Category Archives: Middle Of The Road

As Promised Harley-Davidson’s “The No Show” Bike Show Winners

As Promised AMERiders brings you Harley-Davidson’s “The No Show” Bike Show Winners. “The No Show” Bike Show hosted by Harley-Davidson wrapped up on the 21st of June, it was the first-ever week-long motorcycle show hosted virtually on the brand’s Instagram page. It featured builders invited by H-D and the postponed Mama Tried, Congregation Vintage Bike & Car, and Born-Free Motorcycles shows. More than 60 contestants from around the world participated, posting images and videos of their custom builds that varied radically in style– with three standout builds grabbing titles. Let’s see what the titles were and who won them.

The List of Awards

  • When the dust settled and the votes were cast, three winners rose to the top in three distinct categories:
  • Media Choice Award: chosen and presented by a journalist panel from industry-leading motorcycle publications.
  • H-D Styling & Design Award: chosen and presented by Brad Richards, vice president of styling & design at Harley-Davidson and long-time garage builder.
  • Harley-Davidson Museum Award: chosen by museum staff and presented by Bill Davidson, vice president of the Harley-Davidson Museum and great-grandson of Harley-Davidson’s co-founder William A. Davidson.

Media Choice Award Winner

The winner of the “Media Choice Award” is Ben Zales of Burbank, California for his custom 1963 Harley-Davidson Panhead motorcycle. Journalists approved of the bike’s unique take and its ‘60’s era influence. Zales fabricated the bike in his home garage, building the tank, pipes, seat and controls from scratch. The interesting tear-dropped oil tank is designed to match the fuel tank, kicker-pedal and seat, visually tying it all together. Zales is no stranger to the custom bike scene, as he is a Born-Free 10 and 11 invited builder, as well as carrying the esteemed title of being a Mooneyes Hot Rod Custom Show 2019 invited guest. Check out a full walkaround of Zales’ build on Instagram.

H-D Styling & Design Award Winner

Picking up the “H-D Styling & Design Award” is Michael Lange of Waukesha, Wisconsin for his customized 1921 Harley-Davidson Banjo Two-cam Board Track Racer. Lange cleverly converted a single-cam Harley-Davidson into a twin-cam and also fabricated the cam chest, cover, and gear rack – not to mention the camshafts, gears, and oil pump. Notable features include H-D factory racing cylinder casting from a board track racer, and the gas tank is hand fabricated. Brad Richards of Harley-Davidson’s styling and design team said, “The custom build stood out for its beauty, but also as a pure racing machine with a re-engineered motor that keeps the bike performing.” Lange has been an invited builder to the Mama Tried Motorcycle Show since its inception. Click here to see a walkaround of the build. 

Harley-Davidson Museum Award

Taking home the “Harley-Davidson Museum Award” is Christian Newman of Buffalo, New York for his svelte, all stainless-steel custom 1940 Harley-Davidson Knucklehead motorcycle that he designed and fabricated. H-D Museum staff chose Newman due to the thoughtfulness of attention to detail that his build showcases. Particularly interesting elements of the build include narrowing the transmission 2 inches, running the oil through the frame, feed, return and vent. The bike also boasts a sprocket and brake rotor mounted on the exterior of the frame, girder fork, open rockers, and vintage glass lenses in handmade housings. The handlebar, grips, and controls are handmade as well. Newman is a Born-Free 12 invited builder and to check out his latest creation, click this link.

To check out all the entries into “The No Show”, visit Harley-Davidson’s official Instagram page and scroll through the dizzying array of bikes on display, accompanied by a personal video of each builder, describing their custom motorcycles in detail. Limited edition merchandise from “The No Show” is available for purchase, with all proceeds benefitting the invited builders directly. 

Those who missed the show can visit Harley-Davidson’s Instagram page to scroll through the array of bikes and tap into their favorites where they’ll see a personal video of each builder walking them through his or her masterpiece. A virtual “stage” to listen to acoustic sets is also still available as well as a “merch booth” featuring ultra-limited-edition The No Show t-shirts that can be purchased while supplies last, with 100 percent of T-shirt sales going directly to benefit invited builders.

AMERiders would like to Congratulate the winners!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

winners

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on “The No Show” Bike Show Winners.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

AMERiders Brings You the Worst Harley Bikes & the Ones Worth the $$$

With as long a history as the company has, there’s plenty of room to offer up great picks for those interested in owning their very own Harley. Of course, not every choice is perfect, just like not every Harley is perfect. There have been numerous ups and downs in the company’s history, but so far Harley-Davidson has weathered the storm admirably. So join us here ar AMERiders as we take a look at some of the best choices for your next Harley purchase that are worth the money, and some to avoid altogether.

