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Bikers Rally in PA Capitol for Lemon Law and Procession Rights

Nearly 500 motorcycles converged on Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and the riders rallied inside the capitol building to push for motorcyclists’ rights, as they have done annually for sixteen years running. AMERiders gives you some information on the rally and the Lemon law.

Say what you will about A.B.A.T.E. (Alliance of Bikers Aimed Toward Education), but getting motorcyclists together in the guise of a party (free patches to the first 800 attendees!) to show lawmakers that motorcyclists exist, we vote, and we are politically active, is an amazing accomplishment. I know that there are A.B.A.T.E. chapters in every state, but I also know that many are not nearly as active as Pennsylvania’s chapter.

It’s difficult to get people out of their house and involved in politics of any stripe, but this is how we make change happen. In this case, this year’s cause was mostly Pennsylvania’s motor vehicle lemon law, which did not cover the purchase of motorcycles. This, they argued, would drive Pennsylvania residents to purchase motorcycles out of state so that they are covered if the machine turns out to be a lemon. It can certainly damage in-state sales numbers, but at its core, it is a protection for the state’s resident motorcycle purchasers and a correction of the oversight that does not include motorcycles in the “motor vehicle” lemon law. Attendees were encouraged to bring lemons with them (no word on whether they tossed them at the legislators).

This year’s rally also showed support for a bill which would allow motorcyclists involved in a charity or honor ride, to follow the same rules as a funeral procession. This would help prevent cars and other vehicles from cutting between motorcycles and creating dangerous havoc.

The rally initially focused on Pennsylvania’s helmet law, which in 2003 changed away from mandatory helmet use and now remains optional for riders over the age of 21. It continues annually to this day, to keep motorcyclists’ rights on the minds of PA state legislators.

Some riders attend to bring attention to issues like distracted driving and police profiling. All attend for the event and the camaraderie.

Are you involved in any motorcyclist rights organizations in your state? If so, how do you encourage political action and attendance at these events? Do you think it helps to gather a convergence of motorcyclists in front of lawmakers to make sure they keep our issues and our safety in mind?

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Bikers Rally in PA Capitol for Lemon Law and Procession Rights.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: PennLiveABATE PA

The Long Hair Conundrum: How to How Do I Keep It Contained?

The wind in your hair can lead to tangles and split ends, and we ladies and gents have a really hard time keeping our long hair from becoming a rat nest while riding. So AMERiders gives some tips to the Long Hair Conundrum and How to Keep It Contained?

I had long hair for years and suffered from the same problem after a long ride. Regardless of gender, those of us who let it grow long will often find a matted mess instead of a ponytail after a day on the road. There are some ways to avoid this.

I used to tuck my ponytail inside the collar of my jacket. Sometimes this worked, but rubbing around between layers of clothing caused its own problems. Half the time my hair popped out of the jacket anyway, leaving me right back where I started. Braiding works well for some but not for others.

Headband Braid

If your hair curls up or greases during motorcycle ride, you can solve the problem through headband braid. You can braid your hair on the hairline side allowing it to form a headband. Starting from one ear, you can tuck the excess hair behind one another and secure the remaining hair to form a ponytail and you can dismantle the hairstyle after you have finished your ride. Another easy way to do this is with a wrap.

long hair

Women’s Leather Ponytail Holder

Front Part Braids

This is another women motorcyclist’s hairstyle. This is a helmet-friendly style and many people use it. The hair is parted at the center and braided into two plaits at each side of your part. They are secured by pooling them together using a band. This method is also fun to use.

Bun

The perfect hairstyle for women bikers is the bun. There are different buns you can style your hair, they include the sock buns, ballerina buns, low buns as well as the side buns. You can enjoy this method once you learn the best way to remove your helmet. It takes time to master this style, but with practice, you can become perfect.

Head Scarves/Do rags.

This style is wonderful because apart from preventing hair loss, this style hides bad style. You can use a silk scarf or headband as it absorbs those frictions that could damage your hair. Preparing this hairstyle is not difficult, part your hair one side, and tie it with a scarf. Once you remove the scarf, you restore your hair by shaking and fingering it. Or you can use a do-rag which comes in a variety of looks.

long hair
American Flag Do-Rag Flydanna

Messy Locks

This is a sexy hairstyle for women motorcyclists. This is a helmet friendly method because it would not be affected after the removal of helmets. To prepare the method, you have to add a root booster and spray using salt spray and pin it down. You can make it perfect.

