Review of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire from Two Different Blogging Sites

It is always nice to find out what a first ride review of a motorcycle for a new year is, and the Harley-Davidson LiveWire is no exception. We at AMERiders found not one but two blogging sites that did a first ride review of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and we are going to share their thoughts with you of what they thought about it. Now, we have already given you information about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire a few times, including when it was in the planned production stage. So time to get to work on what is thought of the ride now.

Bradley Brownell of Jalopnik and Jason Marker of RideApart both did first Rides of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire. Both of them had good things to say about the motorcycle and I will go into what they each had to say, on each topic. First, you should know that these rides of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire took place in Portland, OR.

The Ride Itself

So we are gonna start off with a short paragraph each of what they both thought of their ride of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire itself with actual quotes from their blogs so we don’t give you misinformation. Harley-Davidson has this to say about the LiveWire when you ride it? “0 TO 60 IN 3 SECONDS — Get instantaneous power the moment you twist the throttle. No clutch to release. No gears to run through. All you do is flick your wrist and take off. ” What did Bradley and Jason have to say about their Harley-Davidson LiveWire Rides?

Bradley Brownell of Jalopnik courtesy Harley-Davidson

Swing a leg over the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and you’ll instantly feel the crashing waves of a sea change. A magnet inside the motor rocks back and forth to indicate the bike is alive, it feels like a faint heartbeat. It’s a little on-the-nose, but it’s as if this bike is directly channeling the pulse of the industry. Is this the future of riding?

Bradley Brownell of Jalopnik

and

Image courtesy of RideApart

LiveWire is a phenomenal motorcycle, but is it the right motorcycle?
And just like that, the LiveWire and I went face-first into the hedge at full throttle. Now, before we get too far into this, there are two things you should know. One, I had just spent over an hour flogging Harley’s new electric wünderbike through some of the loveliest and most technical roads the Greater Portland Metropolitan Area has to offer and was really feeling myself. Two, there’s no neutral on an electric bike. When active, it’s always armed, as it were. My cockiness high spirits, combined with the LiveWire’s always-on status was a recipe for disaster. Or hilarity. Either one.

Jason Marker of RideApart

They give us a short on how it performs but it sounds like they both wonder if the Harley-Davidson LiveWire is going to be the next bike of the future. Let’s move forward, and see how their ride went and were Harley-Davidson took them on their first ride with the Harley-Davidson LiveWire.

The Ride

What did they both think of their ride well lets find out?

I’ll admit to a slight nervousness when I first climbed aboard the good ship LiveWire. I’d heard horror stories about electric torque catching people off guard and ripping the rear wheel out from under its rider, or aggressive throttle wrist leading to an unintentional wheelie dumping rider off the back. I went the first few blocks with a bit of trepidation, but rapidly adjusted to this new sensation. “Damn,” I thought to myself, “this thing is easy street.”

You wouldn’t think of a 100+ horsepower streetfighter-style sport bike as being docile and friendly. It’s just one way that this bike shirks the norms. With a smooth and fluid delivery, the EV powertrain is a gem that proves its worth immediately. Click the ignition switch to on, retract the sidestand, and you’re ready to roll. There’s absolutely no drama.
When coming to a stop at the first traffic light a block down the road, I find myself dipping a toe at an imaginary shifter and reaching for an absent clutch lever. On the mean streets of distracted drivers and occasionally hellacious traffic, it’s refreshing to know you’re never in the wrong gear. Rear brake. Front brake. Throttle. That’s all you have to worry about. Which is great, because Harley thinks it’s likely that many LiveWire miles will be lived in cities.

It doesn’t take long to notice the sounds surrounding me. Stopped at a traffic light I can hear the conversations of pedestrians over on the sidewalk, and the bass hit of the music playing in the car next to me. We’re riding in a pack with four traditional Harleys—a lead rider on a big bagger and a trio of sweep riders on Sportsters at the back—and their staccato V-twin thumping is comparatively imprudent.

Once out on the back country roads, separated from the ICE bikes a bit, I notice more bird calls. And my own thoughts. I don’t like to be alone with those too long.
The LiveWire isn’t silent. It’s actually got quite a dynamic range of sounds. The most prominent sound is that of the drivetrain’s single spiral bevel gear whine. It’s still eerily quiet, however. Quiet enough that you can hear the belt drive, the tires, the brakes, even the shocks.