The Harley name is as synonymous with motorcycles as Photoshop is to image editing. Founded in 1903, the bike maker has forged ahead with all types of cruising and performance machines, to the delight of its owners and fans. From hilltops to the race track, Harley’s assortment of bikes has won them praise from all over the world. Their bikes have been featured in everything from toys to the big screen. We have to admit, whoever does their marketing is doing an excellent job.

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The Epitome Of Perfection – 1915-11F

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The 11F represented the emerging technological advancements that could be incorporated into a motorcycle back in 1915. Offering a three-speed transmission, an electrical lighting system and most importantly, an 11 HP powerplant, this Harley the first bike to guarantee its power rating in writing, according to How Stuff Works. Bike Curios says the 11F was so popular that 10,000 of them were sold. With features like a Prest-O-Lite headlight and a detachable tail light that could be used as a flashlight, it’s not hard to see why the company became so successful. Some things like the braking system and front suspension still needed to catch up in the advancement game though.

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Come Glide With Me – 2009 Harley-Davidson Electra Glide

The 2009 edition of this bike addressed many issues and concerns about the previous generations of Electra Glide, adding a larger fuel tank and rerouting the exhaust system that was heating up so many of the earlier model riders’ thighs, according to Motorcycle. The addition of electronic cruise control and improved handling were also cited as a big plus, says Total Motorcycle. Harley Davidson also commented on the abilities of the upgraded chassis which brought much better control and handling, as well as riding comfort to the masses.

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It’s In The Genes – 2011 Harley-Davidson Heritage Classic

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Looking every bit like it rode straight out of a time portal from the 1950s, the Heritage Classic was just as technologically modern as any of its siblings. And that’s what the owners of the Softail model love about it. Everything from the running boards to the detachable windshield screams “nostalgia”. This bike was meant for cruising, for taking on the long haul Rider Magazine considers the Heritage Classic to be a genuine touring motorcycle and does what the manufacturer says it will do. We would hope so, as the 2011 Heritage represented the 25th anniversary of the original.

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A Cult All Its Own – 1977 Harley-Davidson XLCR 1000

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If looks count, then this bike would probably be considered one of the first supermodels on the scene. The XLCR 1000 was classified as a Cafe Racer, something to be admired for its speed and handling far more than actual comfort. For that purpose, the XLCR ( pronounced Excelsior) fit the bill quite nicely. Just about everything about the bike was black, or accented with black, which made for a cool look. The XLCR quickly built up a cult following, its fans spurred on by promises of a 120 MPH top speed and great handling, as long as you weren’t going too far, says Motorcycle Classics. The bike was far from perfect, but at the time it was exactly what Harley needed to offer its riders and worth the money.

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Got Hill, Will Climb – 1932 DAH Hillclimber

This is the bike that probably restored Harley-Davidson’s confidence, not only from the company’s perspective but also from its loyal fanbase. Hemmings has an excellent article detailing how Harley couldn’t really compete against the likes of Excelsior and Indian during hill-climbing competitions. Harley’s competitors used 45 cubic-inch machines, while Harley’s best was only an underpowered 30 cubic-inch engine. Enter the DAH Hillclimber, a modernized 45 cubic-inch wonder, which quickly kicked its competition to the curb. Only 25 of these bikes were ever made, their purpose was to dominate the hill-climbing circuit. These are actually the rarest Harley-Davidson bikes ever, so if you find one, keep it, it is worth the money.

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Resistance Is Futile – 2007 VRXSE Destroyer

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It’s amazing what a bit of horsepower and tuning can do for any vehicle, but it’s mind-boggling when it happens to a Harley. The VRXSE Destroyer is a fitting example when Harley-Davidson decided to make a purpose-built bike for racing. This 165 HP beast is everything its name says, louder, prouder, and more powerful than you’d ever think. A reporter for Cycle World was able to do a 9.9-second quarter-mile run going at 134 MPH on his first-ever run. That got a lot of people’s attention. The bike is truly beautiful and speaks volumes about Harley and its commitment to please riders.

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Easy Like Sunday Morning – 1999 FXDX Dyna Super Glide

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The 1999 FXDX Dyna Super Glide has achieved icon status not because it’s the greatest bike that Harley-Davidson has ever put out, but because it’s a Harley that had everything its riders wanted from a big bike. It certainly wasn’t the fastest, but for a 650-lb bike, it had adequate power and the body was tweaked and tuned enough to ensure riders wouldn’t be disappointed. Motorcyclist Online mentions that owners should watch out for the 5-speed gearbox, as it can be clunky at times. All said this icon has aged quite well, and it is still well worth its money.

