Category Archives: Middle Of The Road

As the Days Get Shorter Here Are Some Tips for Your Night Riding

As the days get shorter, that means night riding and trying to stretch the riding season out for as long as we can of course. Some of us never stop riding through winter. Night riding opens up a whole new set of hazards, though, mainly related to seeing and being seen. Here’s how to prepare yourself to be a night rider. AMERiders gives you a few tips on how to see and be seen at night.

Upgrade Your Lighting

Without the sun to light your way, you have to rely on whatever light your bike can throw in front of you to see where you’re going. Stock headlights range in quality from pretty good to utterly abysmal, so this is a good place to start. In the past, running more powerful halogen bulbs has been a popular solution. This draws more power from your already weak electrical system, though. Plus, your wiring harness may not be able to handle the extra power. A great solution is LED bulbs. Not only do they produce more light, but they also draw less power than your original halogen bulb. The light they produce is also a pure white rather than halogen’s yellowish tinge, which is a bit more eye-catching. Make sure you invest in a good bulb.

night

While you’re at it, put an LED bulb in your tail light(s), too. It(they) will last longer, and your brake light(s) will be more visible thanks to its instant-on nature. You can upgrade your turn signals to LED as well, but this often involves some shenanigans with resistors, relays, and such to keep them flashing at the correct speed.

Add More Lighting

In addition to the lights the bike came with, you can also add more of your own. The Honda PC800’s headlight beam pattern is terrible, to the point where not even a Cyclops bulb helped improve it much. Adding a pair of cheap LED driving lights from SuperBrightLEDs.com to supplement the weak headlight made a difference. Look for a “spot” beam pattern, which throws light a good distance down the road while still illuminating the sides just a bit. Pencil beams are good for high-speed highway riding. Flood beams will only light the general area right in front of you, so while they’re good work lights, avoid them for this purpose. Whatever you get, be careful to aim them away from oncoming drivers’ eyes. You don’t want to have them swerve into you due to their target fixation on your bright lights.

Again, tail lights are worth upgrading, too, so you can be seen from behind. When a friend replaced their Honda Shadow’s turn signals, they tied them in with the stock tail light so that when they weren’t flashing as a turn signal they shined steadily, giving them three tail lights instead of one. they used red turn signals for this purpose since most states frown upon amber tail lights. Another friend used had a Honda PC800, he used an AdMore Lighting’s kit to install LED brake, turn, and tail lights in his Givi top trunk. This puts a complete second set of lights at drivers’ eye level, making them quite difficult to ignore. He also added a brake light flasher that briefly flickers the LEDs before they shine steadily, again to get drivers’ attention. This may or may not be 100% legal, as it’s a flashing red light. My friends have not had any trouble from law enforcement yet, however, just to be safe, though, unplug these lights for state inspection, since the bike’s original lighting still works fine.

Reflective Tape

You don’t have to rely on your own lighting to be seen. Reflective tape lights up your bike from other people’s headlights, making you even brighter than before. Some people go nuts with white, yellow, amber, and red tape everywhere. Some even like the blacked-out look adding several strips of black reflective tape to the saddlebags. The black strips are invisible during the day but lit up white at night to make you much more visible.

You can get as creative as you want with this. Cut out pretty designs. Stick it anywhere you want, including your helmet or jacket. Some riding gear comes with reflective piping sewn into it, which is also helpful.

Slow Down And Watch Out

We’ve covered how to see and be seen, but it’s also worth mentioning that you should change the way you ride at night. You should only ride as fast as you can see, and be able to stop within the distance your lights shine ahead of you. As tempting as an empty highway in the middle of the night can be for high-speed shenanigans, think of the deer crossing the road that you may not see until it’s too late. Another hazard is drivers who set off with only their daytime running lights on, leaving them completely unlit from behind.

As always, you have to watch out for “the other guy,” and that’s even truer for your night riding. It’s much more likely that other people on the road have been drinking at night than during the day. If it’s particularly late, people will be tired, which can adversely affect driving ability almost as much as alcohol.

