Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Can Be Good for You as Well

We already have the scientific proof that riding is good for us. The proof is in the numbers and now more than ever, mental health is an important key to a healthy, balanced lifestyle. The Harley-Davidson-funded study didn’t break down the data into types of riding—of course, as Harley goes, the references to the riding were mainly road-oriented. In a less scientific and let’s say more holistic approach, an author discusses how to find balance in different aspects of your life. Someone took his advice and listed how off-roading checks off all the boxes. Hey, any documentation that says that riding is good for our health, we at AMERiders can get behind. So if this shows Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Can Be Good for You as Well we’ll give it a thumbs up.

Author Samir Becic is a bit of a fitness and health guru. He published a book entitled “ReSYNC Your Life” that details 28-day steps to help the reader find physical and spiritual balance. You may or may not agree/be interested with what the guy has to say; that’s not why we’re here. What’s really cool is how the people at Indochina Travel Blog have taken the principles promoted by Becic and used them to illustrate how off-roading actually meets all these “find your inner balance” criteria. Wind therapy indeed!

Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Good

Just like regular, street riding, off-roading increases the rider’s heart rate, which is comparable to a low strain workout and helps strengthen the heart and develop endurance—obviously not at the rate jogging does, but enough to have a positive impact. Depending on the type of surface you are facing, the ride also helps strengthen muscles—the more rugged the terrain, the harder the workout. Hill climb, jumps, or obstacle crawl? Even better!

Off-Road Motorcycle Cliff Riding

Another benefit that street riders don’t reap as much as off-road riders is a balance. As you make your way through a rough landscape, some spots require you work on your balance to overcome the obstacles, again working those muscles but also engaging the brain. Road riding has already proven to help increase cognitive functions, adrenaline levels, and overall focus. These functions and health benefits are boosted on steroids by the fact that you are riding over a much more challenging surface that requires additional analysis and concentration.

According to Indochina Travel Blog but maybe a little more debatable is the promotion of a good posture. Of course, motocross and adventure motorcycles force the rider into a straighter stance. Plus, posture does play a role in balance but whether it promotes better posture in everyday life remains to be seen. That being said, a few hours of good posture is better than none at all!

households

Finally, riding off-road gets you outside. You know how people complain about being inside all the time nowadays. I mean, with all the technology we enjoy today, there’s very little that requires us to step out—we can even get groceries delivered to our door. Off-roading can’t be done inside so this is the occasion to get a bowl (or a tank) of fresh air and enjoy a moment of communion with nature, especially considering off-roading is usually done in remote places, in the woods, and on countryside dirt roads. So, have you gone for a ride yet? I don’t think you need more excuses to go now.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Off-Road Motorcycle Riding

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information How Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Can Be Good for You.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Source: Indochina Travel Blog

Why Do Motorcycle Riders and Vehicle Drivers Hate Each Other so Much?

We’re all in the same boat anyway! It all started with this video. This clever and funny campaign promotes motorcycle safety and reminds drivers to be aware of motorcyclists on the road. Nothing inherently wrong with that, right? As a rider, I found the message important; as a human being, I found the Ryan Reynolds references hilarious. AMERiders goes into Motorcycle Riders Vehicle Drivers Hate Each Other.

Then, I started reading the comments users had left about the video on YouTube and Facebook and was flabbergasted. An open war of words between drivers dissing the message and blaming riders for their obnoxious behavior and motorcyclists dissing drivers in return for being killing machines. Nothing I haven’t seen before, but it prompted the question: why?

Every road user whines about the other, that’s nothing new. Drivers complain about cyclists, motorcyclists complain about drivers, everyone complains about pedestrians and pedestrians do whatever they like… We’re like a bunch of kids in kindergarten having to share toys.

However, reading drivers’ comments calling out motorcyclists and telling them that their safety is their own goddamn business and that they should be more careful makes me cringe. Dismissing the fact that drivers do represent a potential hazard for motorcyclists is like denying the Earth is spinning, and that’s an issue mainly because it removes the concept of responsibility from the equation. In a car versus motorcycle “battle”, the heavyweight wins.

Of course, I am aware that some riders act stupid, even entitled, and that some of their actions are what actually lead to their demise. There’s absolutely no denying that some riders are complete idiots and not every motorcycle crash involves a driver. Heck, I’ve had driver’s frustrations myself and have even cussed at motorcyclists I thought were making dumb decisions or taking pointless risks. There are some really bad riders out there.