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A Real Hog To Get Down In The Mud With – 1990 FLSTF Fat Boy

Before you ask, the term “Fat Boy” refers to the massive appearance this bike has. The 4-stroke, 45-degree V-twin engine pumps out just over 48 HP, more than enough to take 2 people down the roads in leisurely comfort. MCycle mentions that the bike has a top speed of 91.96 MPH and that it weighs 657 lbs. Fat Boy is perhaps the most car-like of any Bike that we can think of. The suspension is so good you could probably ride directly over an open manhole and never notice. Sump Magazine sums it up best when they say that “One minute there was the world without Fat Boy, and then there was the world after.”

7

Put The Top Down – 2012 CVO Softail Convertible

The CVO is a well-loved Softail because it can be configured quickly to suit the rider without them having to carry a toolbox around to do it. The limited-edition bike came with detachable saddlebags, front fairing, passenger pillion, and windshield, says Ultimate Motorcycling. This was a perfect setup for those needing to change from a two-seat setup back to a one-seater for instance, hence the name “Convertible”. ThunderPress mentions that only 1500 of the CVO Softail were made for the model year, which we’re sure makes collectors happy. Other features that were considered unique that the Convertible was the only bike at the time of any Harley model to offer keyless ignition and lockable, soft-sided panniers. Great bike and well worth the money.

6

If Looks Could Kill – 2006 VRSCSE2

This limited-edition V-Rod really packs a punch. It has a top speed of 127 MPH pumping furiously from its liquid-cooled engine, which shockingly was built in collaboration with Porsche! The VRSCSE2 wasn’t meant to be a race bike, but more of a Harley that happened to have a lot of power when needed. Rider Magazine mentions in an article that the bike’s engineers did admit they purposely chose style over performance when creating the bike. This is why this model is considered by many to be a performance cruiser more than anything else. We certainly have no problem with a bike that can fill this niche, and its owners agree its worth the money.

5

Too Heavy For Its Own Good – 1981 HD Sportster

The ‘81 Sportster is a polarizing beast. Though it was generally liked, it was also universally panned because of various problems related to its electrical system and other components. It’s top-heavy stance and elongated forks didn’t exactly help to win over fans either. Thanks to its rather poor suspension, the handling was considered by many reviewers to be atrocious. Live About also mentions that the Sportster also suffered from low-speed maneuverability issues because of the forks. This is one Harley to avoid and not worth the money.

4

Cut The Cord Now – No, Wait – Harley Davidson Livewire

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Yes, it’s a new bike, but the Livewire has had numerous problems in its short on again off again life. The electric bike has experienced problems with its charging system, which in turn led Harley to stop production of the bike in October of 2019. The bike only started shipping in September of 2019. Harley-Davidson has started production again, saying the bike is safe, coming out with a rather vaguely-worded statement according to The Verge. Being that there are going to be problems with the new electrical vehicle of any type, we wish Harley had been more forthcoming in its explanation about Livewire. It is iffy on whether or not it is worth the money at this time.

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Don’t Choke Up – 2014 Electra Glide

The Electra Glide brand is famous, but the 2014 model put a damper on things and left many owners with a bad taste in their mouths. Severe problems with the Electra Glide’s clutch led to a massive recall of more than 45,000 vehicles in 2015. According to Motorcyclist, the problem with the clutch not disengaging properly could have led to increased risks of a crash. In total there’s been around 5 recalls for this particular model, and lots of complaints filed with the NHTSA, mostly concerning brake and engine problems. Take extra care if you are considering buying the 2014 model to make sure all recalls have been applied to it.

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If It Feels Cheap, It Probably Is – HD Street 500 And 750

The Street 500 and 700 models seem to carry a dark cloud around them. Both models have had their share of problems, including a major worldwide recall concerning the unit’s brake systems in August 2018. The recall affected models from 2016-2019. Apparently Street owners were experiencing issues with dragging brakes and corrosion developing around those areas. Ride Apart says that the brake problem resulted in several crashes and injuries. Though the problems have been remedied, we’d still be careful with these bikes and check them thoroughly before considering a purchase. It is not worth the money.

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Keep Your Mechanic Handy – 2005 Softail Deluxe

While everyone experiences engine problems eventually, most would agree that they don’t want this to happen while riding their Harley. The 2005 Softail Deluxe’s twin-cam engine problem, is something you’ll want to avoid, according to many reviewers on the web. UltraCool says the problem with the Softail Deluxe has to do with some of its perceived cheaper components. Specifically, the plastic shoes on the cam chain wear down due to rubbing, When they wear out, you have metal on metal contact. This could lead to a very costly repair job if it’s not noticed in time. We recommend avoiding this model altogether as it isn’t worth the money.