Even if you haven’t upgraded your lighting or added any reflective tape, this is one step you can take on any bike to be safer on the road. Of course, upgrading your lights lets you see farther down the road, which lets you increase your speed. Even then, though, you should slow down a bit from your daytime pace.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information Some Tips for Your Night Riding.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Pesky Traffic Signal Lights and How We Motorcyclists Can Fix Them.

Ah, the pesky traffic signal. Far too often, they can be the bane of your existence—especially when you’re out riding. Do you feel like you hit every single traffic light while you’re on your way somewhere ? Or do you feel like that pesky traffic signal just simply doesn’t see you at all? We at AMERiders give you a few tips to help you fix it.

It’s super frustrating, because there you are, riding your bike, probably enjoying your day. It doesn’t matter if you’re on your way somewhere specific, or if you’re just out for a fun weekend jaunt and exploring some great routes wherever you live. Either way, you’re there, aren’t you? So why the hell don’t those signals always see you?

How Traffic Signal Sensors Work (In The US)

Some of you inevitably know the answer, but for those who might not, traffic signals in the US primarily work using inductive loop detectors, or ILDs. If you’ve ever noticed those weird cuts in the roadway up toward the stop line, that are usually in either a circle or square shape, that’s the big wire loop with sensors for each direction of traffic at that intersection. They’re usually installed about two to four inches beneath the road surface. 

Since you can see them, you can more easily position yourself to take advantage of them if you know how they work— and if they’re calibrated to sense your bike in the first place. Conductive material, such as steel, is what tells those sensors a vehicle is there. 

Of course, that all depends on you knowing that they’re there in the first place. Since you ride a motorcycle, you’re probably more observant than a lot of car drivers. After all, you kind of have to be if you want to stay alive and make good decisions based on how other road users are misbehaving around you.

Cars have an advantage not because they weigh more, but because their conductive bits physically cover a larger area than that of bikes. As a result, they’re more likely to trigger those wire loop sensors. If there’s a car around, you might be able to wave it up so that the sensors can detect it—provided the driver understands what you’re trying to get them to do. Otherwise, you might be SOL.

That Sucks, But What Can I Do About It?

You can try mounting a magnet down low on your frame if your bike regularly has trouble triggering sensors, which can help. It’s no guarantee, but a little trial and error with where you mount it might also be in order.

Individual towns usually decide the sensitivities of traffic light sensors within their borders. If you notice that one particular traffic light that you always hit on your way to work never, ever sees you, you could take it up with your local government. Once again, your results may vary. 

Apart from the problem of simple laziness, setting the sensitivity too high can apparently run the risk of false triggers for the light, according to the Federal Highway Administration. Additional adjustments—and perhaps some allowance for trial and error—might be necessary to get the sensor settings dialed in just right.

traffic signal
Two FHWA engineers discuss sensor settings at a junction box prior to running tests at a TFHRC research intersection to determine whether the sensor is detecting small vehicles like bicycles and motorcycles.

Some states also have laws in place that allow you to legally run a red light if certain very specific conditions are met, as an attempt to get around signals that might not sense your bike. A handy roundup of states that allow this from Business Insider is a few years old, so you might want to double-check your state’s current laws, just to be safe.

Some states have passed “safe on red” laws that allow motorcyclists to legally drive through red lights, to help alleviate the aggravation of being stuck at a traffic light that takes an excruciating amount of time — what feels like hours — to turn green.

Finally, some traffic signals in large metropolitan areas work on timers, so they’ll eventually turn green and aren’t as much of a problem for bikes if you’re patient. There may also be other ways that traffic signals are actuated in other countries—if you have one, please tell us about it!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the dreaded and pesky traffic signal and how to fix them.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Could A New Liner Technology Become the Future for the Helmet Liner?

Could This New Technology Be the Future for Motorcycle Helmet Liners? If it is it could mean a Safer, more efficient helmet liner, AMERiders is all for that.

