It’s That Time of Year That You May Need to Replace Some Riding Gear!

Spring is rolling in and that means that it may be time to replace some riding gear. For us, at AMERiders it also means inventory as well, not just counting old but receiving new and exciting items in for you as well. When Spring rolls around it is time to check not only your bike and get it ready to ride for spring. But to do a check-up of your gear as well.

Start with your Head

When checking your gear out for Spring make sure to go from Head to Toe. Start with that Helmet make sure that if your (lid, brain bucket, or whatever you call your helmet) is older than 5 years, replacing it is something you might want to consider doing.

Most of the helmet manufacturers will tell you that glues, resins and other materials that are used in manufacturing a helmet can break down over time. Things like hair oils, body fluids, and cosmetics, as well as normal “wear and tear” can all be contributors to this breakdown. Plus, every five years there are great advances in materials, designs, production methods and the standards that go into making and manufacturing helmets.

Also, there is the if you drop it you need to replace it bit. You may have heard some of your brothers and sisters say….”I heard that if a helmet hits the ground, it should be replaced.” This old biker’s tale isn’t necessarily true, but it isn’t really false either and it can get expensive. If you dropped your helmet on the garage floor don’t break out your wallet yet. You don’t necessarily need to replace it. Look at the manufacturer’s specs. If it says to replace it, follow instructions.

However, a common practice with today’s helmet technology is that if it’s not visibly cracked after it’s been dropped, then you don’t need to replace it. The problem with that is that you can’t see what is on the inside. If you are worried take it to someone you can trust to have it checked. If your reliable someone says to replace it then there is your first cllue that you may be on the road to Replace Some Riding Gear this spring.

Next your Chest and Hands

A good Jacket is especially important you want it to fit a bit loose in caseyou want it to fit over heavierr clothes and there are many other things that go into choosing a jacket. Check out our Jacket post here for information on that.

Replace Some Riding Gear

The amount of protection a jacket will give you is also relevant to how well it stays put when coming in contact with a road surface. The best solution to this problem is to purchase a jacket with any type of adjust-ability in the waist area, like a belt or zippers, and if possible, “gaiters” on the sleeves — that allow you to tighten them against your arms.

Your hands are just as important as you are, you know this as of you don’t have your hands you can’t ride the bike. Gloves are so much more than “something bikers wear to look the part.” In spring, finding the right motorcycle gloves to start your season is important. The type of glove is important whether Summer or winter gloves will depend on how chilly your Spring actually is in your area of the world.

Replace Some Riding Gear

Your hands are delicate, and fragile even, and anyone that has either broken, burned or had something happen to a hand knows that not being able to use that hand until it heals really sucks. So ensuring that your hands are protected by a pair of leather gloves even fingerless ones (which some guys prefer) is important.

Gloves are very important, you can also think of it this way… Anyone that is military or that has a military background will know if you are injured in the leg, of course, you can’t stand but you can still shoot your weapon. Arms and hands that are injured can possibly impair you from firing said weapon, essentially becoming combat ineffective. read more here.

Legs

Replace Some Riding Gear


The battle lines are drawn. More often than not Americans will don chaps, however, European and Japanese motorcycle fans seem to wear full riding pants. Is that the only difference? If you throw your leg over a Triumph cafe bike, do you have to only wear leather riding pants? Or if you’re on a Road King, is your only option chaps?

Replace Some Riding Gear

No, course it isn’t it’s your bike it is your choice in what you wear on your legs. When Spring hits, it may be a bit chilly so you’ll naturally have gear. But as the weather warms, you might be inclined to shed the layers. There’s no law against not wearing chaps or pants, but keeping safety and of course comfort in mind. Chaps and riding pants are definitely a safety choice when it comes to riding.

Last but certainly not least

Replace Some Riding Gear

Boots! Your feet are what help you hold the bike up. They need to have good soles and great tread and needs to at least be waterproof as well as come up over your ankles in case the bike does go over they help to keep your ankles from being totally crushed.

The Bottom Line

As spring blossoms, your gear will help keep you warm and safe. Be sure to prepare for changing climates as well as finding your personal style. AMERiders has plenty of all of the above available for you here. Questions that you do need to ask yourself before you set out on your ride. Do your gloves need to be replaced? How is the tread on your boots? How old is your helmet and how many times has it been dropped? Think about these things and more before you set out on your ride. This is why we remind you to Replace Some Riding Gear.