Nowwww….

I am not saying you can’t have any of the 5 bikes we mentioned you should avoid, it is just best that you shouldn’t buy them. Some people are going to have a hissy and get upset by this article but people always do when articles like this are written. It can’t be helped.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Worst Harley Bikes & the Ones Worth the $$$.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Harley’s “The No Show” Bike Show & a Bike With a Really Tiny Gas Tank

The global health crisis has pretty much put an end to all auto and motorcycle shows this year, and we are already getting word of some other events scheduled for 2021, like the Oscars, being pushed to a later date than originally planned. But if you’re missing your favorite motorcycle show this season because of COVID-19, Harley-Davidson’s got your back. They are hosting the “The No Show” bike show, which started on Tuesday 16th of June and ends on Sunday the 21st. The online bike show is on Harley’s Instagram account. One such bike show was a bike with a tiny gas tank. AMERiders has the stories.

Harley’s “The No Show” Bike Show helps many bike builders
no show

For custom motorcycle shops hoping to show their creations in public for the first time this year, that’s nothing short of a tragedy. But if there’s something we learned during our time locked up in our homes is that the Internet can provide at times a solid way out.

In an attempt to let all those who have worked possibly for months on their builds get the exposure they need, Harley-Davidson announced on Monday (June 15) it is holding a special event on Instagram. Aptly called The No Show, it will be the place where 60 builders from 10 countries would be showing their machines.

The show lasts for one week, being scheduled to end on June 21, but already there are a number of bikes featured there. Most of what you are about to see over the coming days should have been presented at postponed events like Mama Tried, Congregation Vintage Bike & Car, and Born-Free.

Each of the Instagram posts will be accompanied by a video describing each build, so that everyone watching could get as close to seeing the bikes in the flesh as possible.

No Show
H-D Bark at the Moon by Rob Hultz

“The No Show is a platform that provides everyone from enthusiasts to new riders a place to converge and celebrate the diverse artistry that comes with custom builds,” said in a statement Patrick Holly, brand director at Harley-Davidson Motor Company.

“As a way to show our gratitude to the builders that helped make The No Show possible, 100 percent of show t-shirt sales will go directly to each invited builder.”

The Milwaukee company announced at the beginning of the week the launch of “The No Show”, is dedicated to 60 builders that haven’t gotten a chance to show their builds in the flesh. The event runs for a week, so prepare for some busy times ahead for custom Harley lovers.

On June 21, three builders will be awarded for their efforts. I’ll try to put something up about those next week.

How far would this tank take you?

One of the bikes shown by Harley on Day 2 of the event is this 1963 Panhead, customized by a guy named Ben Zales. The build has been completed last year and was supposed to show at one of the many canceled shows in 2020.

Now we get to experience it online through the video attached below, narrated by the builder himself. And what we learn is that this is mostly a show bike, because the tiny little fuel tank – created by Zales – is so small it could “probably get you to the gas station, and that’s about it.”

Aside from the tank, the builder also designed the pipes, seat, controls, and the new front end, making the Panhead look not extreme, but extremely well proportioned and balanced. It is a nice piece of metal to look at from a chromatic perspective, as the blue on the frame and tank perfectly matches the chrome on the engine, fork, and wheel rims.

Next week, when “The No Show” will be over, and Harley will select three of the best designs for official recognition. Make sure to tune in to find out which 3 get the recognition they deserve.

Awards

“The No Show” closes on Sunday, June 21, with an awards presentation. The MoCo announced three awards, starting with a Media Choice Award, chosen and presented by moto-journalists. There’s also an H-D Styling & Design Award, presented and chosen by Harley’s VP of Styling and Design Brad Richards. The Harley-Davidson Museum staff is getting involved too, choosing the aptly-named Harley-Davidson Museum Award. Museum VP Bill Davidson, who happens to be the great-grandson of Harley’s co-founder William A. Davidson, is presenting this one. Stay tuned we will give you the updates on who won what.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Harley’s “The No Show” Bike Show & a Bike With a Really Tiny Gas Tank.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Sturgis 2020 Update It Is Proceeding With COVID Restrictions

So far, 2020 has been the year that never was, and most of us would love to have a redo of this year. Events of every kind have been canceled or postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. South Dakota has gotten off pretty easy with the coronavirus due to its relatively sparse population, and the current plan is full speed ahead for the 80th annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. AMERiders has an update on our Sturgis post last month for you were we were waiting on the council’s vote to find out if the rally would even move forward, and it will with some COVID restrictions.