While today’s helmets are more efficient than they’ve ever been since we started protecting our noggins, the technology to protect our grey matter never ceases to improve. Expanded polystyrene has become the material of choice for impact absorption, but new technologies are emerging.

From fluid pads to Multi-directional Impact Protection System (MIPS), the evolution of helmet technology never ends. The next big thing in head protection could become Koroyd tubes. 

The technology itself has been around for a few years now, initially documented in bicycle helmets. Koroyd uses tiny plastic tubes rather than foam to absorb impacts. The straw-like tubes are thermowelded to one another in a honeycomb pattern. The polymer material used in the manufacturing of the tubes is thinner than an inflated bead of polystyrene, which leaves more space for air—the main player in shock absorption in helmets. The walls of the tubes have a thickness of 0.09mm and the diameter of the tubes themselves ranges between 3 and 6mm. The thickness of the protector and size of the tubes vary with the application and the type of helmet.

Instead of the expanded beads of polystyrene getting squished under an impact, the tubes absorb energy by crumpling, meaning a certain quantity of air remains in the tubes even after an impact. This results in a more consistent efficiency during an impact. Koroyd is able to absorb more energy, more consistently. 

In addition, the higher compression rate helps reduce the risks of a fracture. Because the protective layer is able to absorb more energy, it also reacts better to different types of impacts (direct or angled) and reduces the rotational momentum of a head impact. 

Also, instead of banking on a very sudden (and often violent) deceleration like with EPS—which may cause the brain to shift inside the head—Koroyd’s impact absorption allows the material to cause a smoother deceleration for a prolonged period of time. 

Bonus: in the case of small impacts, the tubes are even able to bounce back, meaning the protective material doesn’t lose its integrity. Read: there’s a chance you wouldn’t need to replace your helmet after a small hiccup—the material is flexible enough not to be damaged in a small impact scenario.  

Ultimately, the tiny polymer tubes are also more resistant to wear than EPS (no evaporating glues or materials affected by sweat and body oils) and therefore more durable, lighter, and create a far more breathable protective barrier with plenty of airflow. Until now, Koroyd has been used mainly in bicycle helmets, but the Klim F5  Koroyd (launched last year) adventure helmet is now offered with the new technology. 

The technology currently costs more than the production of EPS foam which is why the technology isn’t as widespread as it could be. That being said, there is at least one Koroyd-equipped motorcycle helmet out there you can get your hands on at the moment—the Klim F5 Koroyd comes in at $650 and uses both the Koroyd layering as well as the MIPS technology. If the company’s claims are accurate, this could be the safest motorcycle helmet out there.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Mistakes

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Koroyd technology.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.


Get off the Phone Because I’m Sorry Isn’t Good Enough! Words from Icons.

Dear cagers, get off your damn phone. Love, everybody, especially motorcyclists. This message is simple, and it’s being hammered home by a rider from Arvada, Colorado.  Nathan Maes was riding his Kawasaki on a normal day when the driver behind failed to notice that Maes was slowing for a red light. AMERiders gives you the interview and story and then a few words from some icons in the industry.

“It was just, like green confetti, everywhere,” said Maes, who was slammed into the back of a pick-up truck after the impact from the texting driver, before he was able to get to his feet. His Kawasaki Ninja 650 was totaled.

Police in Colorado charged the driver with careless driving, but despite an admission from the driver that he was texting, cannot charge him with texting while driving. That’s because, in Colorado, police have to actually witness the crash in order to charge someone under the state’s distracted driving laws. “He said, ‘You know, I was just looking at my phone for two seconds, I was just sending a quick text,’” Maes said in an interview with local news.

This story comes as distracted driving and general poor behavior on the roads is on the increase. Deaths caused by drivers who went through red lights hit a 10-year high last year, and many believe this is because of distracted drivers, who miss a red light while texting. A Canadian study found that in 2016 more people were killed or injured by distracted driving than any other infringement, including speeding and driving under the influence.

There are things we can do motorcyclists to mitigate the risks that distracted driving poses. Maes says he was looking in the rearview mirror but couldn’t avoid being struck. We should always be watching our mirrors when braking for any reason, and always line up towards the edge of the lane we’re in. That way, we have an escape path if we notice that a car behind is not going to stop in time.