OHHHH and ……..

In the next coming weeks we will be adding in our new stock of items for you so keep looking to the blog and front of the site to see what we have added. We’ll let you know what has been added and where and we are not going to spring it all on you at once. But give it to you in little pieces this year.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Replace Some Riding Gear

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on new items incoming and a reminder of you might need to Replace Some Riding Gear.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

How Early Can I Start Riding My Bike This Spring? Is There a Too Early?

It’s that time of year again. All of us who live in climates where winter is a rotten snowy, icy thing, are currently chomping at the bit to get out and ride again (if we haven’t already). But when is your official start of the riding This Spring? AMERiders answers our readers questions.

Some localities have laws about when motorcycles can and cannot be on the road. Other places leave it up to the rider–if you want to ride all winter, more power to you!

I know someone that purchased a Kawasaki KLR 650 in 2010 specifically to use as their “winter beater” bike and rode it year round for three seasons. During the spring of the fourth, he realized his front brake was, at best, decorative. He dismantled everything to find the pistons seized in the calipers due to pitting and oxidation. While he had been careful only to ride when the streets were dry, he didn’t adequately rinse the bike and the dry, powdery road salt got into his brakes and wrecked them.

So when someone asks us, when is the right time to blow out the mothballs and take your bike out for the spring, our answer is, it depends!

How tolerant are you of rust and pitting on the shiny parts of your bike? How dedicated can you be to rinsing the bike off after every salty winter ride with a desalinization rinse? Are you OK with more regularly replacing or rebuilding parts like brake pistons? Do you have good cold-weather gear? Can your bike power heated gear without too much effort?

Black Friday Clearance Event

There are definitely other considerations for those early spring rides. You may get out for a nice afternoon ride, but have you looked at the weather report for the coming hours? The temperature often plummets in the evening and you don’t want to be caught out with inadequate protection. Keep an extra layer, a neck gaiter and maybe a very warm pair of gloves with you just in case.

While you’re on main roads the pavement may be clear, but lower-speed back roads can hang onto one heck of a coating of sand. Take it very easy turning onto your favorite back road in the early spring.

Does your municipality maintain its roads well, or are there crazy potholes to avoid? Remember that potholes hide in puddles, so even if it’s not raining or cold, those puddles can have some nasty rim-damaging surprises.

Also, how is your gear? Did anything need replacing last season that you didn’t get to? How old is your helmet?

motorcycle

Also, how is your gear? Did anything need replacing last season that you didn’t get to? How old is your helmet?

How is your head? Spring is a perfect time to get out and practice any skills that may have gathered winter rust. Get out to an empty parking lot and practice your hard braking and evasion skills–but check for sand on the pavement first!

Friends, what else do you look out for, on your first few rides of a new season?

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

This Spring

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on How Early Can I Start Riding My Bike This Spring.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Motorcycle Superstitions that may or may not be true and their explanations

It’s the beginning of the riding season. Along with the necessary post-winter prep, some people feel it’s just as necessary to attend a local blessing of the bikes and make sure their guardian bells are attached. These and other superstitions provide absolutely no tangible benefit to the motorcycle, but it makes the riders feel better, and who knows? Maybe there is some spiritual benefit that we can’t measure in tangible terms to these Motorcycle Superstitions. They may be true or they may not AMERiders gives some explanations.

Motorcycle riders can be a notoriously superstitious bunch. Perhaps it’s an extension of always being on guard against that dog, Prius, or school bus that cuts you off without seeing you. Whatever the reason, bikers hold many common beliefs that may or may not be rooted in fact. Here are a few of them to mull over that may or may not be true.

Blessing of the Bikes

Motorcycle superstitions

One of the first events of the year that many riders attend is a Blessing of the Bikes ceremony, often held in a local church parking lot. Since riders come from all spiritual paths, such ceremonies are usually non-denominational.

That includes religion, sportbike vs. cruiser, Harley vs. the world, etc. While there is no tangible proof that a blessing from Jesus, Mohammed, or the Flying Spaghetti Monster will provide any additional protection while you ride, every little bit helps, and I’m not going to sit here and tell you that it doesn’t.