Thing is, there are also really bad drivers. Just like there are really good drivers and really good riders. I can’t help but wonder how is a handful of dumb-dumbs on two wheels any worst than a handful of them on four wheels? Why are motorcyclists less deserving of acknowledgment because of a few loose cannons? Somehow, because motorcycles tend to stand out from the crowd, it seems like people associate them with bad habits and decisions. There’s no clear explanation of why, but the way I see it, it likely all stems from a lack of understanding, and that stems a bit of hate right there.

hate

I strongly believe that basic motorcycle training should be part of every new driver’s training program. Not because people should be forced to ride, but because from my own personal experience, I’ve learned even more about road safety from being on a bike. It might also cut down on the hate bikers have for vehicle drivers as well as vice versa.

Look where you want to go, keep your eyes up and look ahead, be aware of what the driver in front of you is doing, but also the drivers in front of him—this is precious advice that’s not only useful on two wheels but also on four. I don’t remember my driving instructor ever encouraging me to “look where I want to go”—I picked that up from my motorcycle lessons and it’s an incredibly useful habit to have.

I believe that riding has helped me fine-tune certain aspects of my driving skills and that I’ve become a better driver thanks to it. From my personal experience, I find a correlation between motorcycle riding and better awareness on the road. I’m not saying that drivers who have never been on a motorcycle are bad or that everyone who’s been on a bike is an impeccable driver—I just find that people who ride motorcycles consistently have good driving habits.

Putting new drivers in a saddle even just for an hour can help bring a new perspective and a better understanding of the reality of riding. It can also help drivers see beyond their own little bubble, get over the whole “they’re allowed to do things we’re not” discussion and understand that some of these maneuvers help increase safety. 

Ultimately, we’re all stuck in the same boat: we all have to share the road whether we like it or not. If motorcycles circulating between rows of cars are safer, what’s so wrong about it? On the other hand, riders aren’t entitled to anything—riding is a privilege, not a right. So how about we all look out for each other instead of going about this whole thing with an “every man for himself” mentality?

Drivers, we riders aren’t trying to piss you off. We are just trying to get where we need to be and do it alive. Riders, car drivers aren’t out to kill you. They’re just trying to get where they need to be alive.

See any resemblance? There really is no hate there.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on
Why Do Motorcycle Riders and Vehicle Drivers Hate Each Other so Much.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Some Really Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You

There are a million reasons not to ride. Here are some really good reasons motorcycle riding is good for you. Despite the joy that motorcycles offer, only a relatively small fraction of the population rides. While each rider is motivated by their own unique factors, there are a number of strong reasons why everyone should consider getting on two wheels. We have given you reasons before in other articles we here at AMERiders want to reiterate how much fun motorcycle riding can be.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

A Lighter Footprint

Motorcycles have less of an impact on the world compared to cars. Not only do they cause markedly less wear and tear on the road, but they also give off fewer emissions, don’t contribute to congestion, help conserve fuel, free up more parking, and ultimately require less raw materials to be produced.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Fewer Wheels, Less Money

Motorcycles themselves are substantially cheaper than cars in pretty much every regard. The insurance, upkeep, fuel, you name it, and it’s all substantially cheaper in practically every measurable area. Even though your average motorcycle will still be the more economical option in contrast to a car, there exist a number of models that are known for being particularly awesome bang-for-your-buck bikes, like the Suzuki SV650 or Yamaha MT-07.  

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Inject Some Excitement Into Your Routine

Unlike the four-wheeled vehicles, they share the roads with, motorcycles possess the unique ability to cram some excitement and adventure into your daily life/routine. Chances are you have to travel most days, so why not have fun while doing it. Riding can turn commuting from a necessary evil into the highlight of one’s day. 

Good Exercise

Though the motorcycle itself is doing the lion’s share of the work, piloting a motorcycle is a physically active endeavor and not a passive experience like driving a car. Zipping through traffic or cruising down the freeway isn’t very physically demanding, however the same can’t be said for canyon carving, or any other form of aggressive riding really. Flicking a bike from side to side while exhibiting proper body positioning requires a great deal of movement and can, in turn, be a great workout, which is just one of the Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You.

Beat Traffic

While not applicable everywhere, lane splitting and filtering are complete and total game-changers in major metropolitan areas, especially ones riddled with congestion. Motorcycles essentially give you a legal pass in many places to cut the proverbial traffic line and zip along to your destination, while passing countless drivers caught up in the daily gridlock. Once you try it, you’ll never go back.

