Here Are the Best Motorcycle Roads in America in No Particular Order

While we understand there will be some controversy over this list, we present to you, in no particular order, a list of five of the Best Motorcycle Roads In America that you should get out and take a ride on. Go on a weekday morning when everyone else is at work. We here at AMERiders figured we would give you a best in list since we gave you a worst in list last year, to hopefully get you dreaming of spring.

Best Motorcycle Roads
Cherohala Skyway (Tennessee)

Cherohala Skyway (Tennessee)

While Cherohala Skyway, which connects the 51-mile stretch between Robbinsville, North Carolina, and Tellico Plains, Tennessee, is a great driving road on its own, you can create a loop out of this road along with the Tail of the Dragon. You will be exhausted at the end of the day but with two of the Best Motorcycle Roads in the world in such close proximity means that you can get in a lot of fun without having to endure any highway slogs in between. Note that it is fairly deserted at night and dangerous in the winter months. There are no gas stations or places to eat (but there is the occasional restroom) for the entire length.

Best Motorcycle Roads
Deals Gap—Tail of the Dragon (Tennessee)

Deals Gap—Tail of the Dragon (Tennessee)

Deal’s Gap, or the “Tail of the Dragon,” is an 11-mile stretch along US Route 129 and leads you through Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It tops all the lists when it comes to the best motorcycle roads in America. Though the road is only 11 miles long it contains 318 curves, many of which are named (like “Gravity Cavity” and “Copperhead Corner”).

The speed limit on the road was originally 55mph, but due to its popularity and heavy traffic, it was reduced to 35 in 2005. If you ride this road you will not be able to miss the Tree of Shame, which has motorcycle parts bolted to it and hung off of it by the many people who have crashed there. You will roll through gorgeous Smoky Mountain scenery: lush forests and mountains.

The “Tree of Shame” at the Dragon is sort of like an extremely macabre Shoe Tree. Every piece of motorcycle on the tree is from a (potentially fatal) accident.
Picture courtesy of Jacob Krejci

The Dragon cuts through mountains that were of the last areas of North Carolina to be settled because of the inhospitable terrain. You may have also heard of the Blue Ridge Parkway, which rolls through the “other half” of the southern Appalachian Mountains. The eastern half of the range is the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the western range is the Great Smoky Mountains.

The mountain range spans the borders of Tennessee and North Carolina for 36 miles an is more than 5,000 feet in altitude. There are 16 peaks that measure over 6,000 feet. The mountain roads that cut through the gaps in the mountains naturally are very curvy with a lot of altitude changes: sharp turns, steep drop-offs, and, unfortunately, a ton of traffic, especially on weekends.

Best Motorcycle Roads
Pacific Coast Highway (California)

Pacific Coast Highway (California)

California State Route 1, dubbed the Pacific Coast Highway, is one of the most beautiful motorcycle roads in America. It will take you from Orange County to Mendocino County, but the most notable part of the road are the miles that take you through Big Sur. This particular 123-mile stretch of the PCH will guide you along the rugged cliffs of central California’s coastline, and there are sharp drop-offs, hairpin turns, and heavy fog.

While you will be distracted by the gorgeous scenery, redwood trees, and the Pacific Ocean, you must keep your eyes on the road. Again, this road is published in many guide books and travel sites a not-to-be-missed road trip destination, so there will be traffic. Keep in mind, California law states that if you’re leading a parade of five or more vehicles you must use a turn-out to let them pass.

Best Motorcycle Roads
Skyline Drive (Georgia)

Skyline Drive (Georgia)

Winding for 105 miles north to south between Shenandoah Valley to the east and the Piedmont plateau to the west, 75 overlooks will give you plenty of places to pull over and take pictures so that you’re not trying to ride and ogle at the same time. The roadsides full of wildflowers are intentionally left unmowed and this road’s beauty draws over two million visitors annually.

It’s most popular (and most heavily trafficked) in the fall due to the spectacle of changing leaves It also has a speed limit of 35mph because of the traffic, curves, and wildlife (white-tailed deer, black bears, and wild turkey are common sights on the road). It is the only public road through Shenandoah National Park.

Best Motorcycle Roads
Glacier National Park—4 Going-to-the-Sun Road (Montana)

Glacier National Park—4 Going-to-the-Sun Road (Montana)

This super-smooth paved road is the only major paved route that goes through Glacier National Park, one of the most beautiful National Parks in the entirety of the United States.  It’s only about 50 miles long but is an excellent ride with its smooth asphalt over some challenging twisties. The best part is, there are other roads in the area that are quite nice too, so you’re in for at least a full day’s worth of excellent riding with mountains and valleys, lakes and waterfalls, and the ever-present wildlife.

The road is closed in the winter and It takes crews two months after the snow has passed to simply clear the road for travel. Make sure the road is open before you plan your trip! And, as with any of these popular destinations, try to stay off it on the weekends.

Have you ridden any or all of these roads? What’s your favorite? We here at AMERiders would like to know.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and
Memorial Day

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