxygen, which is in extremely short supply. If you’ve seen international news in the past two weeks, you’ve no doubt seen at least one story about this incredibly dire and catastrophic situation.  

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That’s why several of India’s motorcycle and auto manufacturers have announced that they’re shutting down for at least a few days. Industrial oxygen is a key part of component manufacturing in both the motorcycle and auto industries. As of April 29, 2021, there is currently a ban in place on the use of liquid oxygen for industrial applications, in order to divert it to save lives in the country’s extremely serious fight against the ravages of COVID.  

Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India announced that it would close all four of its factories from May 1 through 15, 2021. It plans to perform its annual maintenance tasks during this time, which had previously been scheduled to take place in June. Maruti Suzuki India, the auto manufacturer, is doing the same from May 1 through 9. Currently, that company’s managing director, Kenichi Ayukawa, is hospitalized after testing COVID-positive for a second time.  

Hero MotoCorp was the first to shut down its factories, announcing a plan to shut each one down for four days at a time, on a rotating schedule, between April 22 and May 1, 2021. Auto manufacturers Toyota Kirloskar Motor Ltd. and MG Motor both announced additional shutdowns of their own, to help divert much-needed oxygen flows to the humans who need them during this crisis.  

There’s no way to overstate the seriousness of this situation. The people of India need as much help as they can get right now. If you want to pitch in, Fast Company has a great list of organizations on the ground you can donate to if you’re able.  

More cancellations

When the Global Pandemic started last year there were many cancellations of get-togethers, races, games, and more we hoped that this year would be different well that might not be true as we see the start of some cancellations going through now. On April 30, 2021, the Harley Owners Group Europe, Middle East, and Africa officially announced that the 2021 European H.O.G. Rally is canceled for this year. You probably already know why, and as a result, it’s probably not a surprise at this point. That doesn’t make it any less disappointing if you were planning to go, though.  

According to the organizers, if you’ve already booked accommodations for the 2021 event you should be able to get a refund. To do so, contact any providers through whom you booked your accommodations and/or travel directly as soon as possible.  

“We have explored all possibilities to hold the European HOG Rally 2021, because we know that it means so much to thousands of people. But we are also aware that the journey – especially across borders – would have been a challenge for our customers,” Harley-Davidson EMEA consumer experience manager Tom Robinson said in a statement. 

“Therefore, the cancellation was the most responsible thing we could do. I would like to especially thank the local authorities, the hotels in the city of Portorož as well as our sponsors and dealers for their patience and their work in supporting this event,” he concluded. 

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Racing calendars are living documents due to the ongoing global pandemic. World-class organizations like Dorna and FIM have remained optimistic, but COVID-19 surges and shutdowns inevitably impact the race schedule. As a result, the latest update to the 2021 World Superbike Championship (WSBK) provisional calendar removes a legendary track but also introduces a new circuit to the series.

Australia’s Philip Island is a fan and rider favorite. The fast and flowing course produces some of the most competitive racing, and many look forward to the Australian round. Unfortunately, the coronavirus situation forced organizers to delay the race. Now, FIM, Dorna WSBK Organization, and the Philip Island Grand Prix Circuit have canceled the 2021 race.

When a door closes, a window opens; and that window is the Czech Republic’s Autodrom Most. Built in 1983, the Autodrom has hosted countless motorsport events, including national motorcycle races. Scheduled for August 6-8, 2021, the WSBK Czech Republic round will put the Autodrom Most on the world stage.

“This is a milestone and a unique event in Autodrom’s almost 40-year history,” said Autodrom Most CEO Josef Zajicek. “We are becoming organizers of World Championship races for the first time. This fact imposes technical requirements on us and an important organization.

“Nevertheless, we are happy to take up this challenge. Our goal is to open our complex to the general public, which is why we need to provide the best possible quality events for our racing fans. And the MOTUL FIM World Superbike Championship is undoubtedly one of these events.”

The 2021 Czech race weekend is the first event in the five-year agreement between the Autodrom and WSBK. Similar to Philip Island, Autodrom Most will return in 2022, and remain on the calendar through 2025.