The Community Rocks

While this one is a bit of a cliché, it’s still very true. The motorcycling community is packed with some really incredible people. Few other commonalities bring strangers from different walks of life together quite like riding. Each year there are countless stories about bikers and riders groups carrying out selfless acts to help those in need. Despite the general public’s rather stereotypical misperception, bikers really are some of the nicest people…and you don’t just meet them on Hondas.

Disconnecting From A Hyper-Connected World

In today’s day and age, far too many of us are permanently tethered to our smartphones. One study from 2017 found that the average person checks their phone around 80 times per day. While this is waning due to the increased presence of Bluetooth connectivity and comms systems and what not on motorcycles, riding still presents one of the rare opportunities to completely unplug from social media, mobile devices, or whatever other distractions or stresses that may be weighing on you. Riding allows you to Zen out, let go, and focus purely on the task at hand.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Learn More Mechanics

If you own a motorcycle for long enough, you’d have to make a conscious effort to actively avoid doing any maintenance or upkeep whatsoever in order to not learn a thing or two about how an engine operates. Even if it’s simply grasping the basics of an internal combustion engine cycle, most riders tend to be better versed in mechanics than your average car owner. The relationship between rider and bike is more intense than the ones between cars and their owners, so bikers tend to be more motivated to learn what makes the bike tick, and how to keep it ticking.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Supercar Experience At Kia Pricing

If you want to go out and purchase a car capable of doing anything close to 200mph, you should realistically expect to spend in the high five-figures, if not well into the six-figures. Experiencing the performance of a sub-3-second 0-60mph time is typically a sensation reserved for the wealthy, that is unless you’re on a motorcycle. See, for a couple grand (or less), anyone can hop on their local Craigslist, purchase an older used sportbike, and then be capable of besting more than 90 percent of the cars on the road. This is another great reason to opt for travel on two wheels.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

The Gear

Motorcycle gear has come a long way from goggles and heavy leather gauntlets and waxed cotton riding coats. Whether its heads up displays and action cameras that enable you to record your rides in HD or the fully-armored and Kevlar lined jeans and flannels that look all GQ when off the bike, there’s just so much great gear out there today. Advancements in materials and construction techniques give us riders an enormous selection of gear ranging in type, style, price, etc. Whatever your style or taste, there’s probably a bunch of fantastic gear out there that’s right up your alley.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Best Time To Start

For years small-displacement entry-level options were few and far between. Novice riders had few choices, and the bikes that did exist weren’t particularly attractive or exciting. Today, though, you can find pretty much any style of scoot you want in a learner bike. “You can go out right now and buy a gorgeous stock entry-level bike” isn’t a statement that would have been true even half-a-decade-ago, adding to our list of Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on Some Really Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

What No One Tells You About Your First Motorcycle Ride

We often forget to mention a few things you should expect when you start riding. Aspiring motorcyclists of the internet age frequently search for articles and forum posts to tell them what to expect once they hit the road on two wheels for the first times. There’s a lot of good advice and some not-so-good you can find here are a few points that AMERiders found about some things that no one tells you about your First Motorcycle ride.

1. Respect For The Machine Is Not Enough

The most common advice new riders get is to respect the machine. Almost any motorcycle, even a tame beginner bike, can outrun almost any car on the road. The thing is, any new rider with a sense of self-preservation is fully aware of this, as well as the fact that they don’t have the experience to properly handle the bike yet. Most riders aren’t popping wheelies and burnouts on their first motorcycle ride because they already respect the machine.

2. You Will Hit Random Buttons

Even before taking the MSF course, I bought The Complete Idiot’s Guide To Motorcycles, with a keen interest in learning exactly where all of the controls were. With so many controls placed by your thumbs, you’re bound to hit the horn when you intend to signal at times. Some say this is a newbie thing, but since different bikes put their controls in different places, I’ve personally never completely outgrown this.

First Motorcycle Ride

3. The Throttle Is Very Touchy

A small engine with a small flywheel is much more responsive to throttle inputs than a larger car engine. That, plus inexperience with a hand throttle, means that you’ll be revving the engine too much at times. This just takes practice.

4. Downshifting Is More Jerky Than You Expect

For similar reasons, shifting to a lower gear isn’t very smooth, even if you do it slowly. There are techniques such as rev matchingthat will help with this, but as a newbie, you haven’t learned those yet, and your attention should be on mastering basic bike control first.