Katniss Slanted Braid

If you want your hair to look good while you ride on your motorbike, a good hairstyle you can use today is the Katniss slanted braid. This hair fits any type of helmet you want to use for your ride. The style is not just good, for helmet use, it is fashionable as well. You would feel comfortable using the hairstyle.

long hair

Ponytail

Perhaps the most popular hairstyle motorbike ride for women is the ponytail. This is an appealing hairstyle when you style it very well. You can combine this hairstyle with French braids on your head sides. This method does only prevent your hair from falling off when you ride but makes you attractive as well. The method is very simple to apply, you need to comb the hair and tie it using an elastic band.

Cut your long hair

Another motorcycle riding hairstyle for women is a haircut. This is the best option for those who engage in other activities such as mount biking and kayaking. The haircut is very comfortable because nothing would disturb your hair while you ride. Moreover, you would not find it difficult to use as it could match any helmet. It would be a perfect fitting when you put on your earrings, this would easily reveal your gender.

I cut mine off short what they call pixie cut short so that I didn’t have to deal with it being all tangled. I realize now I am going to have to start thinking about long hairstyles again since I am growing it out again. (I decided to give it a phoenix dye job once it is long enough). However, cutting it off short is not something everyone wants or can do so we are giving you a few extra ideas to work with.

Pile on Top

Pile on top is another perfect hairstyle idea for women motorcyclists. Using a ponytail band, you can pile your hair to a shoulder length, tie them on top of your head, and use your helmet. This is good for hair because it does not damage and cut your hair. Your hair would remain full anytime you remove your helmet. You only need to apply your fingers through the hair to restore its shape.

Several other methods are available, and you can try any of them. You should always consider such issues as comfort, hair damage, and fashion.

Below is a list of hairstyles and braids that can be helpful to use.

long braid

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on The Long Hair Conundrum: How to How Do I Keep It Contained?.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Bioengineering, Protecting the Head The “Natural” Way.

The human body is a marvel of bioengineering. One of the most precious organs in our body, the brain, is floating in cerebrospinal fluid. This fluid is our head’s natural “padding” against low impacts. When we speed things up, however, the fluid in our head isn’t enough to protect the brain. A higher speed impact will cause the brain to hit the cranial bone, the top part of our head which can, in turn, cause a concussion or even bruising on the brain. This is where helmets come in to help save the day, AMERiders explains how helmet tech can emulate this.

Debatably the most important piece of gear adds an extra layer of protection around the head and helps absorb the energy of an impact. Instead of your head and ultimately the brain suffering from the blow, the helmet takes the brunt of the hit. Most helmets nowadays use foam as a shock-absorbing material. Canadian company Fluid Inside decided to take a different approach and rely instead on the protection our brain already benefits from the fluid.

In fact, the company is responsible for designing Fluid Pods protectors meant to be used inside a variety of helmets, including motorcycle helmets. The liquid inside the pods has been designed to mimic cerebrospinal fluid—the same clear liquid found around our brains. The brand not only creates the pods but has also developed the ideal “mapping” for different types of sports. Impact differ from one sport to the other, which means that different sports require different pod sizes and placement. So for instance, the pods will be placed differently in a motocross helmet compared to, say, a ski helmet.

helmet tech

While standard foam linings have proven their efficiency against linear impacts, companies are starting to study protection against rotational force. With the Fluid Inside products, the pods are able to absorb the energy coming from all directions, meaning that they address both linear impacts and rotational force.

Fluid Inside recently teamed up with Fox Racing to design the V3 helmet, a motocross lid with Fluid Pods technology. We can hope the pods will make their way into other helmets—in case the MIPS purchasing the company isn’t a big enough hint.