No amount of risk mitigation and road positioning can change this one simple fact: Drivers who use their cell phones while behind the wheel can and do kill people. So, please, for the love of all that is good and right in the world, put your phone down.

Now Words from our Icons.

Public safety films are amazing time capsules sometimes, but they rarely feature motorcycling icons like Peter Fonda and Evel Knievel. If you’ve never seen the short film Not So Easy, you’re in for a treat that’s surprisingly not as dated as you might expect.

Clearly, both motorcycle safety and riding skills have come a long way since this film’s 1973 release. Bikes and safety gear technology have both greatly advanced. Unfortunately, the number of things that make other road users—especially car drivers—take their eyes off the road have increased over time, as well.

Knievel’s advice that you should a) be ATGATT ( all the gear all the time ) and b) familiarize yourself with any new-to-you bike you hop on is timeless. Likewise, Fonda’s admonition that, “For some reason, most car drivers just don’t seem to see bikes, so you’ve got to think of them as asleep, blind, or drunk,” is, unfortunately, an eternal truth. So, why Evel Knievel and Peter Fonda? They would totally rally behind the “don’t text and drive crusade” I don’t like it either.

Well, as for Fonda—once Easy Rider put him on the map, he said he never lacked for work. That’s a plus when you’re obsessed with motorcycles, as he was—it was never just an acting job for him, it was a true and lifelong passion. He passed away at the age of 79 earlier this year, which is, quite coincidentally, the same age that Not So Easy director Cliff ‘Soney’ Vaughs was when he passed a few years back. 

As for Knievel, could there be a more appropriate ambassador for motorcycle safety from the early ‘70s? I mean, the man suffered enough bone fractures in his life that no one could quite agree on how many breaks he’d suffered, according to the Billings Gazette. More to the point, he lived to talk about them later—so clearly, even wearing gear of the time made a huge difference.

All three of these legends are remembered fondly—and with constant rediscoveries of videos like these, their legacies live on forever.

Stuff to remember!!!

With all this said AMERiders reminds you to Stay off the phone while your driving… PERIOD… Texting, Talking anything. It takes your attention off the road, plus your reaction time is slower as well. Most phones have a driving setting on them now. If you need to use the phone pull over. It may save not only a motorcyclists life but if you hit another cager it could save yours as well.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

AMERiders reminds you to Get off the Phone Because I’m Sorry Isn’t Good Enough! and leaves you with some Words from motorcycle Icons.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Indian Motorcycles Gives Us Two New Models for the 2020 Scout Lineup

Indian Motorcycle is celebrating 100 years of the Scout in 2020, which is a milestone not many motorcycle companies have been able to reach. For the occasion, the company gives us two new models for the 2020 Scout Lineup to highlight the jubilee.  AMERiders shows you what they look like.

2020 Scout

We actually had a hunch they were coming. As we documented Wed, two new “100th-anniversary” editions of the Scout were listed in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) filings. It was a very obvious hint at the addition of the celebratory editions of the model to the upcoming lineup.

Indian has now confirmed our suspicions with the official launch of its 2020 Scout lineup—including the limited-edition Scout 100th Anniversary and the all-new Scout Bobber Twenty. “100 years is an incredibly special milestone, and it made perfect sense to honor Scout’s history and legacy with these two heritage-inspired 2020 models,” commented Reid Wilson, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle.

Indian has now confirmed our suspicions with the official launch of its 2020 Scout lineup—including the limited-edition Scout 100th Anniversary and the all-new Scout Bobber Twenty. “100 years is an incredibly special milestone, and it made perfect sense to honor Scout’s history and legacy with these two heritage-inspired 2020 models,” commented Reid Wilson, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle.