First Motorcycle Ride

5. The Bike Is Much More Stable At Higher Speeds

The MSF course has you poking around a parking lot, but once you hit higher speeds on the street, it’s amazing just how much more stable the bike is. It actively wants to stay upright instead of falling over, and the faster you go, the more pronounced this effect is. It’s simple physics, centrifugal force and such, but you have to experience it to really understand it.

6. Countersteering Doesn’t Work At Slow Speeds

One of the most important skills the MSF course teaches you is countersteering, which is necessary to make a bike turn at higher speeds. Ironically, this technique doesn’t work at slower parking lot speeds. You simply don’t have the momentum for countersteering to have the desired effect. Fortunately, slow speeds are the only time that simply turning the handlebars works.

First Motorcycle Ride

7. Feeling When To Countersteer Comes Quickly

As you accelerate, there comes a point when you should stop turning and start countersteering. This transition speed varies, but with experience, you will simply know when to change your cornering technique from one to the other.

8. Learning The Stopping Process

In a car, you simply press the brake (and push in the clutch if you’re in the small minority that drives a manual transmission), then you stop. On a bike, you have two brake controls, a clutch, and a shifter to manage, all while making sure to move a foot off the controls and onto the ground before tipping over.

The MSF teaches you to use both front and rear brakes, pull in the clutch, and downshift to first gear while you’re still moving. Then use your left foot to stabilize yourself, riding the rear brake with your right foot until you’re completely stopped, at which point you can put it down if you want. That’s a lot to manage all at once, especially for a new rider. You will mess this up. I still don’t always get this right. It’s OK.

First Motorcycle Ride

9. Using The Whole Lane

Suddenly, on a motorcycle, you have all this space to play with inside your lane. You can hug the left, the right, or the middle of it. Pothole cratered roads magically smooth out as you can swerve around the bumps without leaving your assigned lane. That’s so cool.

10. Using The Appropriate Gear

In this case, I mean what gear the transmission is in, not what riding gear you’re wearing. My Honda PC800 has gearing and an engine RPM range like a car, but it’s the exception to the rule for motorcycles. You may find yourself lugging away from a stop in a gear that would be appropriate in a car but is way too low on a motorcycle. Some bikes can hit 90 mph in second gear with no problem. Learning when to be in what gear just takes practice.

11. Getting Used To Higher Engine RPMs

On a bike with a 14,000 RPM redline, cruising down the highway at 6,000 RPM is perfectly OK. You wouldn’t want to try that in most cars, especially since this is a past redline for some engines. A smaller motorcycle engine can handle higher revs with ease. The inline-4 engine that many sportbikes use runs quite smoothly, and you won’t even notice when you’re routinely running it at revs that would make many car engines explode.

I hope that these tips have helped you to understand just what your in for with your First Motorcycle ride.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

First Motorcycle Ride

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information about What No One Tells You About Your First Motorcycle Ride.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Speeding Ticket: In What States Are You Most Likely to Get One In?

We always try to find patterns when it comes to being pulled over. Is it entirely random or are there factors that weigh in the balance? The type of bike you’re riding on, its color maybe? Or maybe it has something to do with riding alone versus in a group? You’d be hard pressed to find a functioning algorithm to answer that question. A New York-based Honda dealer decided to have a look at the most recent data when it comes to getting a speeding ticket. While you might or might not get away with busting the speed limit, it seems like some states are likely to go harder on you than others. AMERiders explains what the dealer found.

Yonkers Honda attempted to have a look at the places across the country you are more and less likely to get pulled over for a speeding ticket. The team managed to get data from 48 of the 50 states, commenting that Louisiana and Arkansas proved to be too elusive). They then compiled the total number of tickets handed out in each state from the most recent year on record, as well as the number of tickets issued per 10,000 citizens—which is the data we’re interested in.

Speeding Ticket

Obviously, California stood out with the highest volume of tickets issued with over 1M handed in 2017, however, prorated to the population, it turns out that at 330 tickets per 10k people. It didn’t even make the top 10 list of states that issue the most tickets per capita.

That honor surprisingly goes to Wyoming. With an average of 903 tickets per 10k people issued in 2017, for a total of over 42,000 for the year, the state ranks first in the number of ticket per capita. A quick math tells us that roughly one out of eleven citizens have received a fine for speeding. Wyoming is followed closely by South Carolina and Oregon.