I asked a Harley engineer about the 90-degree bevel gear and belt-drive setup employed, and why it was preferable to a simple shaft-drive. The bevel gear was chosen to give the bike that Formula E sound, despite a slight parasitic drain. The belt drive is simply because it’s a Harley staple, having been equipped on the company’s bikes since the ‘80s. And why is the motor longitudinal instead of transverse? To make it an important visual piece of the bike’s design.
I also imagine that if the motor was turned transverse, the bottom of the bike would be much wider. With a longitudinal layout, Harley says the LiveWire’s layover angle is 45 degrees—more than any other HD product—before the foot pegs scrape. I didn’t have a float level on hand to prove that measurement correct, but it felt like plenty of angle to work with.

Point the bike in the direction you want to go and hammer down the throttle, you’re transported through time and space like you just hit a wormhole. It’s not so much the acceleration [with a 0-60 time in the 3-second range] that gets me, it’s the ease with which acceleration happens. There’s no pause to shift, no clutch, no lift, just building speed.

In road or sport modes the regenerative braking is functional, but doesn’t quite replicate the engine braking feel you’re used to on an ICE bike. In “range mode” the brake regen gets more aggro and gets a little bit closer. It’s a new sensation, but if used right, you can hop off the throttle and the bike will whoa perfectly into the corner without pedal or lever.
Ultimately, Harley could have made a recognizable riding experience with an EV drivetrain, but it decided instead to build something in a form factor that doesn’t pay much attention to heritage. It also rides in a decidedly un-Harley way.

Bradley

and

I had just come back from my penultimate photo pass. The route was exhilarating. Turn right out of the staging area, a cozy little joint called the Rock Creek Tavern, on to a long, flat straightaway just over a mile long where you could unwind the LiveWire and get a sense of its power. Then, as quick as you like, get off the throttle, let the regenerative braking haul the bike down to a manageable speed, and ease into the gentle left-hander. Sweep right over the bridge, then hard left to a short uphill straight into the lethal, left-handed, decreasing-radius hairpin where the photographers were camped out. Whip through the hairpin as fast as you can to look your best for the cameras (while trying to ignore them), throttle out, scream up the hill and into one more gentle right-hander, then pull over at the dirt road to wait for the next pass to do it all over again backward. Lather, rinse, repeat.

This thing sounds like a speederbike. It’s awesome.
As I pulled back into the tavern’s parking lot after my sixth pass, I felt like Rennie Goddamned Scaysbrook. Each pass I’d made had been faster and better than the last, every line tighter and truer. I was, in the words of Lightning McQueen, speed. You see where this is going, right? I got into the turnaround at Rock Creek at a bad angle—nose down a little hill and pointed at a hedge separating the parking lot from the property next door. So, like I would with any other bike, I pulled back on the bars to yank the bike’s front end up the hill for a little turnaround. You know, the electric bike, the one with no clutch lever and no neutral. As I pulled back I apparently grabbed a fistful of throttle (apparently, because things get blurry for a few seconds here) and the LiveWire leaped forward like a stung horse.

We probably reached 30 miles-per-hour in the six feet between where we started and where we hit the hedge. I buried the LiveWire in that hedge up to the foot pegs before I had the presence of mind to lay off the throttle and bail out. I was half on the bike, half stuck in the hedge and, after a moment, the bike listed slowly to port and trapped my right ankle. I was immediately rushed by a dozen Harley techs checking to see if I was okay, reassuring me, and tending to the bike—which seemed more freaked out than I was, if the numerous warnings and buzzings and flashing lights on the TFT were any indication. Pride definitely wenteth before the fall. So, yeah. That’s my story of how I crashed a LiveWire into a hedge in front of God and everyone else during a press ride.

Jason

Sounds like they had fun Yeah? Well, both Bradley and Jason also let us know that Harley is taking the Harley-Davidson LiveWire seriously and what they thought of the LiveWire and the future of Harley because of it. As well as some tidbits that CEO Matt Levatich had to say about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire.

Future of Harley-Davidson and their thoughts

The LiveWire is aluminum where the traditional Harleys are iron. It’s a philosophical change from the norm, and hopefully indicative that Harley is taking this bike seriously.
Harley-Davidson CEO Matthew Levatich was keen to harp on the theme that “We build riders” which appears to be a signal that the company is shifting its focus to a younger generation of riders.
As the global population trends toward urban living, Levatich says he wants to focus on meeting the needs of that demo. And electrification is apparently one of the ways to do that.

Harley bills the LiveWire as a halo electric product, and that many more EV models are coming, priced from $1,000 on up to the LiveWire’s $29,799. This bike, and the others on the way, are the backbone of its electric strategy. Levatich continued, “We aim to lead in the electrification of the sport.”
It’s astonishing to me that it wasn’t Honda or BMW that pushed mainstream motorcycle manufacturers into the electric sphere, but good ‘ol Americana Harley-Davidson that took that leap. 

