This Package Truck Is the Coolest Harley We’ve Ever Seen at Auction

The Package Truck was the Motor Company’s second commercial truck-type vehicle. Back in the 1910s, using motorcycles as commercial vehicles just made sense. It was a lot easier to take them down rural, rutted roads—a fact proved by the Milwaukee U.S. Postal Service mail carriers that tested Harley prototype motorcycle trucks over the harsh Wisconsin winter of 1912 to 1913, according to Riding Vintage.  We here at AMERiders think that this Package Truck is the coolest Harley we’ve ever seen at auction.

Those posties used Motorcycle Trucks, which were a bit different from this Package Truck. The MT units featured cargo boxes that rode on two wheels out in front of the rider, visually similar to how some pedal-type ice cream trucks look in our modern era. At the time, Harley took what it learned from those MTs when it discontinued them in 1914, and adapted its sidecar rig to haul.

Gallery: 1916 Harley-Davidson Model J Package Truck

The result was perfect for companies to paint with their names, slogans, services—basically, it was a great rolling billboard as riders took their deliveries around town. Harley offered custom sign lettering, or companies could opt to do the work themselves. What’s more, the sidecar cargo unit was easily removable so you could just use the bike on its own at your leisure. The concept proved so successful, Harley kept making Package Trucks until 1957. 

For its 100th birthday, this particular 1916 example had a complete and very detailed restoration over the course of 2015 and 2016. Amazingly, it’s one of only two known Package Trucks to retain its original electrical system, per Bonhams. It has a “very rare Remy magdyno” and its original hand-blown headlamp bulb intact, as well—and the headlamp actually still works. 

Poring over vintage photos of old Package Trucks, there were some amazing creations that businesses used back in the day—but seeing this exquisite paint job and restoration in full color is an absolute treat. Bonhams estimates it will go for around £25,000 to £35,000, or US $32,000 to $45,000 when it crosses the auction block at the Spring Stafford Sale from April 25 through 26, 2020. 

I don’t know about you but I would love to have this bike in my collection. Collection who am I kidding we only have 1 bike at home. Still would be a great bike to start off a collection with, am I right? Now anyone want to lone me 40k?

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Harley-Davidson Package Truck.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Sources: BonhamsRiding Vintage

4 Weekends, 4 Locations, 4 Times the Fun for the WSR 15th Anniversary

Four Different Weekends, Four Different Locations, Four Times the Fun! No way! Yes, Way! It is the WSR 15th Anniversary and they couldn’t do it half-assed they had to do a wild one and just one rally wouldn’t do they are holding 4 count them four separate Women’s Sportbike Rally events planned for 2020. AMERiders is all for Women Riders and we have the info here for you about the rally.

The best part about a good motorcycle rally is getting a bunch of moto-enthusiasts together to ride and enjoy each other’s company. The worst part, of course, is that as we make friends who live far away much more easily now (thanks, Internet), having a cool gathering that’s super hard to get to is extra frustrating. Besides it being WSR 15th anniversary that is another great reason to have four separate Women’s Sportbike Rally events planned for 2020.

Full schedules for all four rally weekends haven’t been posted yet, but registration for all four opens on March 20, 2020. Women riders and male companions who sign up as guests of those women riders are welcome to attend. All skill levels and sportbikes of any displacement are welcome. Here are the dates and locations so you can start planning:

  • WSR NorCal in Petaluma, California: June 26 through 28, 2020
  • WSR SoCal in Temecula, California: July 24 through 26, 2020
  • WSR Mid-Atlantic in Winchester, Virginia: September 4 through 7, 2020
  • WSR Deals Gap in Deals Gap, North Carolina: September 11 through 13, 2020

If you’re a woman who’s interested in riding but haven’t taken the leap yet, don’t worry! The WSR is here for you, too. If you’re interested in sportbike riding, you’re welcome to go, learn, ask questions, and get a feel for what might be the new love of your life. Men, women, and children are also welcome as guests of women who have signed up to attend. 

WSR

Although schedules aren’t posted yet, you can expect things like courtesy safety checkups on your bikes, ergonomic and suspension clinics, group rides, and probably also some demo events. Food and lodging should be pretty free-form, so you camp, stay at an Airbnb, or just about anything you feel like planning. The main focuses are fun, safety, and sportbikes. If that sounds like you, check out the official website and follow WSR on all your social media platforms of choice to stay up-to-date.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the WSR’s 15th Anniversary Rally.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: WSR

Ewan McGregor Finally Talks About the Long Way Up With H-D’s Livewire

Who says electric motorcycles can’t be used for long-distance touring rides? Actor Ewan McGregor won’t that is for sure. The way he tells it, it’s almost easy – or at least comes with only some minor difficulties. The Actor Finally Talked About his latest adventure, Long Way Up With H-D’s Livewire. AMERiders gives you the skinny.

From September to December of 2019, twelve years after The Long Way Down, our favorite TV duo of motorcyclists was back in action. This time, Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman headed northward from the southernmost tip of Argentina up to Los Angeles for their latest adventure, The Long Way Up. 

The documentary has yet to air but after a few weeks of silence, we finally get a glimpse of how things went down in a brief interview with McGregor himself.  We expected to only receive more information once a trailer for the series was ready.