“We’re 100 percent on planning the rally,” said Sturgis Mayor Mark Carstensen at a news briefing at Sturgis City Hall back on March 25. He went on to say that with the rally five months away at that time, he hoped that the virus will have run much of its course by then.  

As hard-hit areas of the US begin to see improvement while others continue to get worse or are seeing a second wave, Sturgis organizers remain unconcerned.

However, According to KOTA-TV, Sturgis City Council approved the event on Monday 6/16/2020 with an 8 to 1 vote, bringing a final answer to weeks of uncertainty about the festival.

There have been some COVID Restrictions set in place for the rally, however.

The COVID-19 pandemic version of the Rally will have no opening ceremonies, no B-1 fly-over of Main Street, no bands or contests at Harley-Davidson Rally Point, and no photo towers.

Under their “proceed and prepare plan,” the city will issue vendor permits and require them to wear PPE to keep visitors safe. The city also plans to buy PPE or personal protective equipment and distribute them to local businesses if needed. The city itself already has PPE for its employees, so this would be additional materials for others in Sturgis during the rally.

Parking is allowed on Main street, but plaza seating and open container drinks will not be allowed, according to KOTA. But it will have hand-sanitizing stations on Main Street as well as a nightly disinfecting of the downtown sidewalks. The issue of the cost of the hand sanitizer had come up during council discussion Monday night.

Full Throttle Saloon and Pappy Hoel Campground owner Michael Ballard “Our distillery is making hand sanitizer, and I’ll donate the $10,000 bill for the sanitizer,” he said.

In addition, mass testing is being considered but has not been approved. Each test could cost up to $150 per person, said KOTA.

According to the Black Hills Pioneer, the changes are meant to reduce the number of people gathering at once and possibly spreading coronavirus.

The annual rally is a huge tourist attraction for the area. According to city statistics, the highest attendance was just under 740,000 in 2015.

As the country starts to reopen, despite the threat of an even more severe second wave of infection, it’s a tough call whether to head to Sturgis or not. While South Dakota has not been a hot spot, people traveling to the area from all over could inadvertently bring it with them, spread it, and bring it back home with them. You can expect the downtown area to be pretty crowded regardless. If you party it up at the Buffalo Chip, where big-name concerts like Willie Nelson, ZZ Top, Shinedown, Puddle of Mudd, and the very last Lynyrd Skynyrd show will take place, I can assure you that social distancing will be impossible in the crowds.

Here is the Mayors Rally update posted on Facebook

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Sturgis 2020 Update It Is Proceeding With COVID Restrictions.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

A Self-Balancing Technology on a Bike From Harley? It’s Not Surprising.

I’m going to make an obvious statement here, but most Harleys are heavy bikes. I know, shocking. With 800 pounds of bike to maneuver (depending on the model), there’s always a bit of a heightened risk of the rig going down—something I’ve not personally experienced yet “knock on wood” However, I have helped pick them up and will say those suckers are heavy. Just try picking up a 900-pound CVO by yourself if you don’t do it right you can pull a muscle. Because the bikes are so heavy, not only is trying to keep the bike from tipping almost impossible, picking it up is equally difficult. AMERiders thinks that self-balancing technology would be just the thing to help us clutzes out.   

A recent patent we dug up suggests that The Harley could soon be about to take care of that minor weight issue thanks to a gyroscopic system that would help balance the bike.  

The patent published in May 2020 describes “a gyroscopic rider assist device operable to output a corrective moment on the vehicle in response to an input from an actuator.” Simply put, the company is seemingly developing a form of self-balancing technology.   

This iteration of the technology uses a gimbal-mounted flywheel equipped with speed and tip sensors—a good ol’ mechanical gyroscope, as opposed to electric sensors like the ones found in Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). According to the patent, the system is designed to detect low-speed tips and uses the computer-managed gyroscope to counteract an inclination that goes beyond the programmed threshold and help keep the motorcycle upright. The contraption would be placed in the top case, at the back of the bike.  

self-balancing

The document explains that the rotational speed of the flywheel could be as high as 10,000 to 20,000 rpm, stating that some constructions could even allow speeds of up to 40,000 rpm. Though the flywheel is expected to spin at all times “to be ready”, the self-balancing system itself would only be active at low speeds: “A clutch is provided between the actuator and the gyroscopic rider assist device to selectively deactivate the gyroscopic rider assist device upon transition from a first condition of the vehicle to a second condition of the vehicle.” The gyroscope will not intervene at cruising speeds while the rider is tackling bends and leaning in curves.  

While most able-bodied riders can manage the weight of these bikes fairly easily, a drop can have a more significant impact on Harley’s aging customer base. The same can be said about newer, less-experienced riders who might find the weight and size of the bike overwhelming and be deterred from buying into Harley for that reason. A self-balancing system could be a solution to encourage more riders to get on big, bulky Harleys in the future.   