Speeding Ticket

The big winner of speeding ticket pool is Michigan with only 70 tickets issued per 10,000 citizens while the state that has issued the least tickets in total was North Dakota in 2016 with 4,512 statements for the entire year. Looks like people on the northern West Coast and southern East Coast better keep their speed in check!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

speeding ticket

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Speeding Ticket and What States Are You Most Likely to Get One In.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Yonkers Honda

May 2019 Is Motorcycle Awareness Month so Look Twice Save a Life.

There are many things to be aware and we have a month for all of them some of them are just a day or a week. But each May we have Motorcycle Awareness Month. AMERiders supports Motorcycle Awareness Month so make sure to look twice and save a life.

In the month of May, in particular, look out for motorcycle safety events in your area. Some of these are rides that promote visibility, others are geared toward skills enhancement. All of them will help make you a better rider. For example, two years ago, I decided to upgrade my moto license, which meant that I had to review, practice, and demonstrate all the rules of the road. What were those reminders, you ask? So glad you did.

Motorcycle awareness
Keep your eyes peeled for other riders

After a day with an experienced instructor I was reminded of the importance of the following:

  1. Leave lots of space between you and the driver in front both while you’re riding and while you’re waiting. This gives you more space to evade the drive that you suddenly notice is headed right where you are as though you aren’t there. You saw this because you always….
  2. Watch your side mirrors—even when you’re stopped. Someone hit our car from behind just yesterday. He thought the advance green was for him, ‘cept we were all still waiting for our light. Well, not all of us, clearly; great reminder to watch for distracted drivers.
  3. Wear all your gear, all the time, even when it’s damn hot. Nothing is as warm as third degree burns on your whole body, and nothing ruins a riding season like broken limbs.

Fact is, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA), as the number of motorcycle riders increases (yay!) so do the instances of fatal motorcycle crashed (boo!), 37 percent of which involve alcohol! Drink and ride? Duh. Aside from giving you an over-inflated sense of your abilities, alcohol impairs both your balance and response time. Drugs are also a bad idea on a bike, but the statistics are difficult to gather, so in the meantime, err on the side of “no.” After all, isn’t riding the only high you need?

Choosing to participate in a sport that has elevated levels of risk is not what we need to avoid, we need to avoid our own mistakes and drivers who make them. So, during this, the month when we’re paying a little more attention, do that. Don’t complain about what people do, watch out for them while you do everything right.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on May 2019 Is Motorcycle Awareness Month so Look Twice Save a Life.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Sources: NHTSAMMIC

Riding This Summer? Here Are Tips to Stay Cool While Riding

Summer is coming, and as usual, we are here with some tips to help you stay cool during rides on hot summer days. The best way to stay cool is to remain inside an air-conditioned building, but what is the fun in that?

When you’re on a multi-day tour on your motorcycle, sometimes you just have no choice but to ride in hot weather. There are a bunch of things you can do to stay safe. Remember, overheating is dangerous, for your bike and for you. If you ride an air-cooled motorcycle be careful to avoid congested city centers so that you are not stuck in traffic and risking overheating your engine. You can experience heat stress, too, so keep an eye out for things like dizziness, weakness, nausea, and muscle fatigue. Heat can kill you, so take care.

summer

Cover Yourself

Next, think about what you’re wearing. The best thing to wear is some light-colored gear with full coverage. You might think you would want to wear the least amount of clothing possible but that’s pretty dangerous in a few ways.

Let’s ignore for the purposes of this article the obvious problem with you the hitting pavement, and rocks, or anything else that might come flying at you, with bare skin, and talk about sunburn and dehydration. Constant wind will mask the feeling of sunburn. While your skin is literally being braised by that giant ball of fire in the sky, it’s also being dried out by that very wind. These things are both your enemy in the heat. Mesh riding gear lets enough wind through to cool you off, but covers you up and protects against sunburn, bugs, rocks, and sudden contact with the asphalt.

summer

Hydrate!

Stay hydrated! Here’s another tip that sounds like common sense, but staying thoroughly hydrated gives you a defense against heat: your body can manage the temperatures better. Remember, you’re water-cooled. Don’t let your coolant run low.

There are some that wear a backpack-type hydration bladder under their riding gear. Stuff it full of ice and fill it with water, then route the hose up under your helmet (a ninety-degree bite valve helps) and take a sip from it once in a while. Slow, steady hydration works much better than tossing back a whole bottle at stops. Most gas stations that have mini-marts with a soda machine will not charge you for ice and water if you ask nicely, so you can refill two tanks while you’re there. While you’re at it, do not avoid salty snacks, because your body is losing salt while it’s sweating too. Your sodium-potassium pumps need something to work with, and you don’t want to end up with hyponatremia, either. Yeah, I’m making you google those.