As part of the adventure, Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman rode Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycles on what was probably the bikes’ longest trip yet. While the ride was completed at the end of last year, we haven’t heard much about it yet.

Sitting across The Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon, McGregor briefly discussed his adventure with pal Charley through South and Central America. Since the trip wrapped up at the end of this past December, there’s been a deafening silence about how things went. After confirming everyone made it safely to L.A., everyone on the crew went MIA, as though nothing happened. We’ve been particularly curious about this trip since the team opted for a pair of electric motorcycles—Harley-Davidson LiveWires to be specific—instead of the usual BMW GS, something McGregor describes as “amazing and quite tricky at the same time.”

While we’ll probably have to wait until the documentary airs to get the full picture, McGregor spoke up about some of the challenges they faced, including running out of “juice”.

He also describes how they had to ask locals to charge their bikes and how charging two bikes sometimes meant (literally) blowing a fuse. He, however, commented on the people’s generosity which, from the sound of it, greatly contributed to making the adventure a success. 

As McGregor detailed:

There’s no real infrastructure for charging in the middle of Patagonia, for instance. So we’d just knock on people’s doors and ask if we could plug them in. They usually do let us. Sometimes we’d camp in their garden at night, and we’d plug in.

While most people would assume that running out of charge would be the biggest peril on a long-distance electric motorcycle trip, it was surprisingly rare. McGregor explained that it never happened to his riding partner Charley Boorman, though it did happen to him once or twice.

In that situation, McGregor explained that he was able to get an impromptu tow from a car by hanging onto the B pillar through the open window… a technique he apparently learned in New York City. That move likely isn’t found in Harley-Davidson’s official LiveWire owner’s manual, but it seemed to do the trick to get the bike to the nearest plug. Though considering the duo was supposedly traveling with Rivian electric pickup trucks as support vehicles, I wonder if there’s more to this story.

Of course, these types of issues aren’t as likely to occur in more developed nations where electrical grids are more robust and charging stations are more plentiful. However, the adventure seems to have demonstrated that electric motorcycles are capable of touring even in sub-optimal conditions, albeit with a bit of planning and creativity required at times.

The interview was shared on the show’s YouTube channel on February 1, 2020, but the meeting between Fallon and McGregor seemingly happened in December, possibly a few days following the end of the trip. Though he doesn’t reveal much else about the trip, it’s nice to finally hear someone from the team break the silence and open up a little about the adventure.

The Long Way Up series is bound to be fascinating, and now, we have to keep an eye out for an air date of The Long Way Up. When we hear of one we will let you know.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders tells about Ewan McGregor and his Long Way Up ride With H-D’s Livewire.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

The Big Opinion the Helmet Law: People Rally Against It in NH.

On February 4, 2020, over 300 people showed up at the Representatives Hall in Concord, New Hampshire, to speak up against proposed House Bill 1621-FN. That bill would make motorcycle helmets mandatory. The main argument? “Freedom” and “choice” according to the InDepthNH journalist that reported on the story. I have a question for you: should a toddler be allowed to roam free on a busy boulevard for the sake of freedom? AMERiders gives you a rundown on the issue, on The Big Opinion the Helmet Law.

The rational answer most of us should have to this is no. Why? Let’s all say it together: because the kid’s safety is more important than his perception of freedom. He’ll probably throw a tantrum because he’s being held back and is kept from doing something he chooses to do, but as an adult, you know better. So you force him to hold your hand and to stay put because a tantrum is better than getting run over by a car. 

Why can’t the lawmakers do the same with the helmet law? Why is perceived freedom more important than safety? Why are seatbelts and airbags mandatory in cars but we allow naked people to ride on motorcycles? Yes, I really mean entirely naked. Look it up, it’s a thing. 

We want to legalize lane splitting and lane filtering to make the roads safer and we are quick to blame the “cagers” for our woes, yet, we’re not willing to take basic steps for our own safety. Something safety starts with ourselves. 

helmet law
Wearing a helmet doesn’t mean you can’t look sharp doing it.

You too can look sharp in a helmet. You should try it.

A helmet isn’t entirely foolproof. By that, I mean that whenever you head out on a motorcycle, there is nothing out there that will give you a 100-percent guarantee that you won’t get hurt or worse, die. That’s part of the reasonable risks we accept when riding a motorcycle. There is, however, an overwhelming amount of data that proves that certified helmets reduce the risks of head injuries. It won’t prevent you from breaking an arm but isn’t a broken arm better than a broken arm and a concussion? 

It’s like texting and driving. People always think they can get away with it until something really bad happens and their example is used as a PSA about why texting and driving is bad. The number of “I wish he had worn a helmet” we read in articles pertaining to motorcycle crashes and deaths is alarming. Interestingly, nobody brings up freedom when someone gets severely injured in a motorcycle crash. 

It’s all thoughts and prayers and crowdfunding campaigns to help pay for the medical bills. Oh yeah, because a crash isn’t only about a rider getting hurt. There’s a dramatic ripple effect that impacts the rider’s family. There can be loss of revenue—maybe even all the revenue if the significant other has to care for the injured—and there are hefty medical bills to pay for out of a pocket that already contains less money because, well, there’s a loss of revenue. Not only that, but a single rider’s freedom is also paid for by taxpayers’ money.