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Self-Balancing Technology From Harley.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

The Harley-Davidson Road King Is the King of Bikes to Own

The Harley-Davidson Road King Is the King of Bikes to Own. Sean, from Bikes and Beards/SRK Cycles, will tell you that, and he’s got some reasons to back up that bold assertion. AMERiders relays what he has to say.

First up, Sean points out the bike’s buttons and updated panniers. Uh, not really convincing us here, Sean (although the saddlebag lids were indeed a big improvement over the previous design). Once he gets the bike out on the road, though, he’s got some better points.  

The Road King stands out in Harley-Davidson’s touring lineup because it’s really a very simple motorcycle. It’s got a big V-twin engine (the high-output Twin Cam 103, in this bike’s case), a quick-detach windshield, a set of crash bars, hard saddlebags, a set of running lights augmenting the headlight—and not much else. In factory configuration, there’s no massive stereo, no GPS system, and none of the other cruft Harley hangs off the heavy tourers like the Electra Glide and the Ultra. Compared to the rest of H-D’s touring machinery, this is a stripped-down bike. 

It’s got everything you really need for long miles on the open road, though, including a massive six-gallon fuel tank. Without all the extra add-ons, the Road King is far lighter than many other V-twin tourers, including those from other companies. It also has a reputation for decent handling—partly because of the weight, partly because it’s designed with good cornering clearance. 

In the long term, the Road King is easy to work on (there’s no fairing hiding the engine), and its classic look means it won’t be loaded down with out-of-date gadgets in a few years’ time.  

“There’s nothing on this bike that really dates it,” Sean says. “I feel … in 50 years, the Road King is going to be more of a timeless collector piece than an Ultra Classic, especially if you modify your bike, the whole thing is stereos and speakers.” 

All the good points! Ultimately, it comes down to this: What do you want to do with your bike? Like Sean points out, the Road King does some things well now, and decades from now, its classic styling should still be a plus with collectors. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with Harley-Davidson Road King Is the King of Bikes to Own.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Thunderbike’s Country Cruiser a Harley Street Bob With 2 Back Wheels

The European custom motorcycle industry is not even close in terms of size and reach as that in the U.S. but that doesn’t mean there aren’t shops on the continent that strive to keep this segment populated with constant new builds. German Thunderbike is one such shop, and this here machine is its latest customized Harley. AMERiders has the story on their Country Cruiser.

Based on the bike maker’s Street Bob, the bike has been built to highlight what Thunderbike has to offer in terms of custom parts for Harley motorcycles. But it is also described as the perfect tool for riders to “clear your head and leave the stress of everyday life behind.”

The first things that stand out when it comes to this Street Bob are the wheels. The garage decided to fit the motorcycle with two rear wheels for symmetry and more balanced proportions: the front one is a 3-inch wide wheel that usually goes at the rear, while the rear one has been replaced with a 5.5-inch wide one. Both are wrapped in Dunlop rubber,

A long list of other custom parts made it onto the all-black build, most of them of Thunderbike-design. They range from the front and rear fenders to turn signals and exhaust – this last piece of hardware is from Dr.Jekill & Mr.Hyde.

“To give the Country Cruiser more visual highlights we have installed our covers “Drilled” on the primary, ignition and grip ends. The flat torque handlebar with our Base Rubber grips offer good grip and a relaxed seating position that is already in the bobber style,” Thunderbike says about the build.

As with most of the other projects the garage is responsible for, the Country Cruiser as they call it uses the stock Harley engine. In this case, we’re talking about a 107ci Milwaukee Eight with no enhancements.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Thunderbike’s Country Cruiser.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Common Sense With Face Masks and New Limited Edition Balance Bikes

In these uncertain times, we need to use common sense when away from home. This includes wearing face masks, do we wear them under our helmets or not? Here at AMERiders we don’t want to completely keep the frowny faces on, we want to let you know about Harley-Davidson’s Limited Edition Balance Bikes also.

So the big question Do we wear face masks under our Helmet?

Come on people this is actually common sense.

No matter where you live, by now you’ve no doubt heard that wearing a mask can help prevent the spread of COVID-19. If you’re unable to stay home and must be around other people, the CDC and similar public health organizations around the world recommend both the wearing of masks and also maintaining a 6-foot (or 2 meter) social distance from other people.  