Guardian Bells

Motorcycle superstitions

One of my personal favorite Motorcycle Superstitions and I have one for my husbands bike is the Guardian Bell. Along with bestowing good juju upon your bike, many also attempt to ward off bad juju with guardian bells. The legend goes that evil spirits try to latch onto your bike and cause mischief, mechanical failures, and crashes. A bell on your bike will attract these spirits, then trap them inside. The constant jangling of the bell drives them insane, at which point they let go and fall harmlessly to the ground.

Another important aspect of this ritual is that you may not buy your own guardian bell. You must receive it as a gift for it to be effective. This helps build friendship and camaraderie among riders. The only disadvantage I can see is if you ride a relatively quiet bike, and the incessant jangling of the bell drives you insane instead of the spirits.  If you need one you can get one here.

Riding With Rear Pegs Down

Another way bad spirits can hitch a ride is if your passenger footpegs are down, but you do not have a passenger. Spirits apparently view this as an invitation to hop on board and cause trouble. It’s not clear how well a guardian bell works in this case.

Also not clear is how it interferes with this being a common practice in a funeral motorcade. Since having your pegs down invites spirits, this is actually an open invitation for the spirit of the deceased to hop on and join you for one last ride.

Green Bikes

We’ve seen this covered on many sites and we’ll cover it soon, but to summarize, some believe that green motorcycles are bad luck. (Clearly, nobody’s mentioned this to Kawasaki.) The belief likely goes back to World War II. Messengers and scouts often rode army motorcycles, painted green, and were often targets for snipers and sharpshooters. 

Causation does not equal correlation, however. Another theory is that after the war, many army surplus bikes were sold to the general public. These were not always in the best state of repair when their new owners began to ride them, leading to unfortunate consequences. Needless to say, Kawasaki has proven that green bikes are not all bad, and are actually quite good…

Riding a Dead Man’s Bike

Now this is a Motorcycle Superstitions I can get behind! I believe in ghosts, there I said it I have seen them… so this is a good one for me. Some believe that it is bad luck to ride a motorcycle owned by someone who has died. They don’t have to have died while riding the motorcycle for this to be true. The idea is that if the deceased catch you riding their old bike, they’ll swoop down out of the blue and knock your butt right off it.

I once knew someone that owned this old Suzuki GS1100L. It was a full dresser in its past life. Then it suffered an unfortunate meeting with a moose, which of course it lost. The couple it was bought it from had bought the wreck and fixed it up as a naked bike, the fairings and baggage having suffered most of the damage. I have no idea how damaged the rider was in that crash, or whether they made it out alive. I do know that regardless, my friend never crashed that bike themselves.

Dropping a Helmet

It’s often considered bad luck to wear a helmet that’s been dropped. I don’t know where this superstition came from, but it’s one of the few that is absolutely true. Motorcycle helmets are designed to protect you against one big hit.

When you drop a helmet, it can’t tell whether the cat knocked it off the table or this hit is was a bad crash. Either way, plastic can crack, the foam can compress, and the helmet won’t provide as much protection as it did before the hit. So do yourself a favor and be very careful not to drop your helmet.

Not Stopping To Help a Fellow Rider

Motorcycle superstitions

Finally, it’s considered bad luck if you see another rider on the side of the road, and you do not stop to check and make sure they’re okay. They may be broken down, out of gas, or simply taking a quick drink, but superstition says you should stop and check on them anyway.

I have no idea what luck has to do with it, but it’s an excellent practice that I follow regardless of superstition. I’ve also been thankful when other riders stopped to check on me, whether I needed any help or not. We have to watch out for each other out there.

However, you know what I’m really superstitious about? A soccer mom, in a massive SUV. She’s usually either texting or talking on a cell phone, while her kids bounce around in the back fighting or playing video games. She’s so oblivious to everything on the road that she never, ever sees me on my motorcycle. That’s what I call my bad luck omen.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Motorcycle superstitions

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Motorcycle Superstitions and our explanations of them.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Women Ride like the Wind, and Why Shouldn’t We!

A group called The NE Wind Sisters help women in the northeast U.S. to connect and ride together.

You would think with more women riding their own motorcycles than ever, that riding alone or in male-dominated groups would be easier for them to do now. However, some still feel hesitant to ride alone, or in the typical male-dominated groups. Some don’t even feel comfortable leaving their own towns. AMERiders explains from some information they found on the net.