While it is a known fact that once you’ve been in a crash and hit your head with a helmet, the lid needs to be replaced because the foam absorbed the energy of the impact but also lost its shape in the process, there is no say about whether the pods are “reusable”. We reached out to Fluid Inside to learn more about its technology and have yet to hear back. Should the liquid-filled pods retain their shape and energy-absorbing properties even after an impact, this means that future motorcycle helmets could be reused instead of being discarded. This could open a door to the creation of helmets that are not only safer but also more resilient.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information Bioengineering Helmet Tech, Protecting the Head The “Natural” Way.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Fluid InsideDigital Trends

Do We Need More Reasons to Ride? It’s Fun and Who Doesn’t Need Fun?

We love our motorcycles but sometimes it’s hard to describe why. Apart from “it’s fun” why do we do it? AMERiders gives you a few more reasons why riding a motorcycle is good for your constitution. It’ll make you feel alive like nothing else, that is for sure. Also, if you think you have heard us talk about riding is good for you we have done at least two posts about it.

more reasons

Cold

Unless you’re a regular Arctic explorer, or you take the T into Boston and then walk more than ten blocks from South Station in late January on the regular (kind of the same thing) you’ll never experience cold; that is, real, true, bone-chilling cold that gets right into your soul, like you will on a motorcycle. Sure, most of our rides are well-planned and on warm days. Sometimes, we’re caught unprepared or the weather takes an unexpected turn and there we are, on the road with that wind piercing us and chilling us right through to our very spine.

Ever see your turn coming up, knowing you’ve got to pull in the bike’s clutch but just not being able to move your hand off the grip, you’re so cold? That’s an adventure. When you still haven’t warmed back up two days later you’ll know you’re a real motorcyclist.

more reasons

Bugs

You’re probably getting plenty of protein in your diet. Most Americans do. But have you considered the environmental impact of meat? That’s where bugs will help you get “greener.” You can ride motorcycles and eat bugs and be only vaguely aware of exactly what kind of bug it is that you’ve just eaten. Usually, you’ll only know if it was soft or crunchy. You’ve certainly never experienced quite that flavor profile before. Sometimes the bugs are helpful enough to get into gaps in your riding gear you didn’t know you had, and sting you a few times just to make sure you don’t forget to secure that zipper next time. Fun! Again we find more reasons to ride a motorcycle.

more reasons

Smells

For sure you’ve ridden past some flowering bushes and caught a whiff of that gloriousness, but you haven’t really lived until you’re in Pennsylvania in October riding past miles and miles (and miles) of farmland that has just had pig shit, I mean biosolids, spread all over it. That’s the real motorcycling experience. Circle of life, you know? You’d swear that poop gets permanently installed deep in your sinuses because even when you’re past it, you can still smell it. Days later, you can still smell it. Years later, the memories haunt you… Again we find more reasons to ride a motorcycle.

Road Kill

Nothing gets you up close and personal with, um, the bare facts of biology like stopping at a red light and putting your foot down into an opossum that someone else has recently inverted. Truly, high school biology class has only lightly prepared you for the stark reality of a spread of day-old intestines all up close and personal. If the red light is a long one, you can also experience the joys of the carrion flies and marvel at the way nothing is wasted in nature. There’s no better way to get right up onto the realities of existence.

People

Let’s face it, motorcycles are a social lubricant. People just want to talk to you when you’re out for a ride, especially if you’re far from home. You can be at a completely deserted gas station and someone will inevitably find you to ask intelligent and poignant questions like “did you ride that thing all the way here?” and “how do you hold that thing up, isn’t it heavy?” and the classic “is that bike yours?” There’s really nothing like getting out into the non-riding public for a reminder about just how smart most of the population of the planet is. I bet you’ve already run into so many people who used to ride, or whose uncle had his leg chopped off by one o’ them things! Again we find more reasons to ride a motorcycle.

Economy

Oh, dear reader, you’re gonna save so much money. First, you’ll need to buy a motorcycle, but if you live in the snow belt, well, no, you can’t replace your car with it. But it will get better gas mileage than your car! But only if you ride a smallish, economic bike, and your car isn’t a hybrid. You’re not done yet though, because you’re going to want to buy a helmet and a riding jacket and some decent boots and probably some riding pants because you’re going to get caught in the cold or the rain some time, and after taking a good, long look at that road kill you’re having a very Zen moment of self-realization about your riding gear. And then that other jacket is on sale and it might be a little better than the one you already have, and that helmet with the new graphics you love just came out. Also, whoever only has one pair of gloves? And you’re going to need luggage, and a better windshield, and maybe some hand guards. You’ve got to get a set of frame sliders, too, because really those will save you money in the long run. That carbon fiber hugger will look really good on your bike too…