What about when you’re on a motorcycle, though? Do you need to wear a mask if you’re on your bike? What about if you’re wearing a full-face helmet? Even before the pandemic struck, some riders, such as myself, chose to wear balaclavas under our helmets for various reasons. Among other things, they help keep the inside of your helmet from getting gunked up with sweat, hair products, sunscreen, and makeup. In the winter, they can help keep you warm, and moisture-wicking ones are great for summer riding comfort, as well. However, they’re a choice and not a requirement anywhere, as far as I know. 

The surgical and cloth face masks that most medical authorities advise wearing to stop the spread of COVID-19 are a different matter, however. Rules and recommendations vary by health authority, so you should check with your local health department to see what is legally required and also what is advised for your health. Just because a mask is not legally required certainly doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t wear one if you prefer to do so.  

common sense

However, wearing a mask underneath a full-face motorcycle helmet seems like it might be overkill. In fact, back when obtaining personal protective equipment was almost universally difficult for medical providers in the U.S., the Journal of the American Medical Association actually recommended wearing full-face motorcycle helmets with visors as a valid alternative to medical-grade PPE, in a pinch. The consensus seemed to be that while it wasn’t ideal, it was at least something. Welding masks and ice hockey face shields started showing up as alternative options around the same time, for the same reason. 

Obviously, good full-face motorcycle helmets offer ventilation and airflow. While that makes them good for riding your bike, that also means that they’re far from perfect tools to prevent the spread of viral droplets. However, all the other types of masks that aren’t N95-grade also don’t do a whole lot to block tiny coronavirus particles. It’s not difficult to see why the idea of some type of physical barrier might be preferable to none, even if they’re not completely ideal. 

The thing about motorcyclists is, we’re everywhere. We’re in every profession, have every type of job, and many of us ride to and from those jobs every day. It should come as no surprise that a doctor who’s also a rider has publicly considered the question of wearing a mask under a full-face helmet during the current pandemic. 

“Surgical masks restrict your breathing. This can be fatal at high speeds when your adrenalin kicks in. Adrenalin will cause your heartbeat to double depending on your speed. This, in effect, will make you breathe faster and these masks will restrict your breathing and give your heart a hard time. Next, your brain will also suffer due to lack of oxygen until you blackout,” Dr. Tommy Lim told MotoPinas

He went on to add that several other factors, both predictable and not, could contribute to difficulties breathing with a mask under a full-face helmet. Heat, humidity, a sudden accident up ahead that brings traffic to a hot and sticky crawl, you name it.  

For our safety, both while riding and functioning in the world off our bikes during the pandemic, carrying our masks tucked safely away in a pocket is probably a good idea. It’s also probably best to clean our hands after taking our helmets off, and before putting those masks on our faces. The current CDC recommendation is to either wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or use a hand sanitizer that has greater than 60 percent ethanol or 70 percent isopropanol content. Carrying a small bottle of hand sanitizer on our bikes is probably the most practical thing to do if we want to put masks on our faces right after taking our helmets off.

My two cents on the matter…. Use common sense.

New Limited Edition Balance Bikes from H-D

Sooner or later, the day arrives when the kids in your life start learning how to balance on bicycles. Whether it’s your kid, a niece or nephew, or even your best friend’s kid, it’s a pretty standard rite of passage. That’s why Harley-Davidson is asking if you’re a motorcycle fan, why not get the kid in your life an IRONe balance bike instead of just a regular old bicycle?  

These electric bikes help teach kids aged 3 to 7 years old and under 75 pounds about hand-eye coordination and balance, like a bicycle. Then, when the child is ready, there’s a powered mode complete with a throttle. If a kid in your circle gets excited when they see your motorcycle, this is a great way to encourage that budding motorcycle love and build valuable skills that they’ll use for a lifetime.  

common sense

While both the IRONe12 and the IRONe16 have already been available at Harley-Davidson dealerships across the U.S., the Motor Company just announced a special Limited Edition version. Only 550 units will be available, and they come in the LiveWire Yellow Fuse colorway. Make the kid in your life giggle with glee when your yellow LiveWire matches their balance bike.

“The Limited Edition IRONe12 and IRONe16 are impressively custom and extremely limited,” said Jon Bekefy, general manager of brand marketing at Harley-Davidson Motor Company. “No other Harley-Davidson shares the Yellow Fuse color exclusive to LiveWire, which is the halo of the H-D EV portfolio.” 

These Limited Edition bikes also get a custom graphic treatment that sets them apart from the regular IRONe12 and IRONe16 bikes. While you’d normally expect a Limited Edition variant to carry a premium price as compared to its non-limited version, both limited IRONe bikes only cost US $50 over the base price. The standard IRONe12 carries an MSRP of $649, while the Limited Edition IRONe12 is $699. Meanwhile, the standard IRONe16 starts at $699 and the limited IRONe16 starts at $749.  Not bad for limited edition pricing.