Alison Parker was one of these women until an experienced woman rider took her on a 150-mile road trip, which revealed to her the true joy of riding. Parker now runs the NE Wind Sisters Facebook group, “a group created by women riders, for women riders, who live in the northeast of America, and want to ride with the girls some of the time.”

The group started in November, with 20 like-minded women talking amongst themselves. The concept has proven to be enormously popular, with the group exploding to 600 members over the winter, which isn’t exactly riding season for most in the northeast.

Parker says “One of the main things the group is about is to help women meet women in their local areas, We have members all over New England and even down into New York and New Jersey. There’s a real mix of new and more seasoned riders in the group. It’s amazing how many women my age are starting riding for the first time. We are a group of women who all share the same passion.”

The group, and its accompanying Facebook page, already have a number of rides planned for this year, although dates are still tentative at this time.

They also have had what Parker called her ‘shout out’ rides”. ” This means someone may post asking if anyone wants to ride that day, and then others respond. Parker says that she has even ridden to meet girls just to go do some parking lot practice, which she says is a lot of fun. “I love it and want to encourage all women who want to ride. We all help each other gain confidence, and there is a certain kind of confidence one gets when you climb on a motorcycle.”

There you have it ladies… If you are having doubts get together with other ladies and ride don’t be afraid. Things are always better in numbers. Make it a ladies day out .. Instead of a ladies night out.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Harry Potter

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Women Ride like the Wind, and Why Shouldn’t We!

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Harley Davidson Appeals to the NextGen Riders with Electric Bikes for Kids

When we all said that Harley Davidson needed to appeal to younger riders, the electric-powered two-wheelers “EDRIVE ”isn’t quite what we had in mind, but we’ll take it! We at AMERiders give you an explanation of these new electric Bikes targeted for our younger bikers.

Harley Davidson announced this week (on 3/6) that it has acquired StaCyc, Inc., a company that produces “stability cycles” more commonly known as “push bikes” for kids. They are electric-powered two-wheelers made just for kids called “EDRIVE.”

Harley’s Senior Vice President of Marketing and Brand, Heather Malenshek, says “We’re thrilled to have StaCyc become part of the Harley-Davidson family. The StaCyc team shares the same vision we have for building the next generation of riders globally and we believe that together, we will have a significant impact in bringing the fun and enjoyment of riding to kids everywhere.”

The legendary company said the acquisition complements the upcoming LiveWire full-size electric motorcycle it is launching later this year. Which you may remember we gave you a bit of information on if not you can read about that here.

Harley to sell electric bikes for young bikers
The LiveWire is priced at $29,799. (Harley Davidson)

Founded in 2016, StaCyc describes itself as “a fun, upbeat kids’ brand,” which is a far cry from the loud, macho, outlaw image of its new parent company. If this move seems a bit off-brand, that’s because Harley is trying to expand its brand. The company has struggled to attract customers for its gas-guzzling “hogs” beyond Baby Boomer diehards, while also suffering from tariffs imposed by the EU in retaliation for duties introduced by the Trump administration. Harley expects to ship as few as 217,000 motorcycles in 2019, which would be the lowest total in eight years. It shipped 229,000 worldwide last year.

StayCyc has sold over 6,000 bikes since it was founded four years ago, and founder Ryan Ragland said in a press release that Harley-Davidson is offering all the support it needs to “carry out our mission to create the next generation of riders…”

StaCyc launched in 2016 with two different models, the 12e and 16e. The 12e is a 12” frame and the 16e a 16” frame; slightly larger and more powerful, but each can be operated as a traditional push bike in no-power mode until the child gets a feel for how the bike acts. The smaller bike is for kids with at least a fourteen (14) inch inseam and the larger for an 18” inseam.

Harley to sell electric bikes for young bikers

Parents will no doubt wonder where this will fit in their children’s pile of toys and how. It will appeal to many children’s need for speed and may allow parents to run or bike with their kids before they are able to keep up on their own. Thankfully to some that prefer our kid’s toys a bit quieter, the electric bikes are quieter than the piercing growl of the typical Harley. The sound that kids make when they open it up—the top speed on some StaCyc models is 11mph—is another matter. (as you can hear in the video below)

Along with the LiveWire, which has a starting price of $29,799, Harley-Davidson is planning a full lineup of electric two-wheelers that could eventually include scooters and mountain bike-type models.