Adrenaline

When was the last time you had a proper adrenaline shot? If you like amusement park rides–not the dull ones but the ones where you’re pretty sure you’re going to die you’re going to love motorcycling. It’s like a roller coaster that you get to steer. Except, there’s no track and you’re sharing your ride with oblivious commuters every day! What could be more fun? Every once in a while, and that’s the fun part: you won’t know when; someone will completely ignore the fact of your existence and the laws of physics, all at once. Boy, that hit of adrenaline that shows up after you’ve navigated out of there (and perhaps given that driver some good life advice) sure is a rush, isn’t it? Then the shakes kick in! Woo!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with More Reasons to Ride? It’s Fun and Who Doesn’t Need Fun?

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Can Be Good for You as Well

We already have the scientific proof that riding is good for us. The proof is in the numbers and now more than ever, mental health is an important key to a healthy, balanced lifestyle. The Harley-Davidson-funded study didn’t break down the data into types of riding—of course, as Harley goes, the references to the riding were mainly road-oriented. In a less scientific and let’s say more holistic approach, an author discusses how to find balance in different aspects of your life. Someone took his advice and listed how off-roading checks off all the boxes. Hey, any documentation that says that riding is good for our health, we at AMERiders can get behind. So if this shows Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Can Be Good for You as Well we’ll give it a thumbs up.

Author Samir Becic is a bit of a fitness and health guru. He published a book entitled “ReSYNC Your Life” that details 28-day steps to help the reader find physical and spiritual balance. You may or may not agree/be interested with what the guy has to say; that’s not why we’re here. What’s really cool is how the people at Indochina Travel Blog have taken the principles promoted by Becic and used them to illustrate how off-roading actually meets all these “find your inner balance” criteria. Wind therapy indeed!

Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Good

Just like regular, street riding, off-roading increases the rider’s heart rate, which is comparable to a low strain workout and helps strengthen the heart and develop endurance—obviously not at the rate jogging does, but enough to have a positive impact. Depending on the type of surface you are facing, the ride also helps strengthen muscles—the more rugged the terrain, the harder the workout. Hill climb, jumps, or obstacle crawl? Even better!

Off-Road Motorcycle Cliff Riding

Another benefit that street riders don’t reap as much as off-road riders is a balance. As you make your way through a rough landscape, some spots require you work on your balance to overcome the obstacles, again working those muscles but also engaging the brain. Road riding has already proven to help increase cognitive functions, adrenaline levels, and overall focus. These functions and health benefits are boosted on steroids by the fact that you are riding over a much more challenging surface that requires additional analysis and concentration.

According to Indochina Travel Blog but maybe a little more debatable is the promotion of a good posture. Of course, motocross and adventure motorcycles force the rider into a straighter stance. Plus, posture does play a role in balance but whether it promotes better posture in everyday life remains to be seen. That being said, a few hours of good posture is better than none at all!

households

Finally, riding off-road gets you outside. You know how people complain about being inside all the time nowadays. I mean, with all the technology we enjoy today, there’s very little that requires us to step out—we can even get groceries delivered to our door. Off-roading can’t be done inside so this is the occasion to get a bowl (or a tank) of fresh air and enjoy a moment of communion with nature, especially considering off-roading is usually done in remote places, in the woods, and on countryside dirt roads. So, have you gone for a ride yet? I don’t think you need more excuses to go now.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Off-Road Motorcycle Riding

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information How Off-Road Motorcycle Riding Can Be Good for You.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Indochina Travel Blog

Why Do Motorcycle Riders and Vehicle Drivers Hate Each Other so Much?

We’re all in the same boat anyway! It all started with this video. This clever and funny campaign promotes motorcycle safety and reminds drivers to be aware of motorcyclists on the road. Nothing inherently wrong with that, right? As a rider, I found the message important; as a human being, I found the Ryan Reynolds references hilarious. AMERiders goes into Motorcycle Riders Vehicle Drivers Hate Each Other.