Rep. Jerry Knirk, one of the bill’s sponsors, used South Carolina as an example. “In South Carolina, they had a $10 million decrease to taxpayers when they passed a helmet law,” Knirk was quoted saying by the InDepthNH. “In New Hampshire, if everyone wore a helmet, (taxpayers) would save $3.6 million in direct costs.” 

The InDepthNH reporter also interviewed Representatives against the bill and their quotes make me want to bleach my eyeballs and move to a deserted island. “People have gone to war to fight for freedom,” said former state Sen. David Boutin, R-Hooksett. “We don’t need a legislative body taking our rights away.” I mean, imposing a helmet law is right up there with all the basic human rights violations those who “went to war” fought against, I agree. I wonder if anyone in the trenches refused to wear his mandatory protective helmet to exercise their right to freedom.

law
Helmet after crash

“Helmets don’t save lives,” former state Sen. Bob Letourneau said, “education does.” Education as in “look at all the numbers proving that helmets actually reduce the risks of fatal head injuries which is the leading cause of motorcycle fatalities”? Just asking. It’s for a friend. 

So many questions, not enough rational answers. In my state, you have to be 21 and have at least $10,000 medical insurance to not wear a helmet otherwise you have to stick one on your head. My hubby and I sometimes have ridden without them, Not very often though. It just makes sense to me but I just can’t wrap my head around this concept of “Live free or die”. I still feel quite free and content when wearing mine. I also feel safe and I am actively reducing the risks of becoming a social burden if I get into a crash. It’s ok if you don’t agree and you choose to be angry with me. I’ll go have my feelings checked in the hospital for free. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on The Big Opinion the Helmet Law: People Rallying Against It in NH.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Sources: InDepthNHRide-CTIIHSNHTSAInsurance Information InstituteThe Salt Lake TribuneLaborers’ Health & Safety Fund of North America


Lane Splitting Laws Where Are They or Are They Not in the U.S.

Wednesday we told you about 2 new states possibly entering the lane splitting law category. Today we are going to give you some more information on Lane splitting, lane sharing, lane filtering, shoulder surfing because there are as many laws as there are possible maneuvers and keeping track of everything can be a bit dizzying. Especially since the laws greatly vary from state to state. Worry not, we here at AMERiders try and keep up on them and let you know where you can do what. We’ve updated the map with the latest information about that so let’s have a closer look.

Over the past few years, there have been loads of bills introduced to legalize lane splitting and filtering. Some have passed, some have died, and some are still undergoing committee consideration.

There are many states that do not have written laws explicitly forbidding lane-splitting but the maneuver is not quite specifically legal either. It is up to the discretion of every police officer you pass whether they are letting you get away with it or they are having a bad day. Here’s a handy graphic for you, on which states have what laws. 

Keep in mind that while these particular riding techniques may be legal where you’re riding, you’re never under any obligation to perform them. It’s just an available option should you decide to proceed. 

laws
  • RED States: Lane splitting and filtering are specifically illegal.
  • ORANGE States: A bill to legalize lane splitting or filtering is being considered but the practice remains specifically illegal.
  • YELLOW States: Lane filtering or shoulder surfing is legal. 
  • GREEN State: Lane splitting is specifically legal. 
  • GREY States: Lane splitting is not specifically illegal, but neither is it legal. It is up to the discretion of local law enforcement.

All that said, let’s roll out exactly what’s going on where:

Arizona

After a first attempt at changing the law on the matter of lane splitting with Senate Bill 1007, an effort that ultimately fell through, Arizona is back in the lane splitting game. In January 2020, House Bill 2285, was introduced by Representative Noel Campbell to restart the discussions about legalizing the maneuver. The motion is currently being considered. 

California

This forward-thinking state has allowed motorcycles to lane-split for some time by dint of a vague “it’s not illegal” stance. In 2016, lane-splitting was made explicitly legal, making California the only state to allow it to such an extent. Yay, riding in California! Try it when you’re there; it works and it’s magical.

Connecticut

Lawmakers in the Nutmeg State are actively considering Senate Bill 629. If passed, would make both lane splitting and filtering explicitly legal. The bill has been introduced and referred to the Committee on Transportation but there’s been no movement since.

Hawaii

The Hawaiian islands made shoulder surfing legal for motorcyclists. Due to Hawaii’s narrow roads, lane splitting and filtering are often not an option, but motorcyclists are now permitted to ride the shoulder of the road when there is congestion.

Oregon

House Bill 2314 was referred to the Speaker’s desk. The proposition to make lane splitting legal there is in discussion. If it is approved, motorcycles would be able to travel between cars on roadways where the speed limit is 50mph or greater, and traffic is moving at 10mph or slower. If you live in Oregon and you support this, do contact your legislators and let them know.

Utah 

In March of 2019, Utah legalized filtering becoming the second state after California to formally rule on a motorcycle-specific maneuver. Lane filtering is not as permissive as lane splitting but can help motorcyclists avoid being tailgated.

Virginia

In January 2020, Representative Tony Wilt submitted House Bill 1236 to amend the Code of Virginia and allow motorcyclists to lane split in the state. The bill was referred to the Committee on Transportation.