Gallery: 2020 Indian Scout 100th Anniversary

The Scout 100th Anniversary sports a livery inspired by the original 1920 Scout—the dark red paint decorated with golden pinstripes and accents. Other features of this special edition include 100th Anniversary badging, a tan leather saddle, the black spoke wheels, a braced handlebar, luggage racks and of course, plenty of chrome to check out your reflection in. Only 750 units of the 100th Anniversary will be produced worldwide. Pricing has been set at $15,999—not the most expensive limited edition we’ve seen. 

Gallery: 2020 Indian Scout Bobber Twenty

  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout

The Scout Bobber Twenty is officially part of the 2020 lineup—no limited numbers on this one like with the 100th Anniversary. The Twenty—for nineteen twenty—is a bit of a different homage to the Scout, taking the bobber style a step further down memory lane. The model is offered in your choice of black, metallic red or matte forest green livery. The standard model is available with ape hangers, a brown leather floating saddle, spoke wheels, and blacked-out exhaust tips. A collection of accessories allows you to modify the look of the bike slightly with the addition of more chrome surfaces. The Bobber Twenty is offered standard (non-ABS) at $11,999 or with ABS at $12,899.

The Bobber Twenty, which is meant to evoke the original 1920 G-20 Scout, a model later made famous by land speed racer Burt Munro — the subject of the film The World’s Fastest Indian.

Both special edition models share the exact same platform and engine as the standard Scout—the classic 1,133 cc V-twin—so no changes here. 

Of course, the three Scout models we’re already familiar with are also returning for 2020, clad in a new choice of colors. All three versions of the Scout receive a few minor upgrades including new floating brake discs, calipers, and master cylinder. The Bobber lineup also receives a set of Pirelli MT60RS tires and the Scout, a new sport seat and passenger footpegs. 

Pricing for the 2020 model-year lineup remains unchanged from 2019. The baby Scout Sixty comes in at $8,999 and is offered in a choice of black, burgundy, or pearl white color schemes. The Scout Bobber is priced at $10,999 with a choice of five liveries: Thunder Black, Thunder Black Smoke, Deepwater Metallic, Bronze Smoke and White Smoke. Finally, the Scout remains set at $11,499 and is offered in a choice of five colors: Thunder Black, White Smoke, Deepwater Metallic, Metallic Jade over Thunder Black and Indian Motorcycle Red over Ivory Cream with Gold Pinstripe. Note that all the non-ABS versions of the Scout will be available in Thunder Black only, including the Bobber Twenty. 

To allow buyers to personalize their Scout and improve their bike’s versatility, Indian also launches a collection of accessories that includes new exhaust and muffler options that improve the bikes’ performance, a quick-release fairing, a solo luggage rack and rack bag, semi-rigid saddlebags, a rider comfort seat, bar-end mirrors, tinted windshield, different handlebars, and much more. 

The new Scout lineup is now up for grabs, including the two new special editions. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Two New 2020 Scout Models.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.


2020 Brings About the Indian Scout 100th Anniversary & Special Editions

The year 2020 will set a number of milestones in the motorcycle industry. Aside from the flock of new models we’re expecting to kickstart the new decade, 2020 will also mark a turning point in emission standards with the official implementation of the Euro 5 regulations. At Indian’s, there’s, of course, the Challenger expected to make its debut in the upcoming months. There is also a very special anniversary that’s about to be celebrated: the Scout will turn 100 and the company has every intention of celebrating.  AMERiders gives you a bit of information on Indian Scout 100th Anniversary.

Scout 100th Anniversary
All new 100th anniversary scout

In fact, according to the latest California Air Resources Board (CARB) executive orders, Indian is preparing one, maybe even two, special-edition Scouts for the model’s jubilee. The document lists an Indian Scout 100th Anniversary—likely the very same one spotted at the dealers’ meeting earlier this month. The special model will sport the original, classic Scout look with the deep red livery and yellow pinstripes. Some sources also suggest that the Scout Bobber Twenty (for 1920) listed in the document is also meant as a celebratory edition of the model’s history. 