Anything that gets kids more interested in motorcycling is a good thing in my book.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Electric Bikes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Electric Bikes for Kids.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Fox, StayCyc, Harley Davidson

Judge Carter Refuses to Strip Well Known Motorcycle Club of Its Logo

A patch or logo defines an MC (Motorcycle Club) and to have it stripped is like having your name, face or something else that defines you. So to have the government say you can’t wear it anymore is something that you want to fight back about. They have. Some of you, may or may not have been following this Federal Court case of the US v. Mongols Nation trial in the Federal District Court of Southern California, however, we did give you an update on the trial in January. Judge Carter has given his ruling.

During phase 3 of the trial it looks like things may be wrapped up. Judge Carter issued this albeit short but direct decision today.“The First and Eighth Amendments to the US Constitution prohibit the Government’s request to forfeit the rights associated with the collective symbols. Accordingly, the Court DENIES the requested forfeiture of collective membership marks.”

An Explanation of the Decision

Federal District Judge David O. Carter issued a 51-page ruling on the case said the government’s strategy of trying to devastate the Mongols motorcycle club by confiscating its treasured Genghis Khan-style logo would violate the group’s First Amendment right to free speech and the excessive fines clause of the Eighth Amendment.

Mongols keeps its patch

Federal prosecutors have been trying for more than a decade to get at the Mongols’ trademarked logo, which they say forms the core of the identity of what they have called a motorcycle gang.

In December, a jury found the Mongol Nation guilty of racketeering, and in January, the jury decided the Mongols should be stripped of its trademarked logo in a verdict called the first of its kind, as they were
deemed a “Criminal enterprise“.

So, this decision by Carter has upended years of effort by prosecutors to weaken the Mongols.

But Judge Carter declined to order the Mongols to forfeit the logo until he had a chance to review their arguments and consider their free speech rights. “The Mongol Nation’s and its members’ right to express their identity through the noncommercial display of symbols constitutes speech subject to First Amendment protections,” Judge Carter wrote in the ruling released last Thursday. He added that the First Amendment bars the government from using forfeiture laws in racketeering cases “to chill this expression.”

Judge Carter further wrote that since the jury determined that the Mongols logo was forfeitable only on the racketeering conspiracy count, but not racketeering itself, taking away the insignia was an inordinate punishment.
What’s more, Judge Carter wrote, “There is no evidence that forfeiture of collective membership marks will lead to a less violent or capable organization.”

Carter rules Mongols keeps its patch
Motorcycles seized from the Mongols Motorcycle gang is on display during a press conference in Los Angeles on Oct. 21, 2008.
Ted Soqui / Corbis via Getty Images file

Carter wrote the jury found that the government “did not prove the requisite nexus between the collective membership marks” and the racketeering offense, but that the collective membership marks were forfeitable as to the racketeering conspiracy alone.

“The forfeiture of the rights associated with a symbol that has been in continuous use by an organization since 1969 is unjustified and grossly disproportionate to this offense,” the judge wrote. “To hold otherwise sets a dangerous precedent that enables the Government to target the associative symbols of organizations it chooses to prosecute for RICO conspiracy.”

He referenced past RICO actions brought by the government against the International Brotherhood of Teamsters over the influence of organized crime, and noted that the Teamsters’ still own the mark and the symbol is used by its more than 1 million members today.

The Mongols organization still faces sentencing on the two racketeering counts, and the government has said it could seek fines of up to $250,000 on each count, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. A sentencing hearing is scheduled for April 24, according to Thursday’s ruling.

Donald Charles Davis, who writes the biker blog “The Aging Rebel,” said that he felt Judge Carter’s ruling was “inevitable.”

“The government’s ambition was blatantly unconstitutional,” Mr. Davis said. “The government sought to turn symbols like the Mongols insignia, the club’s name and sentiments associated with the club like ‘Support The Mongols,’ into contraband.”

Judge Carter’s ruling was drawn from a flood of legal opinions that were submitted by academics, law firms and think tanks. He upheld the Mongols’ convictions on racketeering and racketeering conspiracy, and tentatively granted the forfeiture of the various weapons and property that had been seized.