Washington 

The West Coast state introduced a bill to legalize lane splitting in 2015 that ultimately fell through. In January 2019, lawmakers reintroduced it as Senate Bill 5254 and it’s currently in the hands of the Committee. It was reintroduced and retained in its current status on January 13, 2020. If you live in Washington, get on the phone.

Honorable Mention: Toronto

Honorable mention goes to the Canadian city of Toronto, where filtering throughout the city, as well as allowing motorcycles to “use reserved lanes” in some specific areas of the city, is all up for discussion with City Council Agenda Item MM43.53. This agenda item also includes a discussion about dedicated motorcycle parking zones, and of course how to enforce that, and the tax revenue that might be generated from the ticketing. Cheers, Toronto; keep up the investigation!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information Where Lane Splitting Laws Are or Are Not in the U.S.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Sources: Lane Share OregonWUSA9KIRO7Stamford AdvocateAMAMotorcycle Legal FoundationCycleFish

Legalized Lane Splitting Is Growing in the U.S. What States Are Next?

Legalized Lane Splitting Is Growing in the U.S. California is the only state now, but other states have some form of it, what state is next to legalize? We have talked about lane splitting and lane filtering before. However, not many states in the U.S. allow it legally, in fact, California is the only one that has legalized lane splitting. Other states like Utah and Hawaii have similar laws but not the full lane splitting law. We wondered what states would be next and AMERiders found out that Arizona and Virginia may be the next ones. We have the low down for you.

While California is the only U.S. state that has legalized lane splitting for motorcyclists as of January 2020. Utah passed a law to allow riders to lane filter in 2019, while in Hawaii shoulder surfing has been legal in rush hour traffic situations since 2018. But wait! Could Arizona and Virginia soon join California on the elite list of lane-splitting-friendly states?

legalized lane splitting

Proposals to legalize lane splitting both in Arizona and Virginia were recently submitted to those states’ legislative bodies. According to Common Tread, the Arizona bill was introduced by Representative and Arizona House Transportation Committee chairman Noel Campbell, a former Navy and U.S. Forest Service pilot and a motorcycle tour guide. The law would allow riders to lane split on roads of more than one lane in the same direction with a speed limit of 45 mph or less and when traffic is cruising at no more than 15 mph. 

This isn’t the first time the State is looking into making the maneuver legal. A similar bill was introduced in 2017 but ultimately fell through. 

In Virginia, Representative Tony Wilt proposed a similar bill. He suggests allowing motorcyclists to lane split on roads of more than one lane in the same direction but traffic speed would have to be under 10 mph and motorcycles would be limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph. 

legalized lane splitting

There’s an ongoing debate about whether lane splitting truly is safer or not. Not being sandwiched between two cars in traffic sounds like the best scenario but let’s be real: if a driver is too distracted to stop in time to avoid rear-ending you, chances are they’re also potentially too distracted to spot you in their side-view mirror

At least if someone cuts you off while you are lane splitting, if you are being smart about it, you should be able to react in time. If a car is coming in hot behind you, with another vehicle in front of you, you don’t have as much leeway so ultimately, lane splitting might give you a little more control over your own safety. 

Thankfully, discussions to make the roads safer for motorcyclists are ongoing and every little bit counts!

Sources: Common Tread, ADV RiderCanada Moto Guide  

New Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee Eight 131 Crate Engine Is Full O’ Power

The New Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee Eight 131 Crate Engine will have you screaming like Scotty ” She’s giving ya all she’s got, Captain!” Customers have been It’s an exciting time for v-twin cruiser riders. Since customers have been calling for more performance-oriented models Manufacturers have been listening from Harley-Davidson’s revamping of its Softail lineup a few years back to Indian unveiling its PowerPlus engine found in the all-new Challenger. Harley-Davidson’s latest entry in the displacement wars comes in the form of a 131 cubic-inch (2,147cc) crate motor and is the largest engine Harley has ever offered. AMERiders loves that power!

The Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee Eight 131 Crate Engine is a bolt-in replacement for 2017 and later Harley-Davidson Touring models running an oil-cooled or twin-cooled Milwaukee 8. Yes, the name is quite a mouthful, but the 131 Crate Engine might also prove to be a handful with a compression ratio of 10:7:1 and high-flow fuel injectors that feed the beast at a rate of 5.5-grams per second.

While the new motor retains the 4.5-inch stroke found in the 114ci configuration, the 4.31-inch bore cylinders, 64mm throttle body, and high-lift camshaft improve the overall power output. Paired with Screamin’ Eagle Street Cannon mufflers, the engine produces 131 ft-lb of torque and 121 horsepower. While that’s a certifiably absurd amount of torque, the brand also emphasizes the reliability of a factory-built motor.

“Our adrenaline-seeking riders asked for thrilling power and torque with reliability,” said Harley-Davidson Product Manager James Crean. “The Screamin’ Eagle 131 Crate Engine delivers exactly that.”

Of course, there are aftermarket alternatives to the OEM’s upgrade, but none come with the 12-month or 24-month factory limited warranty that Harley offers. At $6,195 for the oil-cooled version and $6,395 for the twin-cooled motor, the assurance of a factory warranty will certainly provide some peace of mind for the costly investment. 