Just Like A Swimming Pool

While you’re at the gas station filling one tank and emptying another, take a moment to take your high-tech wicking shirt off, and soak it in the bathroom sink. Make sure it’s good and soaked, wring it out and put it back on. It’s like jumping into a swimming pool!

Now the breeze coming through your mesh gear will cool you off and your body won’t have to work so hard to sweat. Also, you’ve rinsed some of the smelliness out of your shirt.

summer

Ride At Dawn Or Dusk

The best thing to do to beat the heat is not to ride when it’s so hot. I know that sounds obvious and impossible, but staying off the bike during the hottest part of the day can help a lot. If you have places to be, start early and get off the road before it’s a real scorcher. Your favorite weather app can help you out here.

summer

Wooded Roads Are Cool!

The roads you ride can make a big difference during the Summer. Staying on back roads that are shaded by trees is a huge advantage in the heat. Trees absorb heat and keep the sun from heating up the asphalt under you. Temperatures in the wooded shade can be ten degrees cooler than open highways baking in the sun.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with Tips to Stay Cool While Riding this Summer.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.


Traveling by Motorcycle Which Luggage Is Right for You? Hard or Soft?

When it comes time to take a trip on your motorcycle, you’re going to have to bring some things with you. The easiest, safest, and most secure way to do that is with motorcycle-specific luggage, letting the bike carry the weight. But what style is best for you? AMERiders goes over your luggage options for when you go traveling.


6pc Rock Genuine Leather Motorcycle Luggage Set

Soft Luggage

Let’s start with soft luggage. These are more like duffel bags for your bike. Generally, they have a zipper or clip closure and are secured to the bike with adjustable straps, making them reasonably universal. There is soft luggage that leans more toward a dirtbike application (often drybag style) or a cruiser application (often leather) or a sportbike application (often Cordura), but can usually be modified to fit whatever you ride. Unless your soft bags are nylon-coated like a drybag, their waterproofness is going to be questionable

Soft luggage is convenient because most of the time you do not need specific racks to fit it to your motorcycle, and it can be fully removed quite easily. You can get a soft luggage rack for your bike. With that said, without a rack, there is nothing to hold this luggage away from easily-scratched or hot parts of your motorcycle.

You must be very careful every time you put the luggage onto, or take it off of, your bike, to make sure that it is secure and will not shift, placing it in danger of melting against an exhaust pipe or wedging into any moving parts of your bike.

traveling

Motorcycle Saddlebag With Zip-Off Heavy Duty Velcro Cover

Soft luggage is lightweight and can be rolled up or collapsed when empty very easily while traveling.

It is easy to carry off the bike and it is fairly inexpensive, all told. It also can help create a narrow profile, and in a crash has less of a chance of injuring the rider.

That all said, soft luggage has its disadvantages and this is where hard cases shine.

Hard Luggage

Certainly hard luggage is first and foremost more expensive than its soft-sided counterpart. It is heavier and bulkier, and it is always the same size whether it is packed to the gills or perfectly empty. It requires application-specific hardware that is a relatively permanent install on your bike, so even if you take the bags off, the racks remain.

Hard luggage, though, is lockable. Where soft luggage can be cut open or cut off, hard bags present a much tougher target for a would-be thief. Even if your soft bags are attached with a strap under your locked seat, a pocket knife will make short work of them. Hard luggage is the most secure option for when you’re going to park your bike and be out of sight of it. This is something to think about when traveling.

Tenere Topbox

Hard luggage is secure from another standpoint: properly affixed to your motorcycle, it will never shift and melt against your pipes, or scratch your paint, or wedge itself into your rear wheel. Where you put it is where it will stay, and securing it is generally a five to the ten-second proposition, instead of minutes spent adjusting straps and making sure your seat still clicks into place. Hard luggage is quite a bit heavier than soft, but it is waterproof.

You can often wire your hard luggage for lighting. You can certainly put retro-reflective stickers on your hard bags for extra visibility, while with soft luggage you are left with whatever reflective piping the manufacturer chose to apply.

It’s more of a project to carry hard cases away from the bike, but if you use case liners you can just leave the bags behind, locked to the bike, and carry the liners into, say, your hotel room for the night.