Mongols keeps its patch
A seized Mongols patch and vest is on display during a press conference in Los Angeles on Oct. 21, 2008.
Ted Soqui / Corbis via Getty Images file

Yanny, the attorney representing the Mongols, said the group does not commercialize the logo, and people who use it must be members of the club.

“These are hardworking members of society,” Yanny said. “You’ve got everything from garbage men to drug counselors in that club.”

David Santillan, the national president of the Mongols, pumped his fist into the air as the decision was read before a courtroom audience that included several Mongols members.

“He upheld our constitutional rights, not only as the Mongols motorcycle club, but as citizens,” Mr. Santillan said. “A big weight has been lifted off the club’s shoulders.”

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Harry Potter

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Judge Carter and his Refusal to Strip the Mongols MC of Its Logo.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Indian and Jack Daniel’s Make Yet Another Co-branded Motorcycle in 2019

Why are we at AMERiders not surprised that for the fourth consecutive year, Indian and Jack Daniels are building yet another co-branded motorcycle in 2019? They have been close business partners for the past several years. With the help of Klock Werks Custom Cycles, they have released a number limited-edition Jack Daniel’s brand models. on Thursday, February 28th, the Milwaukee Business Journal reported that this trend will continue for 2019.

This will mark the fourth year that the companies have worked together in an unlikely, yet appropriate partnership. In 2016, they built 150 unique Chief Vintage and Springfield motorcycles to commemorate Jack Daniel’s 150th anniversary. For 2017, they released an even more limited run of 100 Chieftains. Then, last year, they built 177 Scout Bobbers.

“For the fourth consecutive year, the two iconic American brands have joined forces with Klock Werks Kustom Cycles, and this year they will pay tribute to those passionate craftsmen with an ultra-premium limited edition motorcycle inspired by Single Barrel Select, Jack Daniel’s most finely crafted whiskey offering,” says the announcement on Indian’s website.

Indian also released a video that says virtually nothing about motorcycles, instead focusing on Jack Daniel’s craftsmanship of their whiskey barrels. No doubt Indian wants to tie its extremely limited runs of branded motorcycles to Jack Daniel’s single-barrel limited runs of whiskey, each of which offers a unique and highly exclusive experience.

Part 1: The Barrels

This video provides absolutely no details about what this year’s special whiskey bike offering will be. It does say that the details will be released on March 9. Also, the video is titled “Part 1: The Barrels.” This implies that additional parts may be coming, leading up to the unveiling in two weeks. Will these give away any details to tease us, or will they play their hand close to the chest, not giving us any clues? We’ll have to see. Either way, we’ll know what’s up on March 9.

Given the experience from a year ago and from past Jack Daniel’s-branded Indians, this year’s model should be a hot seller. In 2017, when the whiskey brand was placed on a limited-edition Indian Chieftain bike, the motorcycles sold out in about 10 minutes. The inaugural Jack Daniel’s bikes were limited-edition Indian Chief Vintage and Indian Springfield models rolled out in 2016.

Just like last year, there will apparently only be 177 units of the 2019 Jack Daniel’s Indian to be produced, based on visuals from the video. Indian, Jack Daniel’s and Klock Werks will introduce the Single Barrel Select motorcycle March 9. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

        ~AMERiders

and

Indian

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Indian and Jack Daniel’s Make New co-branded motorcycle for 2019.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Could a Cell Phone Ban in Your State Save Your Life?

Motorcycle fatalities are down in states that have bans on handheld cell phone use. 

Bans on cell phone use while driving are having a positive effect on reducing motorcycle fatality rates, according to a recent study by Florida Atlantic University and the University of Miami. AMERiders looks into cellphone bans and whether or not they could save lives.

The study actually intended to focus on overall traffic fatality rates involving cell phone use while driving. When it comes to car-to-car crashes, it’s not clear that partial or total bans on cell phone use while driving has had any effect on fatalities.

This could be explained by the high level of crash safety built into modern cars. It’s possible that the number of crashes may still be higher in states without cell phone bans, but the cars involved are doing a good job of protecting their occupants from death.

Such is not the case when it comes to motorcycles, however. To the researchers’ surprise, data from the study reflects that. States that have either a partial or total ban on cell phone use while driving have as much as an 11 percent reduction in motorcycle fatalities compared to states with no ban at all. This likely comes as no surprise to those of us who regularly battle inattentive traffic on two wheels, but it’s great to get some quantitative statistics to back up our subjective experiences.