I don’t know about you but those sound really pretty and I would love to own one, but my garage isn’t big enough nor do I make enough.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Indian Scout 100th Anniversary.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

What’s the Cheapest Harley Why It’s the IRONe12 and IRONe16 of Course

What’s the Cheapest Harley Why It’s the IRONe12 and IRONe16 of Course! The last time we talked about the cheapest Harley it was a Lego model well this isn’t that one this will cost you almost $700 dollars. Don’t go getting all excited…. you more than likely can’t ride it. Your kid on the other can. Meet the IRONe12 and IRONe16. AMERiders gives you the info.

IRONe12 and IRONe16
IRONe12 and IRONe16

The most affordable Harley-Davidsons are now up for grabs for less than $700. What’s the catch? Well, technically speaking, there isn’t one—only that you’re not getting a Milwaukee-Eight for that price. More like a tiny 2-Ah electric motor. 

We already know that Harley-Davidson has been trying to go after a younger audience to keep the hype alive but it jumped from one pole to the other. Earlier this year, the company announced it had purchased StayCyc, a company that specializes in balance bikes for kids. If you’re going to build a future generation of Harlistas, you might as well get them started young!

Harley has now officially launched its new electric push bikes for kids, dubbed the IRONe12 and IRONe16—a namesake meant to transcend the machismo and muscle of a full-size Harley, wrapped up in a Happy Meal box with a toy on the side. Is that what we call… irony? Iron-e, get it? Moving on.

IRONe12 and IRONe16

Pricing is set between $649 for the 12 version and $699 for the 16—the cheapest (new) Harleys you can get your hands on! While there is a difference in electric output, the nomenclature of the IRONe is actually based on the size of the wheels (12 inches versus 16). The 12 targets a younger, 3-to-5 y.o. audience. The tiny bike weighs in at 17 lb and seat height reaches 13 inches. The 16 is slightly bigger at 19 lb with a seat height of 17 inches, allowing kids 5 to 7 to transition to a slightly more powerful bike. 

IRONe12 and IRONe16

Both bikes are fully electric and can be used like actual tiny electric motorcycles thanks to the electric motor that sends power to the back wheel via a classic twist throttle. They are equipped with three riding modes (Training, Standard, Advanced) which adapt the bike’s top speed to the young rider’s experience. Training is set at 5 mph, Standard at 7 mph (7.5 mph on the 16), and Advanced maxes out at 9 mph (11 mph on the 16). Charging time varies between 30 and 60 minutes. 

So here’s one way to get your kid started on two-wheels, and on a Harley of all things! You know, get the Orange-and-Black blood pumping right away.  How about a great Birthday or Christmas Present Huh? They would love you.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the IRONe12 and IRONe16 electric motorcycles.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

A Leak from Indian’s Dealers’ Meeting About the New Indian Challenger

Man, those dealers meetings are like trying to keep the lid on Pandora’s box. We’ve been treated to a number of leaks (desired or not) captured by enthusiastic dealers looking for a bit of Internet fame. While at the end of last year, the juicier sneak peeks came from Triumph, this time, we’re heading over to Indian’s for a look at the New Indian Challenger. This time, there’s even a video! AMERiders has the info.

A look at the all-new Challenger from Indian

We knew it was coming. In fact, back in April, the test mule of a new, fully-faired tourer was spotted out in the wild, clad in leather to try and hide the details from nosy onlookers. A moderately successful attempt considering people figured they were looking at something different.

Comparing the quirky headlight design to the mule’s confirms that this is actually the same bike. The central round headlight is framed between LED brackets, a very recognizable design observed on the test mule. According to the presentation, the model will receive the name “Challenger”, a name the company trademarked in April as well. 

The presentation also highlights a new engine, the Powerplus 108, the patent for which was released in March by Polaris.  According to early reports, the 108 cubic-in block (1,770cc) should be a water-cooled, 60-degree V-twin and is expected to produce 120 horsepower. 

The engine was apparently a former design meant for a new Victory Cross Country—the brand Indian “replaced” when it was given the sack in 2017. With Victory gone, whatever was left one the shelves was Polaris’ to dispose of. In the case of the 108 mill, the only logical choice was to send it over to the guys at Indian. Already then, according to the person who shared that information, the names “Charger” and “Challenger” were being bounced around. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the New Indian Challenger.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Harley-Davidson Rolls out the new 2020 models, what beauties they are.