Not least, a good heavy pannier will function as a really good frame slider in the event of an unplanned get-off. You may scratch up the surface of the bag, but any hard luggage and rack system worth its salt will survive a mild to a moderate accident with only cosmetic damage and without leaving your unmentionables strewn about the roadway. Replacing a single saddlebag is easier than replacing motorcycle hard parts.

Now that you know all about the good parts and bad parts of each type of motorcycle luggage system, you’ll need to figure out which features are most important to you and your riding /traveling style and use that information to shop!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

traveling

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Traveling by Motorcycle Which Luggage Is Right for You? Hard or Soft?

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Source: ADVPulseRevzillaWolfman Luggage

Predictable Mistakes New Riders Make

If you just passed your exam and received your shiny new motorcycle license, welcome to the family! I’m always excited to hear about friends and acquaintances saying they are starting their riding lessons or shopping for a bike—it means the family is expanding. We all have to start somewhere, AMERiders tells you of a few predictable mistakes that some new riders make.

For all the new riders out there, even once you have that little piece of plastic in your wallet proving you are now a legal motorcycle rider, you’re not done learning and you are bound to make a number of predictable mistakes. It’s all part of the process. Some of these mistakes can be avoided and we decided to discuss them with you and give you some advice in the hopes you’ll learn a thing or two.

Mistakes

Motorcycle Lessons Are For Losers

“I’ve been riding bikes since I was a kid, I’ve got this.” Good for you kid, but the problem with that statement is that pacing your little 50cc in your parents’ backyard has nothing to do with real-life riding.

Granted, being at ease in the saddle will give you a clear advantage over someone who’s never ridden: you already know how riding feels and are already familiar with some basic techniques. What sandbox riding doesn’t teach you, however, is everything relating to road safety, hazard avoidance techniques, and overall awareness. Don’t underestimate the purpose of these lessons—being humble while learning to ride is a bigger advantage than being cocky.

I Don’t Need All That Fancy Gear

We’ve all been there: having to dig into our pockets to pay for our first few pieces of riding gear. If you know anything about us, at AMERiders we are active advocates of ATGATT—All The Gear, All The Time. We gladly point and laugh at those assuming that flip-flops, shorts, and tank tops are appropriate riding attire.

We’ve done countless lists of cool and inexpensive gear that will get you started safely. Especially when you are getting started, you are more vulnerable to making mistakes and dropping the bike or falling, so suit up, you’ll be glad you did.

You don’t have to spend $3,000 in Dainese and Shoei gear right off the bat, but a good DOT helmet, a jacket with elbow and shoulder protectors, solid gloves, and boots/shoes that offer ankle support are a good place to start. For the pants, the number of affordable options out there are endless. But yeah, riding is an expensive hobby, so you might want to wrap your head around that.

mistakes

Small Bikes Are Lame; My Dad Is Getting Me An H2 For My Birthday

I read that in a conversation thread somewhere—I don’t know if it’s true, but that’s one of the dumbest things a new rider fresh off the school bench can say. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t actually believe 125 or 300cc bikes are the best beginners’ bikes unless you want to have to change bikes after only a year or two because you’d like something with more gut.

However, there are fantastic and forgiving mid-range bikes that you will be able to grow with and learn from and that won’t feel underpowered once you gain more experience. Big displacement bikes sound sexy and badass—they kind of are. However, thinking you can get away with having 230hp between your knees with your license fresh off the press tucked in your pocket is like thinking you can run before you learn to walk. Patience my young Padawan, learning is a process. If you try to cut the corners, you could end up on the organ donor list.

If My Friends Can Do It, I Can Do It Too

There’s technically nothing inherently wrong with that statement, however, we all know what peer pressure does to us. It makes us do things we’re not always comfortable doing. Sometimes it makes for a good story to tell, sometimes it gets you into trouble. If your buddy is able to take corners at a 45-degree angle and at speeds of 50 mph, or if he is able to tackle any off-road trail in the world, it doesn’t mean you have to as well.

By that I mean don’t ride beyond your level of competence.  As a new rider, you’re still fine-tuning your skills and learning your bike’s limits. If you push too hard, that’s when you make mistakes, either because you went beyond the limits or got scared stepping out of your comfort zone. As you gain experience, you will hone your skills and eventually, you’ll be able to keep up with your more experienced—or hooligan—buddies. There’s no shame in being the last of the pack if it means you are enjoying yourself and not having minor panic attacks at every new maneuver.

mistakes

Cool, Now I Can give Rides To All Of My Friends

Quite frankly, going for rides with friends is a really cool experience, but you have to make sure you are ready for it. First off, you need to be able to communicate what you expect from them (no sudden reactions, hold on tight or else you end up banging helmets all the time, lean in with the bike, don’t try to counteract the motion, etc.). You also have to be ready to maneuver the bike with the extra weight—which you feel mainly when you are stopped or navigating at lower speeds.