The researchers of this study argue that policymakers should consider strengthening texting and handheld cell phone bans, as well as enforcement, to improve safety and save motorcyclist lives. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, using a hand-held cell phone while driving is illegal in just sixteen states plus Washington, D.C. as of December 2018.

Some states are in the process of implementing such bans, while others are being held up in the legislature. In my home of Florida, for example, a bill has been filed for the 2019 legislative session that would allow law-enforcement officers to pull over motorists for texting or talking on hand-held cell phones while driving.

Rep. Jackie Toledo, R-Tampa, filed a measure (HB 107) in December that would prohibit drivers from talking on cell phones that are not hands-free devices and would make enforcement a “primary” offense.

Rep. Jackie Toledo said “Currently, texting while driving in Florida is prohibited, but it is enforced as a “secondary” offense. That means motorists can only be cited if they are stopped for other infractions, such as running stop signs or speeding.

A proposal in the 2018 session did not advance in the Senate because of concerns about issues such as minority drivers facing increased racial profiling. SB 76 which is similar to Toledo’s new proposal has been filed by Sen. Wilton Simpson, R-Trilby, for the 2019 session, that starts in March.

Under their bills, drivers would be able to communicate on hands-free devices. Also, motorists would be allowed to use hand-held devices for such purposes as reporting emergencies, getting safety-related information or for navigation.

In Massachusetts, its Senate approved a cell phone ban in June of 2017 the law has yet to pass because the legislation is concerned it would result in increased traffic stops of black and Hispanic drivers. At this time the bill is remaining “under consideration” as per DeLeo spokeswoman Whitney Ferguson.

These are examples of the difficulty of passing a hand-held cell phone ban in just two states. Perhaps this study will lend some credibility to the claims of improved safety with a ban, particularly when it comes to motorcyclists, and help get more such laws passed.

If you think that a cell phone ban could save your life or you are in favor of having one in your state make sure that you contact your congressman or woman to help them more voices can help.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

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cell phone bans

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information the cell phone ban and wehter it could save your life.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Sources: EurekAlertIIHS, Boston Globe, Orlando Weekly

Muggles Can Now Enjoy the Harry Potter Motorcycle Ride with Hagrid

Started looking into booking your next vacation? You might want to head to Orlando with or without the kids. There’s a new attraction in town and it taps right into our communal sweet spot and to check it out, all you have to do is head to the Harry Potter theme park. Bikes and magic: that’s right up our alley! AMERiders gives you the scoop er wand or whatever here ya go.

The newly named attraction, which will be located inside The Wizarding World of Harry Potter – Hogsmeade on the plot of land that originally held Dueling Dragons, is an Intamin-constructed family-friendly roller coaster. 

Hagrid is the gentle giant who announces to Harry Potter that he’s a wizard before whisking him away in his flying sidecar. He sounds like our type of guy, right? While the bike isn’t clearly identified in the books aside from being a sidecar (from what I can remember—I don’t think J.K. Rowling cares too much) in the movies, big-guy Robbie Coltrane is put in the saddle of a modified, powder blue Royal Enfield Bullet 500, fitted with a sidecar to fly boy-hero Harry Potter around.

The track has no giant hills or upside-down loops, but does feature multiple launches and innovative maneuvers, including vertical and backwards segments, along with an indoor elevator-style drop. 

In keeping with the attraction’s title, the ride vehicles will be styled after Hagrid’s motorbike and sidecar. Guests will have a choice of sitting up on the motorcycle or settling down into the passenger seat. Along the way, guests will see “some of the wizarding world’s rarest magical creatures,” which are expected to be represented as animatronics (as opposed to 3D screens). 

The Universal Orlando’s The Wizarding World of Harry Potter theme park is getting a new attraction and starting on June 13, visitors will now be able to sit on a reproduction of the flying Bullet on the Hagrid’s Magical Motorbike Adventure ride. It was about time we got a proper motorcycle attraction!

There’s something undeniably family-friendly about a sidecar. Director Jason is a big fan and has even been seen taking his kids for a ride. We’re definitely all for an attraction revolving around a motorcycle ride, especially a magical one.