“We are thrilled to welcome the Autodrom Most to our calendar for the next five seasons,” noted WSBK Executive Director Gregorio Lavilla. “Today’s announcement that WorldSBK is set to return to the Czech Republic for the first time since 2018 reflects the continuing popularity of the Championship among the Czech fans. With Czech teams and riders within the paddock, this is a great opportunity to showcase the Czech Republic on a world stage and I trust the Autodrom Most will be hosting exciting events in the future.”

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you the information on how the Global Pandemic Continues to Rage on as it Effects the Moto-Industry and More

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Royal Enfield Meteor 350 Has Sales Selling Over 30,000 Units

It goes without saying that Royal Enfield has hit the nail on the head with the newest and arguably most successful motorcycle on its roster. Employing a barebones recipe which some are considering the closest thing to pure, unadulterated motorcycling, the Meteor 350 carries with it an undeniable charm that has propelled it to global stardom. AMERiders has the information on the Royal Enfield Meteor 350.

In fact, the Royal Enfield Meteor was so well received it immediately made its way to international markets—surprisingly, including that of the U.S. market. Dustin was able to get his hands on Enfield’s newest cruiser, and judging from his first ride review, the little cruiser definitely punches above its weight class. All that being said, the Meteor 350 continues to see amazing sales performance, with the entry-level cruiser surpassing the 10,000 units sold mark. 

A report published by Indian motorcycle publication, BikeWale, states that the Meteor 350 is catching up to its predecessor, the Classic 350, which has sold 31,694 units. On top of this, the report states that Enfield managed to sell nearly twice as many Meteors as Honda was able to sell their equally hyped-up H’Ness CB350 in India. It’s interesting to note that the two 350-class classic-styled motorcycles were launched at nearly the same time in India. 

The 350cc platform is proving to be successful for Royal Enfield. In fact, the Chennai-based manufacturer is expected to roll out a whole new fleet of models based on the Meteor’s J platform. We’ve covered the two rumored bikes—the new Classic 350 as well as the Hunter 350—which are expected to break cover sometime soon. Equipped with a 349cc single-cylinder, fuel-injected engine, Royal Enfield’s 350 platform is extremely versatile, making for an excellent beginner-friendly motorcycle, as well as a comfortable daily rider for more experienced motorcyclists. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you the information on the Royal Enfield Meteor 350 which has Sales Selling Over 30,000 Units.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Harley Rolls Out the Icon Collection Starting With the Electra Glide Revival

Harley-Davidson is known for its beautiful bikes, one being the Electra Glide, it is one of their iconic bikes. Harley-Davidson Unveiled its Hardwire Five-Year Strategic Plan which Targeted Profitable Growth and Brand Desirability in February of this year. Looks like we get to see part of that Plan unfold now. Starting with the 2021 Electra Glide Revival, AMERiders has the skinny.

As we stated earlier Harley-Davidson Unveiled its Hardwire Five-Year Strategic Plan which Targeted Profitable Growth and Brand Desirability in February of this year. Harley-Davidson CEO Jochen Zeitz. states “With The Hardwire, we made a commitment to introduce a series of motorcycles that align with our strategy to increase desirability and to drive the legacy of Harley-Davidson,” he also said, “With that in mind, I am proud to introduce our new limited production Icons Collection, a series of extraordinary adaptations of production motorcycles which look to our storied past and bright future.”

In 1969, Harley-Davidson introduced the first Electra Glide to the world. The touring model’s “batwing” fairing became a signature Motor Company accessory, and platforms such as the Street Glide and Electra Glide Standard still feature that iconic look. To pay homage to the batwing originator, Harley-Davidson is launching its new Icons Collection with the 2021 Electra Glide Revival.

The limited-edition trim will feature hard saddlebags which, along with the fairing, are painted Birch White to replicate the 60s-era pieces’ fiberglass finish. The Hi-Fi Blue and Black Denim two-tone paint scheme will also return in 2021, and the period-inspired tank badge amplifies the model’s nostalgia. However, the throwback doesn’t just slap a fancy paint job on the existing Electra Glide and call it a day.