Offered in two finishes of black/chrome or black/gloss black, the motor will speak to the inner-bad boy or bad girl in every cruiser rider. Additional 131 Stage IV badging on the cylinder heads and timer cover also bestows customers with an unparalleled level of street cred. We should call out the fine print that an ECM calibration and Screamin’ Eagle Pro Street Tuner are required for proper installation—so start saving now. 

Unfortunately, the Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee Eight 131 Crate Engine doesn’t meet California noise and emissions standards, so you guys n’ gals in the Golden State won’t be wrangling Harley’s new monster anytime soon. On the other hand, if your butt dyno no longer registers the pull of your 114ci Milwaukee Eight, the Motor Company has 17 more cubic inches in its back pocket for you! 

Mmmmm….. It sounds like something I want to ride, even hear. I agree with some of the comments in the video, didn’t even give us a hint of what it sounds like which sucked. I want to hear it.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information about H-D’s New Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee Eight 131 Crate Engine.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Chapmoto.com , H-D,

Iconic Motorcycles That Have Defined and Changed Their Eras.

For more than a century, the Harley-Davidson name has been synonymous with motorcycles. Recently they unveiled their very first electric motorcycle, and its competitor Curtiss announced three new electric bikes. As a new era of motorcycles is rolling around we at AMERiders thought it was time to take a look at some of the iconic bikes that came before. Which have defined their eras and changed the way motorcycles were designed, built, and perceived.

Harley-Davidson WLA

An upgraded version of the WL that was refined for military specifications, the Harley-Davidson WLA was one of the unsung heroes of World War II and Korea. In fact, the “A” in WLA simply stood for the name of Harley’s newest and best customer: Army. A rugged, durable bike with a 740cc engine, Harley built around 90,000 of them for the Army during World War II. The Army used them for scouting, courier missions, and escort work. The WLA is the bike that forever enshrined Harley-Davidson as America’s motorcycle brand of choice and filled the ranks of the country’s biker culture with veterans returning home from war. Making it perfect to start our Iconic Motorcycles list.

For those that really want to know the model number breaks down as follows:

  • W: the W family of motorcycles. Harley-Davidson (except in very early models) gives a letter designation for each model family. The W series at the time was the newest incarnation of the 45-cubic-inch (740 cm3) flathead motor and was developed from the earlier R family 1932–1936.
  • L: “high compression”, in the usual HD scheme. The “low compression” W model was only briefly available.
  • A: Army. The company would also produce a model to the slightly different specifications of the Canadian Army, which would be named the WLC. The WLCs differed from WLAs chiefly in the use of some heavier components, usually Big Twin parts, as well as Canadian blackout lighting.

1938 Triumph Speed Twin

iconic

Legendary motorcycle designer Edward Turner unveiled the Triumph Speed Twin at the 1937 National Motorcycle Show. It was a watershed moment. Before the Triumph, big, air-cooled pushrod singles were the standard for British motorcycle manufacturers, but Turner’s latest creation represented the first legitimate British parallel twin. It set the standard for all bikes to follow and by the end of World War II, virtually every British manufacturer offered a 500cc like the kind pioneered by the Speed Twin.

1940 Indian Chief

First sold in 1922, the Indian Chief had nearly two decades of history under its belt by the time 1940 rolled around — but two things happened that year that divides the iconic “big twin” Indian Chief’s history into two eras: the time before 1940 and the time that came after. In ’40, the Indian Chief received two upgrades that made it famous. The first was a plunger rear suspension and the second was the feature for which it will always be remembered: its big, decorative fenders.

1923 BMW R32

The Treaty of Versailles at the end of World War I restricted German military production and banned Bavarian Motor Works from making aircraft engines, which had been the company’s bread and butter. BMW adjusted by making industrial and automotive engines, and in 1923, the company unveiled its very first motorcycle, the R32. It took that year’s Paris Motorcycle Salon by storm and the bike’s design and quality instantly ranked BMW as a premier motorcycle maker. And putting it on our Iconic Motorcycles list.

Norton Commando

During its decade-long production run from 1967-77, the British company Norton-Villiers captured the imagination of the motorcycle-riding world with the now-classic Commando, which quickly became renowned — although originally mocked by many — for its distinct swooping body. The air-cooled, OHV parallel-twin engine could push it up to 115 mph. It will always be remembered as one of the classic British twins.

1894 Hildebrand & Wolfmuller

The 1894 Hildebrand & Wolfmuller deserves a mention for one undeniable reason — it will forever be known as the world’s first production motorcycle. The company received a patent for its revolutionary four-stroke, two-cylinder engine and despite the fact that it had neither pedals nor a clutch, the 1894 Hildebrand & Wolfmuller stoked tremendous interest — and soon tremendous competition. It also stands out as the first time in history the word “motorcycle” was used to describe the soon-to-be familiar class of vehicles, only the company instead used the German word “Motorrad.” Thus lands it on our list of iconic motorcycles.

FN Four

iconic

Belgian firearms manufacturer Fabrique Nationale (FN) is credited with one of the most important innovations in the history of motorcycles — the inline four-cylinder engine, which came into vogue at the dawn of the industry at the turn of the 20th century. First built in 1905, the FN Four was the granddaddy of them all. The importance of the innovation can’t be overstated, and the new bike became one of the best-selling models on Earth during its 20-year production run. With a top speed of 40 mph, it also briefly held the title of the fastest motorcycle in the world.