Then, I started reading the comments users had left about the video on YouTube and Facebook and was flabbergasted. An open war of words between drivers dissing the message and blaming riders for their obnoxious behavior and motorcyclists dissing drivers in return for being killing machines. Nothing I haven’t seen before, but it prompted the question: why?

Every road user whines about the other, that’s nothing new. Drivers complain about cyclists, motorcyclists complain about drivers, everyone complains about pedestrians and pedestrians do whatever they like… We’re like a bunch of kids in kindergarten having to share toys.

However, reading drivers’ comments calling out motorcyclists and telling them that their safety is their own goddamn business and that they should be more careful makes me cringe. Dismissing the fact that drivers do represent a potential hazard for motorcyclists is like denying the Earth is spinning, and that’s an issue mainly because it removes the concept of responsibility from the equation. In a car versus motorcycle “battle”, the heavyweight wins.

Of course, I am aware that some riders act stupid, even entitled, and that some of their actions are what actually lead to their demise. There’s absolutely no denying that some riders are complete idiots and not every motorcycle crash involves a driver. Heck, I’ve had driver’s frustrations myself and have even cussed at motorcyclists I thought were making dumb decisions or taking pointless risks. There are some really bad riders out there.

Thing is, there are also really bad drivers. Just like there are really good drivers and really good riders. I can’t help but wonder how is a handful of dumb-dumbs on two wheels any worst than a handful of them on four wheels? Why are motorcyclists less deserving of acknowledgment because of a few loose cannons? Somehow, because motorcycles tend to stand out from the crowd, it seems like people associate them with bad habits and decisions. There’s no clear explanation of why, but the way I see it, it likely all stems from a lack of understanding, and that stems a bit of hate right there.

hate

I strongly believe that basic motorcycle training should be part of every new driver’s training program. Not because people should be forced to ride, but because from my own personal experience, I’ve learned even more about road safety from being on a bike. It might also cut down on the hate bikers have for vehicle drivers as well as vice versa.

Look where you want to go, keep your eyes up and look ahead, be aware of what the driver in front of you is doing, but also the drivers in front of him—this is precious advice that’s not only useful on two wheels but also on four. I don’t remember my driving instructor ever encouraging me to “look where I want to go”—I picked that up from my motorcycle lessons and it’s an incredibly useful habit to have.

I believe that riding has helped me fine-tune certain aspects of my driving skills and that I’ve become a better driver thanks to it. From my personal experience, I find a correlation between motorcycle riding and better awareness on the road. I’m not saying that drivers who have never been on a motorcycle are bad or that everyone who’s been on a bike is an impeccable driver—I just find that people who ride motorcycles consistently have good driving habits.

Putting new drivers in a saddle even just for an hour can help bring a new perspective and a better understanding of the reality of riding. It can also help drivers see beyond their own little bubble, get over the whole “they’re allowed to do things we’re not” discussion and understand that some of these maneuvers help increase safety. 

Ultimately, we’re all stuck in the same boat: we all have to share the road whether we like it or not. If motorcycles circulating between rows of cars are safer, what’s so wrong about it? On the other hand, riders aren’t entitled to anything—riding is a privilege, not a right. So how about we all look out for each other instead of going about this whole thing with an “every man for himself” mentality?

Drivers, we riders aren’t trying to piss you off. We are just trying to get where we need to be and do it alive. Riders, car drivers aren’t out to kill you. They’re just trying to get where they need to be alive.

See any resemblance? There really is no hate there.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on
Why Do Motorcycle Riders and Vehicle Drivers Hate Each Other so Much.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Some Really Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You

There are a million reasons not to ride. Here are some really good reasons motorcycle riding is good for you. Despite the joy that motorcycles offer, only a relatively small fraction of the population rides. While each rider is motivated by their own unique factors, there are a number of strong reasons why everyone should consider getting on two wheels. We have given you reasons before in other articles we here at AMERiders want to reiterate how much fun motorcycle riding can be.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

A Lighter Footprint

Motorcycles have less of an impact on the world compared to cars. Not only do they cause markedly less wear and tear on the road, but they also give off fewer emissions, don’t contribute to congestion, help conserve fuel, free up more parking, and ultimately require less raw materials to be produced.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Fewer Wheels, Less Money

Motorcycles themselves are substantially cheaper than cars in pretty much every regard. The insurance, upkeep, fuel, you name it, and it’s all substantially cheaper in practically every measurable area. Even though your average motorcycle will still be the more economical option in contrast to a car, there exist a number of models that are known for being particularly awesome bang-for-your-buck bikes, like the Suzuki SV650 or Yamaha MT-07.  