Gallery: 2021 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Revival

A black/white two-tone, stitched single-seat captures the era perfectly and sits atop an adjustable coil spring and shock absorber. The chrome railing not only cradles the saddle but also ties in with the chrome air cleaner cover, spoked wheels, saddlebag rails, fork covers, and front fender rails and skirt. Whitewall tires complete the vintage aesthetic and set the Revival apart from Harley’s modern baggers.

Under the old school facade, the special-edition Electra Glide benefits from the bar and shield’s latest technology. The Milwaukee-Eight 114ci (1,868cc) powers the retro bagger with 118 lb-ft of torque and the Boom! Box GTS Infotainment system tucks in behind the classic batwing fairing. Harley-Davidson’s RDRS Safety system also provides cornering-dependent ABS, traction control, and linked braking along with a hill-hold assist and a slipper clutch system.

The Electra Glide Revival will be available in late April, 2021, and retails for $29,199. The Motor Company will only produce 1,500 units and each motorcycle in the series will be numbered. The Electra Glide Revival is the first model in the new Icons Collection, but the brand aims to release one or two Icons motorcycles every year.

What other models would you like to see the MoCo resurrect in the coming years? Maybe an XR750, Low Rider, or WR Racer throwback? How about a Hydra-Glide or an EL Knucklehead? Though the Icons Collection seems to rely on nostalgia and baggers from the outset, Harley could take the program in several different directions over the next few years. We’re looking forward to seeing what they do with it.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you the skinny on Harley Rolls Out the Icon Collection Starting With the Electra Glide Revival.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Sedlak’s Replica of Evel Knievel’s 1972 H-D xr750 Is Almost a Duplicate.

Last Year, Harley-Davidson celebrated the 50th anniversary of the XR750 in style by wrapping the entire racing hardware it fielded, including the team haulers, uniforms, and branded accessories, in the iconic Jet Fire Orange, the competition color used by the Harley-Davidson Factory Flat Track team. But other hues are perhaps equally iconic for the model. This Replica above of Evel Knievel‘s 1972 XR750 is almost a duplicate thanks to Sedlak, AMERiders has the story.

The XR750 was introduced as a replacement for the KR750 in 1970, and quickly became the dominant force in the AMA Grand National Championships. In fact, the model is to date the most successful in the competition’s history, having won 28 championships between 1972 and 2008.

The racing two-wheeler was ridden to success by the sport’s big names, including Jay Springsteen, Mark Brelsford, or Cal Rayborn. But an even more prominent name of the age is linked to it: Evel Knievel.

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One of the most famous stunt performers in history, Knievel rode the XR750 from 1970 to 1976. On the bike, he set a new world record by making it airborne and literally flying over 19 cars, a stunt that was filmed for his namesake 1971 movie. The record stood for 27 years when it was taken to 20 cars by Bubba Blackwell, also riding an XR750.

Like all stuntmen, Knievel identified himself through several iconic elements, including the colors he used on his rides. And in charge of making his bikes and helmets stand out was his favorite painter, George Sedlak.

The bike you see in the gallery above is not one directly linked to Knievel but is painted as a replica by Sedlak—after the stuntman retired, the painter began working on such projects on request.

This one sports the colors red, white, and blue on the fuel tank, but also things like the bike maker’s name in big letters, stars all over, a golden horseshoe, and even an image of the rider jumping a canyon with a bridge in the background.

We uncovered this one on the lot of motorcycles going under the Mecum hammer at the end of the month in Las Vegas. We are not told who it was originally made for, nor how much it is expected to fetch.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you information about Sedlak’s Replica of Evel Knievel’s 1972 H-D XR750 Is Almost a Duplicate.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

No Limit Custom Makes the H-D Limited Softail Look Intimidating & Tough

Generally described as a type of motorcycle boasting the rear suspension concealed under the frame, the term Softail is literally tied to Harley-Davidson. The American bike maker even has some rights for the name, ever since the FXST hit the market in 1984. However, The moniker is deceiving, at least on a superficial level, as there are no soft traits in these bikes. No Limit Custom has modified an H-D Limited Softail to look Intimidating and Tough, AMERiders gives you the skinny on this pretty lady.