Vincent Black Shadow

Auto enthusiast Jay Leno has stated that the Vincent Black Shadow is his favorite motorcycle ever made, and for good reason. Built from 1948 to 1955, the 998cc British motorcycle is known as the world’s first superbike. With a top speed of 125 mph, it was billed as the fastest production bike in the world at the time. Now that is iconic.

1949 Harley-Davidson FL Hydra-Glide

iconic

The FL chassis is still a best-seller today, and its genesis can be traced to a 1941 innovation by Harley-Davidson. Seven years later in 1948, the company rolled out the 1,200cc Panhead engine. In 1949, peanut butter met jelly when Harley-Davidson introduced a brand-defining bike that would be copied and imitated for decades. Named for the new hydraulic fork, which replaced the primitive springer fork, the iconic Harley-Davidson Hydra-Glide was born. Let’s face it Harley has a slew of iconic motorcycles.

1959 Triumph T120 Bonneville

1959 signaled the beginning of an era when the Triumph company unveiled the first of the famous Bonneville line. It was the last creation of legendary British motorcycle designer Edward Turner. The Bonneville was noted for several upgrades and innovations, but more than anything, it was popular because it was fast — probably the fastest production bike in the world at the time. In 1968, Evel Knievel almost died when he crashed a Bonneville attempting to jump the fountains at Caesars Palace.

Honda Super Cub

iconic

In 2017, a year before the Super Cub turned 60, Honda sold its 100 millionth unit of the four-stroke, air-cooled bike of the people. No other vehicle in the history of two-wheeled motorized transportation has ever broken the nine-figure mark. The vaunted Super Cub, which created a shift in how people perceived motorcycles and the people who ride them, is the best-selling bike of all time.

Brough Superior SS100

iconic

Known as the “Rolls-Royce of motorcycles,” the Brough Superior brand earned its reputation as the benchmark for luxury after World War I when the brand emerged in 1919. First launched in 1924, the SS100 cemented that reputation with its handling, durability, and power — it topped out over 100 mph. With each bike custom-built to buyer specifications, only about 400 were ever made, although, in 2017, a modern reboot/homage hit the market — the first SS100 to roll of the lines since 1940.

1984 Kawasaki GPz900 Ninja

iconic

In 1984, the Kawasaki company vaulted the motorcycle world into a brave new era with the production of the Ninja, and the GPz900 started it all. It was the first of the modern sportbikes. Since Kawasaki developed the Ninja in total secrecy, no one had ever imagined a 16-valve liquid-cooled inline four-cylinder engine before, but the secret soon caught on. The Ninja 900 was the first production motorcycle that could top 150 mph.

Harley-Davidson XR-750

Harley developed the XR-750 in 1970 in response to rule changes in the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) dirt track racing circuit. The new rules allowed for bigger, 750cc engines and removed restrictions on valve locations. That opened AMA to foreign competitors that for the first time posed a threat to Harley-Davidson, which had dominated AMA racing for years. Harley responded with the XR-750, which would go onto become the winningest bike in AMA history.

Royal Enfield Bullet

iconic

The British Royal Enfield company developed its first motorcycle in 1901, but crowds at the 1932 Olympia Motorcycle Show in London first witnessed the bike that would go on to define the brand. The Bullet, variations of which are still in production in India today, came in three engine sizes, 250, 350, and 500cc. A truly iconic motorcycle.

Norton Manx

The Norton Manx is named for the famous Isle of Man Tourist Trophy race, which a Norton bike competed in from the inaugural run in 1907 through the 1970s without missing a single race, a feat no other manufacturer matched. The Norton Manx was produced from 1947-62, although the Manx Grand Prix had come before, and the British racing bike soon became the bar for performance. Its twin-loop featherbed chassis would be the subject of countless imitators for years to come.

Honda CB750

iconic

2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the bike that made the in-line four-cylinder the preferred sportbike engine layout for a generation. Known worldwide as the original Universal Japanese Motorcycle, the Honda CB750 was the first motorcycle ever to be called a “superbike.” Its impact was profound. The first Japanese bike with an engine bigger than 650cc, the CB750 gave Japan its first high-performance model that could compete with American and British big-bike brands.

Yamaha Virago Gen 2

Yamaha unveiled the 1981 Virago to what the company expected would be great fanfare at a bike show in 1980. Company brass was shocked, however, to find that the bike was a flop among critics. It was an awesome new bike with innovations like a mono-shock rear suspension, but critics were underwhelmed, it never quite caught on, particularly when it came out that the starter was inherently flawed. Three years later in 1984, however, Yamaha tried again with the second generation Virago. The bike’s aesthetics and performance struck a chord, and Yamaha had one of the most enduring bikes in its brand’s history.

1977 Harley-Davidson FXS Low Rider

The ’77 FXS was the first Harley Low Rider, but perhaps more importantly, the moment signaled the beginning of the Harley-Davidson factory custom era. The wildly popular Low Rider, which gets its name from the fact that a mere 26 inches separate the seat from the road below, helped the company pull itself out of a decade defined by poor quality control and gave Harley bikes a new look and a new line that remained popular into the 21st century.