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Inject Some Excitement Into Your Routine

Unlike the four-wheeled vehicles, they share the roads with, motorcycles possess the unique ability to cram some excitement and adventure into your daily life/routine. Chances are you have to travel most days, so why not have fun while doing it. Riding can turn commuting from a necessary evil into the highlight of one’s day. 

Good Exercise

Though the motorcycle itself is doing the lion’s share of the work, piloting a motorcycle is a physically active endeavor and not a passive experience like driving a car. Zipping through traffic or cruising down the freeway isn’t very physically demanding, however the same can’t be said for canyon carving, or any other form of aggressive riding really. Flicking a bike from side to side while exhibiting proper body positioning requires a great deal of movement and can, in turn, be a great workout, which is just one of the Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You.

Beat Traffic

While not applicable everywhere, lane splitting and filtering are complete and total game-changers in major metropolitan areas, especially ones riddled with congestion. Motorcycles essentially give you a legal pass in many places to cut the proverbial traffic line and zip along to your destination, while passing countless drivers caught up in the daily gridlock. Once you try it, you’ll never go back.

The Community Rocks

While this one is a bit of a cliché, it’s still very true. The motorcycling community is packed with some really incredible people. Few other commonalities bring strangers from different walks of life together quite like riding. Each year there are countless stories about bikers and riders groups carrying out selfless acts to help those in need. Despite the general public’s rather stereotypical misperception, bikers really are some of the nicest people…and you don’t just meet them on Hondas.

Disconnecting From A Hyper-Connected World

In today’s day and age, far too many of us are permanently tethered to our smartphones. One study from 2017 found that the average person checks their phone around 80 times per day. While this is waning due to the increased presence of Bluetooth connectivity and comms systems and what not on motorcycles, riding still presents one of the rare opportunities to completely unplug from social media, mobile devices, or whatever other distractions or stresses that may be weighing on you. Riding allows you to Zen out, let go, and focus purely on the task at hand.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Learn More Mechanics

If you own a motorcycle for long enough, you’d have to make a conscious effort to actively avoid doing any maintenance or upkeep whatsoever in order to not learn a thing or two about how an engine operates. Even if it’s simply grasping the basics of an internal combustion engine cycle, most riders tend to be better versed in mechanics than your average car owner. The relationship between rider and bike is more intense than the ones between cars and their owners, so bikers tend to be more motivated to learn what makes the bike tick, and how to keep it ticking.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Supercar Experience At Kia Pricing

If you want to go out and purchase a car capable of doing anything close to 200mph, you should realistically expect to spend in the high five-figures, if not well into the six-figures. Experiencing the performance of a sub-3-second 0-60mph time is typically a sensation reserved for the wealthy, that is unless you’re on a motorcycle. See, for a couple grand (or less), anyone can hop on their local Craigslist, purchase an older used sportbike, and then be capable of besting more than 90 percent of the cars on the road. This is another great reason to opt for travel on two wheels.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

The Gear

Motorcycle gear has come a long way from goggles and heavy leather gauntlets and waxed cotton riding coats. Whether its heads up displays and action cameras that enable you to record your rides in HD or the fully-armored and Kevlar lined jeans and flannels that look all GQ when off the bike, there’s just so much great gear out there today. Advancements in materials and construction techniques give us riders an enormous selection of gear ranging in type, style, price, etc. Whatever your style or taste, there’s probably a bunch of fantastic gear out there that’s right up your alley.

Reasons Motorcycle Riding

Best Time To Start

For years small-displacement entry-level options were few and far between. Novice riders had few choices, and the bikes that did exist weren’t particularly attractive or exciting. Today, though, you can find pretty much any style of scoot you want in a learner bike. “You can go out right now and buy a gorgeous stock entry-level bike” isn’t a statement that would have been true even half-a-decade-ago, adding to our list of Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on Some Really Good Reasons Motorcycle Riding Is Good for You.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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What No One Tells You About Your First Motorcycle Ride

We often forget to mention a few things you should expect when you start riding. Aspiring motorcyclists of the internet age frequently search for articles and forum posts to tell them what to expect once they hit the road on two wheels for the first times. There’s a lot of good advice and some not-so-good you can find here are a few points that AMERiders found about some things that no one tells you about your First Motorcycle ride.