The family, which presently includes the Softail, Fat Boy, and Low Rider, among others, are known to be able to take a beating in stock form, but also survive hard customization work performed in shops around the world. What you’re looking at now was once a member of the Softail family, and for all intents and purposes, it still is. Only it has been modified by the German custom bike shop to such a degree that it now looks like a hard, cold piece of threatening metal on two custom wheels.

Called Limited in the shop’s books, the motorcycle was gifted with a sharp-looking fuel tank. What you’re looking at is not a custom piece, but something NLC calls a shell, which is glued on top of the original piece of hardware to give it whatever new shape the owner desires.

The two-wheeler also received a new short rear fender, a so-called engine spoiler meant to make the entire build more aggressive, custom CNC-milled hand levers, and various covers. The most expensive hardware that went into this build is the swingarm kit, worth around $4,400 according to NLC.

Limited Softail

The changes made to the two-wheeler are successful enough to convey a message of toughness, but only for those who can afford it. Combined, the parts used on this build are worth around 6,000 euros, which is roughly $7,000 at today’s exchange rates. That’s not including the man-hours, paint scheme, and of course the bike itself.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you the skinny on No Limit Custom Makes the H-D Limited Softail Look Intimidating & Tough.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Thunderbike’s Silver White Is Impressive With Its 26-Inch Front Wheel

It’s incredible at times to see just how much a motorcycle can change from its stock appearance using the right amount of parts, strategically fitted from front to end. Thunderbike’s Silver White is definitely an impressive bike with its 26-inch front wheel. We at AMERiders are amazed at how beautiful it is.

The bike is the work of a German shop by the name Thunderbike, a group that has been in the business of remaking Harleys for close to three decades now. It’s called Silver White in their books, because of the colors used on it, of course.

There are plenty of changes to go around on this build (some 20 new pieces of hardware were added), but the most obvious one, it seems, is the 26-inch front wheel from the Daytona series. The rear one measures 18 inches, and the difference between the two only adds to the visual drama of the build.

The front wheel was fitted under a custom fender and is enhanced by a bolt-on rake kit that provides 40 degrees of rake and allows for the re-utilization of most of the bike’s original hardware.

But those are not the only changes made to the once common Street Glide. As said, there are about 20 new pieces of hardware, ranging from mostly visual ones, like the various covers, to the more functional-in-nature exhaust system, supplied by Dr. Jekill & Mr. Hyde.

The entire bike is wrapped in just three (non) colors, black for the engine, silver for parts of the gas tank and various other body panels, and pure white to hold them together.

Thunderbike does not say how much the build cost to make, but the parts used on the Silver White alone are worth about 12,000 euros, which is roughly $14,000 at today’s exchange rates. That’s just $8,000 shy of the price of a brand new, stock Street Glide.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you the skinny on Thunderbike’s Silver White with its Impressive 26-Inch Front Wheel.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Kiyonaga’s Galaxy Is a Custom With 3 Bored-Out Honda CB750 Motors

LAND SPEED RACING has a way of inspiring outrageous engineering. The most common motivation is a relentless pursuit of outright speed. Other times, it’s driven by a desire to build something that’s truly out of this world. Shoving three bored-out Honda CB750 motors into one land speed racer is probably a little bit of both.

This, in all of its 12-cylinder, 2,508cc glory, is The Galaxy. It’s the creation of California-based custom motorcycle builder and mad genius, Mitsuhiro “Kiyo” Kiyonaga, and his childhood dream brought to life..

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Kiyonaga-san opened Kiyo’s Garage in Los Angeles in 2013. Around the same time, he built ‘Cherry Blossom,’ a stretched land speed racer with a turbocharged Honda CB750 motor in a scratch-built frame. A few years later ‘Gekko’ followed—another 1970s top fuel-style bike, except this one had two CB motors.

The Galaxy continues Kiyo’s obsession with this theme. “The concept common to all three is a land speed racer with the beauty of a show bike, which can actually run,” he explains.

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“There is a culture called ‘Kacho Fugetsu’ in Japan, which translates literally as flower, bird, wind, moon. But its meaning is the traditional beauty of nature in Japanese aesthetics, and the rhyme of nature. Some write poetry, some sing songs, and some express it in pictures. I want to express Kacho Fugetsu in our machines.”