As the rider, you are also entirely responsible for your friend’s safety. Do you have extra gear for them? Yeah, taking your friends everywhere is cool, but that means having to have double the gear so that they are protected if you mess up (so if you think gear even just for you is too expensive, you might want to reconsider carrying someone on the pillion).

Riding A Motorcycle Is Like Driving A Car

No. No, it’s not. If you think that, refer back to the first point and take your lessons, then we can talk. The only similarity is that laws apply to both car drivers and motorcycles riders—and even then, not all laws are the same for both groups.

You are much more vulnerable on a motorcycle than you are in a car—and much, much more invisible. Most drivers expect to see another car in their mirrors or in their blind spot, not all of them notice when there’s a motorcycle instead. Your level of awareness needs to be tenfold—you almost need to think for the others around you and drive in a much more defensive way than you would in a car. You always have to assume people don’t see you, so don’t hang out in people’s blind spots and keep your distances.

The road conditions can also have a bigger impact on you (potholes, tram rails, wet surfaces, etc.)

The silver lining is that as riders, we get to benefit from a few perks, depending on the area. Free parking for motorcycles is a thing in some cities, so is lane filtering and splitting, things cars are not allowed to do. So pay attention and do make the predictable mistakes that everyone expects you to make.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Predictable Mistakes New Riders Make.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Take a Tour of Keanu Reeves Bike Collection & His Advice to New Riders

Normally, when we at AMERiders talk about motorcycle-riding actors, our go-to is Tom Cruise. The high-octane actor is well known for making his own stunts, leaving CGI and motion capture behind. Keanu Reeves, on the other hand, is a low-key badass who has shown some serious action chops, especially thanks to the John Wick movie series. Plus, the guy can ride! He’s not only had the chance to show what he got in movies—more recently in John Wick: Parabellum, but he’s also co-founded his own motorcycle brand. Now, you get a look at his collection and spin the Arch Motorcycle garage.

He starts off his GQ interview by asking how many bikes you need to own to be called a “collector”. In my opinion, “more than you can ride at once” is a good place to start, so two bikes and over is the start of something truly wonderful if you ask me. If we stick to that very personal definition, that makes Keanu Reeves a legit motorcycle collector. He has two pretty special bikes.

The first one he discusses and shows us around is his black 1973 Norton Commando 850 MKA2, which he said he bought in 1987. He explains that he grew up loving Nortons—can’t blame him! The second bike he owns is of course The Matrix Reloaded dark green 2004 Ducati 998 Reloaded Edition—a color specially prepared by the manufacturer in honor of the movie franchise.

During the interview, he lists some of movies he’s had a chance to ride in, including Chain ReactionMy Own Private Idaho (in which he rides on a yellow Norton), and, of course, John Wick: Parabellum. I recent trailer shows that a fight between good and evil will take place in the saddles of a fleet of Yamaha MT-09.

As the proud co-owner and co-founder of Arch Motorcycle, a motorcycle-oriented interview with Keanu Reeves wouldn’t be complete without a few words about his motorcycle brand. He explains how what started off as the customization contract for a Harley-Davidson Dyna Wide Glide with Gard Hollinger’s shop turned into the prototype of what would turn into Arch Motorcycle’s KRGT-1 bike. He discusses how the company itself builds over 200 machined aluminum components for the bikes and how other components including the suspension, exhaust, and engine are sourced from different other manufacturers. He then introduces us to the Arch 1S, a sportier iteration of the GT with a slightly more aggressive riding posture.

Finally, Reeves shows us the Method 143 concept bike that uses a carbon fiber monocell chassis, a striking futuristic design. What’s on his motorcycle bucket list he has yet to do or own? Reeves lists owning a 1955 Vincent Black Shadow, and a Brough Superior of some sort as part of the list, as well as the experience of riding on a MotoGP bike. Now we feel like we just want to hang out with the guy.

Psst… the chase is at 2:00.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Keanu Reeves

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with Keanu Reeves Bike Collection & His Advice to New Riders.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.