Harley-Davidson just announced its 2020 model year lineup, and there are no major shakeups to report. Director Jason already told you his thoughts on the 2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire, which is Harley’s first stab at an electric bike. While we all have our favorites, there are also four other new models headed to H-D showrooms across the land.  Which I am tickled pink to say that my hometown H-D showroom is getting a set of the 2020 models. AMERiders lets you know a bit of information about them and gives you some sweet pictures courtesy of H-D.

However, we need to also let you know something else before we start showing these beauties. You tech-savvy people will like to know that Harley’s Reflex Brembo ABS system, which was previously an available option on some touring models, is now standard across all 2020 touring models. That’s good news for you if you’re buying one, because as we’ve discussed before, ABS is totally worth having.  Now on to the 2020 Models.

Sportster lineup

2020 H-D Sporster Lineup

The Sportster line is getting a tad of a trim down as neither the SuperLow, Forty-Eight Special or 1200 Custom return from 2019. Below are the 2020 Sporster Lineup pictures.

2020 Harley Softails

2020 models
2020 Harley Softails

The big news in the 2020 Harley Softail line is the addition of the 2020 Low Rider S. The model was previously a Dyna but was discontinued in 2017. Other highlights of the 2020 Softail line is the restyling of the 2020 Heritage Classic. Just about everything that was previously blacked-out is now dressed up in chrome.

The list is lengthy on theses 2020 models– air cleaner, covers, steel laced wheels, headlamp bucket, auxiliary light buckets, fork legs, fork covers, rear fender struts, and side covers, console, and a chrome riser and top clamp for the polished stainless steel handlebar. Meanwhile, the 2020 Heritage Classic 114, powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 114, will still have blacked-out components.

2020 Touring Models

2020 models
2020 Tourers

On the touring front, the 2020 Road Glide Limited is in and the Road Glide Ultra is out. Differences between the two are subtle, the Limited version receiving some fresh pinstripes, a gloss-finish on its inner fairing, heated rider hand grips, Slicer II Contrast Bright wheels and new tank, front and rear fender medallions. Dynamically, the long-range touring version of the Road Glide is still powered by a Milwaukee-Eight 114, has Reflex Electronic Linked Brakes and Harley’s improved touch-screen Boom! Box GTS infotainment system. Harley does offer one noteworthy new wrinkle for the 2020 Road Glide Limited. It can be outfitted with Harley’s new Reflex Defensive Rider Systems, an upgraded electronics package with cornering ABS, linked brakes and traction control, as well as a drag-torque slip control system that functions when cornering as well in addition to Harley’s new “Vehicle Hold Control” which keeps bikes from rolling backwards on hills.

Welcome to the CVO Club ……

CVO Tri Glide

And while the focus of Harley’s Custom Vehicle Operations (CVO) line has been on its touring models recently, 2020 is the first time a three-wheeler has crept into the CVO lineup. The 2020 CVO Tri Glide is powered by a Milwaukee-Eight 117, the largest engine Harley offers in a production motorcycle. The 1923cc powerplant puts out a reported 125 lb-ft of torque, numbers bolstered by a high-performance intake and camshaft. It has a dual-bending valve fork and emulsion rear.

The CVO Tri Glide has both a built-in, power locking trunk with 50 pounds of storage capacity in addition to a Tour-Pak. The list of high-end goodies is impressive, from its Tomahawk Contrast Cut cast aluminum wheels to heated grips, pegs, floorboards and muffler tips from Harley’s Kahuna Collection. The aforementioned Reflex Defensive Rider Systems adapted specifically for three-wheelers comes standard. Premium paint is always part of the CVO package, and the 2020 CVO Tri Glide is offered in either Blizzard White with a three-stripe graphic pattern, Gray Contrast Cut wheels and Bright Chrome finishes or Black Stardust with a three-stripe graphic pattern, Gloss Black Contrast Cut wheels and Bright Chrome finishes. 