Kiyo had dreamt of building The Galaxy for a long time, but the project only materialized when he visited the Haas Moto Museum to discuss their acquisition of Cherry Blossom and Gekko. While there, Kiyo also presented owner Bobby Haas and director Stacey Mayfield with sketches of his three-engined concept. Bobby was hesitant at first but eventually reached across the table, shook Kiyo’s hand, and commissioned the project.

Even though Kiyo already had a twin-engined bike under his belt, the step up to three was daunting. “I was skeptical about whether it was possible or not,” he confesses. “However, when I started making it, that anxiety disappeared, and I was able to complete a mechanism that was surprisingly efficient, simple, and fully functional.”

The Galaxy’s four-cylinder power plants are all 1978 Honda CB750 units with F2 large port heads. Each motor has been bored out to 836 cc, and fully rebuilt with lightened and balanced crankshafts, heavy-duty connecting rods, performance cams and oversized stainless steel valves. Extra care was taken to make sure each motor’s internals conformed to the exact same spec.

The motors are each fed by four Keihin FCR 35 mm carbs, with significant work to the intake manifolds to help them run optimally. All three carb sets are linked via a rod-and-heim joint setup, to make it easier to synchronize the throttle slider. But rejetting is still a chore, given that there are 12 carbs to fettle. The entire setup breathes out through twelve custom-made exhausts.

One big challenge was splitting the number one and two engines’ transmissions—a process Kiyo nonchalantly refers to as “simply cutting off unnecessary transmission parts.” The rebuild included fabricating new covers, relocating the oil pumps to sit externally, and working out a custom-built system to circulate oil through all three motors sufficiently.

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A three-piece chassis holds the trio of motors together: a tubular upper frame, and two large engine mounting plates that double up as a rigid ‘swingarm.’ Together with the extensive drillium on the rear plates, it’s part of the design language that defines Kiyo’s trilogy of land speeders.

The front half of The Galaxy’s bodywork is integrated with the frame, and hides the fuel tank and pump, battery, and everything else it needs to run. The tailpiece is a hand-hammered aluminum piece, which also carries the 2.5 gallons of oil that the three Honda engines require. The tiny port sticking out at the back is actually an outlet for the engine breather hose.

Aluminum spun wheels bookend the machine, with holes cut into the front to reduce the effect of crosswinds at speed. The influence of 70s top fuel dragsters is unmistakable in the silhouette, and in the stretched-out ergonomics. The ‘rider triangle’ was carefully judged, offering massive control and knee grip when pinning it across salt flats.

Everything on The Galaxy was handmade, without the aid of CAD software or CNC machines—just the way Kiyo likes it.

“I am more attracted to the warmth unique to handmade products,” he says, “such as roughness, unevenness, and left-right asymmetry, which is finished by hitting, bending, and shaving, rather than an accurate and unrivaled mechanical finish. That is the big joy of creating one with my own hands.”

When it came to the paint job though, Kiyo took his hands off, giving total creative freedom to the same artist that painted the previous two bikes: Gen Katsuragawa at Love Ear Art. The overall effect is surprisingly whimsical, belying just how potent this machine actually is.

The Galaxy has now taken up residence in the Haas Moto Museum alongside its siblings, but Kiyo doesn’t consider it complete. Before he ticks that box, he has one more challenge to face: racing it at Bonneville.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you the skinny on “Kiyo” Kiyonaga’s Galaxy is a custom bike with 3 bored-out Honda CB750 motors.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

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Origin8or’s Custom Classic Honda CB900F Looks Fast Standing Still

The two-wheeled showstopper you’re looking at here is the work of Origin8or’s Rob Chappell, an ambitious graphic designer who goes about his daily business in Toronto, Canada. As you might’ve already guessed, this solo craftsman shares our deep passion for custom motorcycles of all sorts, and the project featured today is among the tastiest undertakings in his portfolio. No matter what Origin8or’s custom classic Honda CB900F looks fast standing still, at least that is what we here at AMERiders think.