Universal set June 13 as the official opening date, but odds are good that unannounced technical rehearsal previews could happen in the days or weeks leading up to the debut day. The summer debut will give Universal’s ride several months in the spotlight before Walt Disney World’s anticipated Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge premieres near year’s end. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

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Harry Potter

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information about Harry Potter theme park’s new attraction Hagrid’s Magical Motorbike Adventure ride.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Orlando Weekly

Texas Bill (HB 748) , Will Close the Helmet Law Loophole

Texas Bill (HB 748) proposes a change that would enable police to stop helmetless riders to ensure they comply with the helmet law, AMERiders explains.

Let’s start with a quote and section from Tim Kreitz of the Superbike Blog which gives us a great bit of information.

“It’s a pretty safe assertion to say that motorcyclists don’t much like being told what to do. We tend to be iconoclasts, rebels, and eccentrics of varying degrees. We’re thrill seekers. We don’t hop onto the back of fast, high-powered, 2-wheeled contraptions to feel safer. In some ways, we do it to experience those very zen moments and feelings that come from accepting and managing higher levels of risk. To paraphrase an old saying, by placing ourselves closer to the edge, greater is our awareness that we are alive.

With that philosophy in mind, I conducted an online poll of motorcyclists from their 3,000-ish Facebook friends to see how they felt concerning a new bill recently introduced the Texas (HB 748) which would close a twenty-year-old loophole allowing most of the Star State’s motorcyclists to ride without helmets. they prefaced the poll and thread with this message:

“Point of Curiosity: I’m interested to know what my motorcycling friends think of HB 748, which would make helmet usage mandatory in Texas. I’d like to get my thumb on the pulse of this issue among riders because I might write a piece on the subject. Also, if you don’t ride, what is your perception of motorcyclists who ride helmetless?”

The results of the poll after less than 24 hours of responses, as well as some of the associated comments, were thought-provoking. As of Feb 14, 2019, over 140 people had answered the poll, with about 35 percent in favor of compulsory helmet requirements. NOTE: The polling software is a Facebook feature and should in no way be considered empirical. Anyone could’ve taken the poll, motorcyclist or not. Still, the results were interesting, even if the sampled demographic happens to be wider than intended.”

With that said we thing as he says it does give ya something to think about.

Texas is one of many states that allow motorcyclists to ride without wearing a helmet. This freedom to ride with the wind in your hair comes with certain stipulations. Police currently do not have the authority to pull over riders based solely on not wearing a helmet, which means that many people ride bare-headed in violation of these stipulations without getting caught. A proposed bill in the Texas legislature would close this loophole and allow police to stop riders solely for not wearing a helmet.

Naturally, we encourage riders to wear helmets, and riding gear in general, at all times. But we also recognize the right of riders to forego protection in places that don’t require it by law. Texas is a bit wibbly-wobbly in that way. The Lone Star State will allow you to ride without a helmet, but only under certain conditions:

  • The rider must be 21 or older.
  • The rider must have completed a motorcycle safety course.
  • The rider must carry adequate health insurance.

However, riding without a helmet without complying with these conditions is only a secondary offense, meaning that police may not stop a rider solely for not wearing a helmet. This means that as long as helmetless riders don’t grossly violate other traffic laws, they may ride helmetless with impunity, regardless of whether they meet these qualifications or not, and police can’t do anything about it.

Texas HB 748 barely changes the existing law, but the change it does make is significant. It empowers police to stop helmetless riders to ensure that they meet all of the qualifications necessary to legally leave the helmet at home.

While we should all agree that wearing a motorcycle helmet is a good idea, allowing police to any helmetless rider for nothing other than not wearing a helmet does seem to be a bit of government overreach. It adopts an attitude of guilty until proven innocent, since the rider who gets stopped must prove their age, their course completion, and their health insurance coverage. While these are all very reasonable stipulations, riders who comply with the
helmet law w now stand to be stopped regularly, which is inconvenient if nothing else.

Some may argue that if riders don’t want to be inconvenienced by frequent traffic stops they don’t deserve, they should just put on a helmet. If Texas is going to make life so difficult for helmetless riders, why don’t they just mandate helmets for all riders like several other states already do?

The law would be cut and dry, and police would have good reason to stop helmetless riders since there would be no question that they would be violating the helmet law. The proposed solution seems to just make more work for everybody for no discernable advantage for anyone.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

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Helmet Law

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Texas Bill (HB 748), Will Close the Helmet Law Loophole.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.