Remember though, think hard and use common sense before spending a large amount of money on a “toy” like this some children don’t play with certain toys for very long and they sit by the wayside after a month. You don’t want to spend near $800 bucks for a dust collector.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Common Sense With Face Masks and New Limited Edition Balance Bikes.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

2020 Sturgis Bike Rally Is Still Expected to Proceed in Light of COVID-19

It is so on! The hundreds-of-thousands of leather-clad bikers are saying regarding the 2020 Sturgis Bike rally that is still expected to proceed this August in light of the coronavirus pandemic. Could the current coronavirus outbreak put a damper on the party? We don’t think a virus is going to hold a few bikers back. AMERiders has the story.

For ten days every August, the sleepy little town of Sturgis, South Dakota, roars to life with the rumble of exhaust as the entire region is inundated with hundreds-of-thousands of leather-clad bikers. This year the (80th) 2020 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is scheduled for August 7 through August 16, Amidst COVID-19.

Director of the rally and events, Jerry Cole, expects that this year’s rally will proceed as usual. Cole says that while things are still uncertain, the rally is still almost five months out and he’s optimistic that things will get better before then. With that in mind, he and his staff are still planning for the event as they always have. He’s not ignoring the threat, however. Cole and his team are staying up to date with regards to the virus and are in contact with the state health authority and the governor’s office. 

“We’re hoping that things will get under control, and we will go from there. If things change, we will let people know,” Says Cole. 

“We’re 100 % on planning the rally,” said Sturgis Mayor Mark Carstensen at a news briefing at Sturgis’ City Hall on March 25th. He went on to say that with the rally five months away, he hopes that the virus will have run much of its course by then. The city council has said it would make an official decision in mid-June on whether to go forward with hosting the event.

That’s good news, considering that this year is the 80th Sturgis Rally so it promises to be bigger than usual as banner years usually are. People travel from all over the world to participate in the wild party that is Sturgis. 

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally was founded by the Jackpine Gypsies motorcycle club in 1938, and has been held every year except for when it was put on hiatus for a couple of years during World War Two. While for years, it was exclusive to American made bikes like Harleys and Indians, these days, all bikes are welcome. 

In April the Sturgis Rally posted the City of Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Consideration Protocols which shows just how much the city relies on the rally.

2020 Strugis

The legendary Buffalo Chip has already booked big name acts like Willie Nelson, ZZ Top, Shinedown, Puddle of Mudd, and the very last show for classic rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd. Meanwhile, the Iron Horse Saloon offers nightly free concerts featuring bands such as Skillet, Fozzy, and Killswitch Engage. While the Full Throttle Saloon hasn’t named much more than Jackyl, you can expect them to have some amazing acts as well. Considering that it’s only March, you can count on more bands being announced between now and August.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the 2020 Sturgis Bike Rally.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

A Transparent Harley-Davidson Gas Tank? Why Yes Please!

We talked to you about the Apex Predator last week the winner that was crowned King of Kings custom bike building competition. The Predator was, of course, a great build, but that doesn’t mean the ones who lost are anything less. One of the 15 entries the “Daytona’s Red” had a transparent Harley-Davidson Gas Tank which is just way too cool, AMERiders has the story.

King of Kings was the culmination of a years-old custom bike challenge called Battle of the Kings (BOTK). All the entries for the final, bikes customized by the bike maker’s international dealers, were previous winners of BOTK.

Among the most exciting projects was that of the Harley-Davidson Barcelona shop. The bike, called Daytona’s Red, was initially a Harley-Davidson Roadster, and even if the custom work is done to it didn’t make it something else entirely, this two-wheeled machine sure does look different than any other roadsters out there.

The thing that stands out the most is the crazy fuel tank the bike is fitted with. At its origins a stock Harley tank, it has been modified by hand to include a transparent section through which the gasoline and even the fuel pump in operation can be seen.

The garage chose the Roadster for its project because “it is the most racing bike in the Harley-Davidson range.”

“We have been inspired by the history of Harley-Davidson racing looking for a more racing style of motorcycle, differentiating ourselves from the most common styles in customization contests,” the garage says.

The bike has been modified with more than just the exclusive tank. Several other parts were added, most of them built in house, including the exhaust, grips, and headlights. As a touch of class, the turn signals were integrated in the brake lever, it too built by hand.

Even with all those remade parts, the Barcelona crew stayed true to the rules of the competition. They state that the base motorcycle needs to be a Harley-Davidson, the customization be worth at most €6,000 ($6,500), and the bike be road legal.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Transparent Harley-Davidson Gas Tank.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.