Prior to landing in Chappell’s hands, this mechanical titan was an ordinary 1981 Honda CB900F. In stock form, the Japanese superstar is powered by an air-cooled DOHC inline-four mill that packs sixteen valves and a sizeable displacement of 901cc. At optimal rpm, the four-stroke samurai will gladly summon up to 95 feral horses and 57 pound-feet (77 Nm) of vicious twist.

Although this bad boy may not have been as popular as the almighty CB750, it’s quite safe to say that it was a force to be reckoned with. Now that we’ve reminded ourselves about its powertrain characteristics let’s see how Canada’s Origin8or managed to transform an undistinguished ‘81 CB900F into something truly outstanding.

Chappell’s stunning makeover began at the rear end, where he cut the machine’s stock subframe to make way for a bespoke counterpart. The twin shock absorbers were discarded in favor of a 2008 Yamaha R6’s monoshock and swingarm unit, while a Suzuki GSX-R750’s high-grade forks handle front suspension duties.

After sculpting cafe racer-style knee dents on either side, Rob honored the standard gas tank with a flip-up filler cap. On the other end, you will spot a Kawasaki KZ1000’s repurposed tail section and one gorgeous custom saddle, along with rear-mounted footpegs. Upfront, the CB900F wears clip-on handlebars, an aftermarket top clamp from Cognito Moto, and a Harley-Davidson V-Rod’s unmistakable headlight module.

Stopping power is taken good care of by braided brake lines and wave rotors on both ends. The beast crawls on a set of Carrozzeria V-Track forged aluminum wheels, enveloped in high-performance Dunlop GP-A tires. Besides increasing the inline-four’s displacement to a healthy 985cc, Origin8or’s mastermind also installed Keihin CR31 carburetors and a complete Cycle-X exhaust system for good measure.

Lastly, the bike’s electrics were treated to a state-of-the-art Dynatek ignition, fresh coils, and an antigravity battery. The finishing touches come in the form of bar-end turn signals and digital gauges, as well as an LED taillight with integrated turn signals.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you the skinny on Origin8or’s Custom Classic Honda CB900F that Looks Fast Standing Still.

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The Triumph “Bullet” by Alo’s Cafe is a Tribute to Swiss Watchmakers

The aftermarket surgeons over at Alo’s Cafe go about their daily business in Massa, a small town located near Pisa, Italy. Not only does this firm specialize in retailing Triumph’s mechanical spartans, but it has also built many custom entities since birth. For a clear demonstration of the shop’s abilities, we’ll take a minute to examine a project commissioned by a Swiss watchmaking brand named Meccaniche Veloci. The “bullet” is a tribute to Swiss Watchmakers AMERiders explains.

At its core, the unique two-wheeled machine you see here is a Triumph Thruxton 1200 R. In stock guise, this bad boy is brought to life by a liquid-cooled parallel-twin engine packing four valves per cylinder and a gargantuan displacement of 1,200cc. At 6,750 rpm, the four-stroke predator produces 96 ponies, while a torque output of 83 pound-feet (112 Nm) is generated at 4,950 revs.

A six-speed transmission is tasked with channeling the engine’s oomph to the rear wheel via a chain final drive, allowing the Thruxton to achieve a healthy top speed of 135 mph (217 kph). When this vicious warrior landed on Alo’s doorstep, the team wasted no time working their magic to transform it into something truly sensational.

For starters, they went about fabricating a curvy exhaust system in-house. It wears a pair of top-shelf mufflers from Zard’s inventory, topped with unique alloy inserts on their tips. As soon as the new pipes were installed, the Italian craftsmen proceeded to invest over 100 hours into manufacturing a complete aluminum outfit, consisting of a retro-style half fairing, one-off side panels, and a tiny front fender.

Additionally, you will spot a flawless black leather saddle that looks absolutely bonkers. It is appropriately complemented by fresh leather grips on the creature’s handlebars. Last but not least, the beast has been dubbed “The Bullet,” and a brushed finish was chosen for its bespoke bodywork modules.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders give you information on the Triumph “Bullet” by Alo’s Cafe as a Tribute to Swiss Watchmakers.

Don’t forget to come visit us for all your Motorcycle Apparel needs.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.