Ducati 916

2019 marks a quarter-century since the Ducati 916 redefined what a racing bike is supposed to look like. The 916, however, was more than just a stunning platform — it gets its name from the massive 916-cc V-twin engine that made it a champion on the track as well as an icon to riders. Team Ducati rode the 916 to more than 120 wins, including several World Superbike victories.

Honda CBR900RR

iconic

There was nothing that made the CBR900RR stand out from the sportbike pack when Honda debuted the new motorcycle in 1992 — nothing, that is except its weight. With a full tank of fuel, it weighed just 457 pounds — that was 75 pounds less than its next-in-class lightest competitor with most of the others forfeiting well over 100 pounds to the game-changing Honda. Thanks to the fact that it shed all non-essential parts, the CBR900RR would be considered a light bike even today.

Honda CT90

The tiny Japanese step-through known as the CT90 enjoyed a fantastic run from 1966-79. An evolution of the vaunted Super Cub, the CT90 rode to fame among off-road enthusiasts. That’s because its eight-speed transmission allowed it to go just about anywhere two wheels could ride, road or no road. The most practical dirtbike of its generation, the media affectionately dubbed the CT90 the “Pack Mule.”

Yamaha RD400F Daytona Special

The RD400 had been in production since 1976 when Yamaha unveiled the variation known as the Daytona Special in 1979. By that time, the two-stroke engine was clearly on its way out, and the RD400 had cemented its status as a four-stroke humiliating giant killer. The Daytona Special, however, built on that tradition and come to be known as the last of the great two-strokes and the bike that brought professional racetrack handling to the masses with a bargain-basement price tag.

1977 Kawasaki KZ1000

iconic

The Kawasaki KZ1000 was born out of necessity during the arms race that accompanied the superbike fever of the mid-1970s. The four-cylinder five-speed cranked out 90 horsepower, making it the fastest bike in an era defined by fast bikes. It was so fast and so dependable, in fact, that police departments used it as their motorcycle of choice into the first decade of the 21st century. A bike that the law enforcement love now that is an iconic motorcycle.

Confederate R131 Fighter

Although the company Confederate recently rebranded to become Curtiss, their motorcycles changed the way that bikes were built and how they looked from the time the company emerged in the early 1990s. Like all Confederates, the R131 Fighter was a love-it-or-hate-it motorcycle. Incredibly light but equally strong, the R131 was built from aircraft-grade aluminum and weighed less than 460 pounds. Powered by a huge 2,146cc engine, the R131 Fighter couldn’t possibly be mistaken for any other bike on the road.

And there you have it, folks, all these iconic motorcycles have defined and changed their eras in many different ways.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Iconic Motorcycles That Have Defined and Changed Their Eras.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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10 of the World’s Fastest Motorcycles Are Some Real Beauties.

Motorcyclists love speed and going fast, and we get that from our motorcycles. They offer us the wind in our face, the wild adventure we crave all the while giving us that exhilarating speed we need. As with each person, not every motorcycle is made the same, and just like us, some are prettier than others, while others will outperform others as well. AMERiders has looked for and found you 10 of some of the World’s fastest motorcycles and some real beauties.

This is one of the most sought after bikes in the US.

Bimota YB8 Furano

Fastest motorcycles

A very rare and sought after bike in the USA is the Bimota YB8 Furano. We start off this list with an imported bike because of its impressive history and timeless status. It came out in the early 1990s and has 164 horsepower.

It has won races across the globe and though not easily accessible to many riders today, if you were ever able to get your hands on one of them it would be an experience for sure.

This upcoming motorcycle is considered a flagship model.

CBR-1000 RR Fireblade

Fastest motorcycles

Considered a flagship sports bike made for the general masses, the CBR-1000 RR Fireblade brings the best and latest in bike racing technology to everyone who wants it. Some of the addons in the Fireblade include; wheelie control, rear lift control, engine braking, riding mode select system, power selection, and a new ABS gyroscopic mechanism.

The 2019 models weigh 195 kg making it lighter than the previous models released by Honda a few years ago but don’t let the weight throw you off. The CBR-1000 RR Fireblade is still one of the fastest motorcycles you can get.

Let’s Get Green!

2012 Kawasaki ZX-14R

Fastest motorcycles

In 2012, the Kawasaki ZX-14R held the record for having the fastest 1/4 mile racing time on the track and it would be years before that time was beaten. Though it doesn’t fall under the same name, the 2012 Kawasaki ZX-14R falls under the same umbrella as the Kawasaki Ninja which is known for its lightning speed.

Though not a lot of upgrades have been made to the 2012 Kawasaki ZX-14R since its 2012 release, Kawasaki is planning on making an update soon. The 2012 Kawasaki ZX-14R 1/4 mile time is currently 9.47 seconds with a speed of 152.83.

This upcoming Yamaha has a power to weight ratio of 0.25.

2020 Yamaha VMAX

Fastest motorcycles

Known for its popularity in street racing is the 2020 Yamaha VMAX. Over the years, Yamaha has added more upgrades to the bike’s engine to add more power to the wheels. It has a giant 1,679cc water-cooled V-4, that produces 174 hp and it gets 113 pound-feet torque.

A little heavier than some, the 2020 Yamaha VMAX comes in at 683 pounds but it has a power-to-weight figure of 0.25. Yamaha added some relaxed ergonomics to make the bike easier to control and more comfortable to ride.