1. Respect For The Machine Is Not Enough

The most common advice new riders get is to respect the machine. Almost any motorcycle, even a tame beginner bike, can outrun almost any car on the road. The thing is, any new rider with a sense of self-preservation is fully aware of this, as well as the fact that they don’t have the experience to properly handle the bike yet. Most riders aren’t popping wheelies and burnouts on their first motorcycle ride because they already respect the machine.

2. You Will Hit Random Buttons

Even before taking the MSF course, I bought The Complete Idiot’s Guide To Motorcycles, with a keen interest in learning exactly where all of the controls were. With so many controls placed by your thumbs, you’re bound to hit the horn when you intend to signal at times. Some say this is a newbie thing, but since different bikes put their controls in different places, I’ve personally never completely outgrown this.

First Motorcycle Ride

3. The Throttle Is Very Touchy

A small engine with a small flywheel is much more responsive to throttle inputs than a larger car engine. That, plus inexperience with a hand throttle, means that you’ll be revving the engine too much at times. This just takes practice.

4. Downshifting Is More Jerky Than You Expect

For similar reasons, shifting to a lower gear isn’t very smooth, even if you do it slowly. There are techniques such as rev matchingthat will help with this, but as a newbie, you haven’t learned those yet, and your attention should be on mastering basic bike control first.

First Motorcycle Ride

5. The Bike Is Much More Stable At Higher Speeds

The MSF course has you poking around a parking lot, but once you hit higher speeds on the street, it’s amazing just how much more stable the bike is. It actively wants to stay upright instead of falling over, and the faster you go, the more pronounced this effect is. It’s simple physics, centrifugal force and such, but you have to experience it to really understand it.

6. Countersteering Doesn’t Work At Slow Speeds

One of the most important skills the MSF course teaches you is countersteering, which is necessary to make a bike turn at higher speeds. Ironically, this technique doesn’t work at slower parking lot speeds. You simply don’t have the momentum for countersteering to have the desired effect. Fortunately, slow speeds are the only time that simply turning the handlebars works.

First Motorcycle Ride

7. Feeling When To Countersteer Comes Quickly

As you accelerate, there comes a point when you should stop turning and start countersteering. This transition speed varies, but with experience, you will simply know when to change your cornering technique from one to the other.

8. Learning The Stopping Process

In a car, you simply press the brake (and push in the clutch if you’re in the small minority that drives a manual transmission), then you stop. On a bike, you have two brake controls, a clutch, and a shifter to manage, all while making sure to move a foot off the controls and onto the ground before tipping over.

The MSF teaches you to use both front and rear brakes, pull in the clutch, and downshift to first gear while you’re still moving. Then use your left foot to stabilize yourself, riding the rear brake with your right foot until you’re completely stopped, at which point you can put it down if you want. That’s a lot to manage all at once, especially for a new rider. You will mess this up. I still don’t always get this right. It’s OK.

First Motorcycle Ride

9. Using The Whole Lane

Suddenly, on a motorcycle, you have all this space to play with inside your lane. You can hug the left, the right, or the middle of it. Pothole cratered roads magically smooth out as you can swerve around the bumps without leaving your assigned lane. That’s so cool.

10. Using The Appropriate Gear

In this case, I mean what gear the transmission is in, not what riding gear you’re wearing. My Honda PC800 has gearing and an engine RPM range like a car, but it’s the exception to the rule for motorcycles. You may find yourself lugging away from a stop in a gear that would be appropriate in a car but is way too low on a motorcycle. Some bikes can hit 90 mph in second gear with no problem. Learning when to be in what gear just takes practice.

11. Getting Used To Higher Engine RPMs

On a bike with a 14,000 RPM redline, cruising down the highway at 6,000 RPM is perfectly OK. You wouldn’t want to try that in most cars, especially since this is a past redline for some engines. A smaller motorcycle engine can handle higher revs with ease. The inline-4 engine that many sportbikes use runs quite smoothly, and you won’t even notice when you’re routinely running it at revs that would make many car engines explode.