2020 models
H-D Connect service

The final storyline coming out of the Harley camp for 2020 is the introduction of the H-D Connect service. It is a subscription-based service utilized through a smartphone via the updated Harley-Davidson App. One of its most appealing features is its security function which allows riders to remotely monitor whether someone is tampering with their bike. It can help owners track down a stolen motorcycle, too. The H-D Connect service also allows riders to remotely check a wide range of data including high-voltage battery charge status or fuel level, available range, tire pressure (on Tire Pressure Monitoring System-equipped models), ride mode (on equipped models), odometer, infotainment software updates where applicable, and riding statistics.

Livewire

The service is particularly beneficial to LiveWire owners who can use the H-D App “to search for, and navigate to, compatible charge station locations, and while charging, view time to completion and receive charging alerts without having to physically be near the motorcycle.” Another useful feature is the ability to send Harley owners service reminders.

2020 Models
HD Connect App

The H-D Connect service is a standard feature on 2020 Touring models (except the Road King/S and Electra Glide Standard), Tri Glide Ultra, CVOs, and the LiveWire. Harley-Davidson motorcycles equipped with H-D Connect service include a cellular telematics control unit (TCU). The H-D Connect service will be offered for a one-year free trial period with the purchase of a new, untitled 2020 model year Harley-Davidson motorcycle in the U.S. that is equipped with the H-D Connect service and will be available with a subscription charge following the initial period.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

and

Mistakes

~AMERiders

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Harley Davidson’s 2020 models.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Statistics in from Sturgis, Crashes Are down but Arrests Were up This Year.

Half a million riders descend upon small-town South Dakota each year. This year’s Sturgis Motorcycle Rally saw more felony and misdemeanor drug arrests than last year, with three vehicles seized for drug possession. Ten men were arrested at Sturgis for soliciting sex from minors (thankfully, the fifteen-year-old girls they were trying to meet were in fact police officers posing as kids). Sturgis statistics are in AMERiders gives you the info.

Those of us who have never attended the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally probably think that speeding motorcycles and crashes are what keep the cops at Sturgis busy, but we’re only partly right about that. Along with all the drug arrests, there are lots of crashless DUI arrests during these rallies, too. It doesn’t help that area bars and restaurants actively encourage imbibing during the rally.

Thankfully, this year’s crash numbers involving injuries and fatalities are down from last year, so perhaps fewer riders are drinking and riding. Three people died at Sturgis in 2019, as compared to four in 2018. One of this year’s fatalities, however, was not from a motorcycle crash on the road: a Sturgis attendee succumbed to carbon monoxide poisoning inside his camper.

Statistics
Sturgis Rally Tally Final

It stands to note that in these statistics from Sturgis this year that only two people were killed in crashes. However, there were Four people killed at the 2018 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. That is half maybe next year we will cut it in half again or there will be none. One can only hope.

Though I’ve been steeping in it for more than two decades, motorcycle culture still baffles me at times. Why anyone would drink a bunch of alcohol and then attempt to pilot a motorcycle is absolutely beyond me. For instance the statistics below.

Rally-related DUIs continued to rise this year, with a total of 157 arrests so far compared to 136 arrests over the same period of time in 2018. Drug arrests are also on the rise. 109 arrested on felony drug charges, compared to 64 at this time last year; 192 people have been arrested on misdemeanor drug charges, compared to 150 at this time last year.

I do, however, understand how motorcycles attract a certain personality type. We’re all influenced by the media, and we’ve all been trained to believe that tough guys ride motorcycles, therefore riding a motorcycle makes you a tough guy (or girl).

Read through all of the crash reports from the rally and you might notice a striking similarity among the majority: the riders were not wearing helmets. Say what you will about personal freedoms and choices, but the numbers don’t lie.

However, what is the moral of the story?

Maybe don’t sell drugs at a motorcycle rally.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Statistics from Sturgis 2019.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.