This KTM model tops out over 155 mph.

2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke R

Fastest motorcycles

The 2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke R is not only a very fast bike, but it is one of the most popular. It doesn’t have the same forced-air induction like Kawasaki or bells and whistles as the RSV4 or S1000RR but is still just as fast

When tested at a Dyno, it topped out at 155 horsepower. The 2019 KTM 1290 Super Duke R has a 1,301cc liquid-cooled V-twin and 93 pound-feet peak torque while weighing 470 pounds and having a power-to-weight ratio of 0.33.

BMW wants you to go fast and comfortable in this rider-friendly model.

2019 BMW K 1600 GTL

Fastest motorcycles

Just because you are wanting to go fast doesn’t necessarily mean that you don’t also want to be comfortable and enjoy your ride as well. The 2019 BMW K 1600 GTL is the perfect bike for those riders who want the best of both worlds.

The 2019 BMW K 1600 GTL gets 126 hp and 106 pound-feet peak torque. It is heavier at 772 pounds but is worth the extra weight to carry all of the soft comforts that you need. The 2019 BMW K 1600 GTL also has a 0.16 power-to-weight ratio.

This upcoming bike is the only all-electric motorcycle on this list.

Lightning LS-218

Fastest motorcycles

The Lightning LS-218 in some aspects can be considered one of the fastest production motorcycles on the road. It isn’t called lightning for any reason although some motorcycle enthusiasts don’t care for the bike at all because it is electric.

The Lightning LS-218 has a top speed of 218 mph; the number that comes after the name. Some of the specs on the Lightning LS-218 include having 200 horsepower, 168 lb-ft of torque, and it goes 0-60mph in 2 seconds flat.

This next Kawasaki is far from being street legal.

Kawasaki Ninja H2R

Considered a hyper sports motorcycle, the Kawasaki Ninja H2R is also one of the fastest superbikes ever driven to date. The Kawasaki Ninja H2R is a track-only motorcycle and isn’t street legal because of its dangerous high speeds.

It has 300 horsepower and can go over 249 mph. It comes with a 998 CC supercharged inline 4 engine. Kawasaki included a dog-ring transmission on the Kawasaki Ninja H2R to improve faster and smoother shifting.

Dodge Tomahawk

The Dodge Tomahawk is the world’s fastest motorcycle ever produced and has a top speed of 420 mph. It was unveiled in 2003 with only 9 motorcycles sold since then.

The specs on the Dodge Tomahawk include its V-10 SRT Dodge Viper engine that has 8.3 liters. It can go from 0 to 60 in just 1.5 seconds and has a maximum horsepower of 500. One of the biggest differences in the Dodge Tomahawk is its wheel structure where it has two front and two back wheels.

The Guinness Book of World Records named this bike Most expensive motorcycle in production in 2004

MTT Turbine Superbike Y2K

The MTT Turbine Superbike Y2K was considered to be the “Most expensive motorcycle in production” by the Guinness Book of World Records in 2004. The bikes are not mass produced in continuous series; each unique bike is hand made to order after receiving the buyer’s specifications.

It features the Rolls-Royce 250 C18 turboshaft engine and has a maximum power of 320 horsepower at 52,000 RPM. The MTT Turbine Superbike Y2K has an impressive top speed of 227 mph and was manufactured from 2000-2005.

And there ya have it. There are many, many more and that is just 10 of them only a drop in the bucket.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on 10 of the World’s Fastest Motorcycles Are Some Real Beauties.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Royal Enfield Discontinues the Bullet and Thunderbird 500 Motorcycles

In November 2019, a rumor that Royal Enfield would discontinue its 500 models surfaced. If you’re a fan of the Bullet or the Classic 500, you might want to stock up sooner rather than later. We now learn that the rumor was true and several Indian sources confirm that the 500s are being pulled for 2020.  AMERiders explains.

According to the local media, without any bells and whistles, Royal Enfield removed the Bullet, Thunderbird, and Thunderbird X 500 from its Indian online listings with the Classic 500 expected to follow. The 500 segment was apparently a slow one for Royal Enfield, stuck between its two, more popular siblings. In fact, the 350s have been driving the brand’s local sales while the Continental GT and Interceptor 650 have been leading sales abroad since their introduction in 2018. 

The problem with the 500 models is that they had the same look as the 350s—minus the reduced price and taxes of the smaller displacement—and they didn’t quite stack up to the 650 Twins quality-wise. Besides, the 350s are getting thoroughly updated for 2020 with more features and “more refined performance”, making the aging 500s obsolete. Talk about a winning formula. 

Royal Enfield

Royal Enfield feels that, at this point, it wasn’t worth updating the middleweight engine to make it compliant with the new Indian emission standards. The manufacturer will focus on the 350 and the 650 Twins moving forward. 

A dealer commented that the discontinued models will remain available until March 31 or until all the units are sold—whichever term comes first. As for the popular Himalayan with its 400 engine, it was updated for 2020 which means it is likely safe from elimination, at least for now.  

The dramatic measures are expected to impact the markets worldwide, which means that Royal Enfield’s U.S. lineup could be narrowed down to only three models. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Royal Enfield

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Royal Enfield Discontinuing the Bullet and Thunderbird 500 Motorcycles.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.