I hope that these tips have helped you to understand just what your in for with your First Motorcycle ride.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

First Motorcycle Ride

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information about What No One Tells You About Your First Motorcycle Ride.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Speeding Ticket: In What States Are You Most Likely to Get One In?

We always try to find patterns when it comes to being pulled over. Is it entirely random or are there factors that weigh in the balance? The type of bike you’re riding on, its color maybe? Or maybe it has something to do with riding alone versus in a group? You’d be hard pressed to find a functioning algorithm to answer that question. A New York-based Honda dealer decided to have a look at the most recent data when it comes to getting a speeding ticket. While you might or might not get away with busting the speed limit, it seems like some states are likely to go harder on you than others. AMERiders explains what the dealer found.

Yonkers Honda attempted to have a look at the places across the country you are more and less likely to get pulled over for a speeding ticket. The team managed to get data from 48 of the 50 states, commenting that Louisiana and Arkansas proved to be too elusive). They then compiled the total number of tickets handed out in each state from the most recent year on record, as well as the number of tickets issued per 10,000 citizens—which is the data we’re interested in.

Speeding Ticket

Obviously, California stood out with the highest volume of tickets issued with over 1M handed in 2017, however, prorated to the population, it turns out that at 330 tickets per 10k people. It didn’t even make the top 10 list of states that issue the most tickets per capita.

That honor surprisingly goes to Wyoming. With an average of 903 tickets per 10k people issued in 2017, for a total of over 42,000 for the year, the state ranks first in the number of ticket per capita. A quick math tells us that roughly one out of eleven citizens have received a fine for speeding. Wyoming is followed closely by South Carolina and Oregon.

Speeding Ticket

The big winner of speeding ticket pool is Michigan with only 70 tickets issued per 10,000 citizens while the state that has issued the least tickets in total was North Dakota in 2016 with 4,512 statements for the entire year. Looks like people on the northern West Coast and southern East Coast better keep their speed in check!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

speeding ticket

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Speeding Ticket and What States Are You Most Likely to Get One In.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Yonkers Honda

May 2019 Is Motorcycle Awareness Month so Look Twice Save a Life.

There are many things to be aware and we have a month for all of them some of them are just a day or a week. But each May we have Motorcycle Awareness Month. AMERiders supports Motorcycle Awareness Month so make sure to look twice and save a life.

In the month of May, in particular, look out for motorcycle safety events in your area. Some of these are rides that promote visibility, others are geared toward skills enhancement. All of them will help make you a better rider. For example, two years ago, I decided to upgrade my moto license, which meant that I had to review, practice, and demonstrate all the rules of the road. What were those reminders, you ask? So glad you did.

Motorcycle awareness
Keep your eyes peeled for other riders

After a day with an experienced instructor I was reminded of the importance of the following:

  1. Leave lots of space between you and the driver in front both while you’re riding and while you’re waiting. This gives you more space to evade the drive that you suddenly notice is headed right where you are as though you aren’t there. You saw this because you always….
  2. Watch your side mirrors—even when you’re stopped. Someone hit our car from behind just yesterday. He thought the advance green was for him, ‘cept we were all still waiting for our light. Well, not all of us, clearly; great reminder to watch for distracted drivers.
  3. Wear all your gear, all the time, even when it’s damn hot. Nothing is as warm as third degree burns on your whole body, and nothing ruins a riding season like broken limbs.

Fact is, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA), as the number of motorcycle riders increases (yay!) so do the instances of fatal motorcycle crashed (boo!), 37 percent of which involve alcohol! Drink and ride? Duh. Aside from giving you an over-inflated sense of your abilities, alcohol impairs both your balance and response time. Drugs are also a bad idea on a bike, but the statistics are difficult to gather, so in the meantime, err on the side of “no.” After all, isn’t riding the only high you need?

Choosing to participate in a sport that has elevated levels of risk is not what we need to avoid, we need to avoid our own mistakes and drivers who make them. So, during this, the month when we’re paying a little more attention, do that. Don’t complain about what people do, watch out for them while you do everything right.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on May 2019 Is Motorcycle Awareness Month so Look Twice Save a Life.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Sources: NHTSAMMIC