Whether it’s by necessity or by choice doesn’t really matter. If Harley clearly and consistently pushes forward with this strategy and it pays off—if it becomes more than just an expensive halo bike for early adopters—this gamble has the potential to be a product shift on the level of Iaccoca-era Chrysler. Harley has had quality products and failed to deliver before, but I genuinely hope this one succeeds.

My dad, who has had a Heritage Softail for over a decade and recently bought a Tri Glide Ultra, is the guy you see in your mind when you think Harley buyer. His response to the LiveWire? “Wow! I bet that is quick! I need to try one out.”
My barber, the tattooed punk rocker type of vintage Harley rider had a very different response. “Pass. Harley has gotten way off course with their new models. Trying to appeal to the younger generation that are not buying motorcycles at all. Stick with what you know, HD.”
So it might be a mixed bag.

Bradley

and

The LiveWire’s technological innovation doesn’t end at its ability to stop and corner, however. If the Revelation motor is LiveWire’s heart, the powerful, adaptable Reflex Defensive Riding System is its brain. The RDRS is an onboard computer and electronics suite that controls the bike’s high-tech systems and provides numerous rider aids and riding modes to fit any taste or style. It includes a cornering enhanced ABS system, cornering enhanced traction control system, rear wheel lift mitigation, and drag-torque slip control system. That’s a lot of technobabble for what is, essentially, a bunch of sensors and a six-axis inertial measuring unit that help the rider keep the wheels firmly planted on nearly any kind of surface.
All of the bike’s techno-wizardry is controlled through a trick 4.3-inch, full-color TFT display that makes up its gauge cluster and infotainment control system. It’s equipped with an ambient light sensor that adjusts both brightness and contrast (I never had trouble reading the TFT through my polarized visor no matter how bright it was outside) and displays the clock, speed, and idiot lights. It can also cycle through various functions and displays like range, voltage, odometers, etc. As befits a thoroughly modern motorcycle, the TFT is Bluetooth enabled and can sync to iOS or Android devices. The rider can sync up, toss their phone in a pocket, and control everything via the bike’s touch screen. That includes things like displaying turn-by-turn navigation and controlling music and phone calls. Pretty nifty. Sadly, none of the test bikes were set up to actually do this, so I didn’t have a chance to try it out. Hopefully next time.

Of course, since we live in a dystopian, app-driven, subscription-based Cyberpunk hellscape now, the LiveWire is fully cloud-connected and can be controlled and communicated with via the Harley-Davidson App. Called H-D Connect (natch), the app allows a LiveWire owner to connect to their bike and do things like check its settings, charging status, security, etc. Owners can set up push notifications so that the bike alerts them of the current status of the battery, if anyone is dicking around with the bike when they shouldn’t be, and all sorts of things. It’s like a Tesla up in there, seriously. Do we need all this? Maybe. Harley sure thinks we do. I just worry that it’s a bit… much.

Yeah, Well… How Is It?
In a word, the LiveWire rules. It’s a towering technological achievement on Harley’s part, a powerful, aggressive, sporty, comfortable, incredibly fast, and agile electric bike that showcases what can be done with essentially infinite money and a six-year development time. Despite the one little hedge-related hiccup, my time with the LiveWire was amazing. It did everything I asked of it. It attacked every corner eagerly and effortlessly, and the various electronic systems allowed me to push the bike right to the edge of my riding abilities—if not its own prodigious capabilities—without anxiety. I felt like I could count on the bike, like it was there for me. It let me wind it out and never punished me for it.

At speed, LiveWire is a goddamned freight train. It just pulls and pulls and never seems to run out of steam. Roll the throttle on at any speed and the Revelation spools up instantly to rocket you into or out of any situation. Acceleration is like a kick in the ass, and more than once I felt like I was just hanging on while the bike drove instead of actively piloting it myself.
The ergos are fantastic, too. The bike has an aggressive, slightly forward, naked bike seating position with mild rearsets and flat bars. The saddle was surprisingly comfortable for how small it looks, and with the low, low center of gravity, it was flickable at speed and nimble in tight confines. I would have liked the TFT better had it been mounted a little higher, but that’s just me. Also, since the bike doesn’t vibrate or generate tons of wasted heat, LiveWire is super comfortable for the long haul and doesn’t beat you up like other bikes. I was tired at the end of my ride, but a contented tired like from a hard workout. Not a deep, exhausted tired you’d get from, say, wrestling with a hot, loud, vibrating big-twin all day.

As for fit and finish? Well, that’s only mostly great. Everything not part of the handlebar is pretty great. The paint is deep and rich, the surfaces feel good to the touch, and everything fits together seemingly perfectly. The LiveWire wasn’t slapped together at 4:55pm on a Friday and it shows. My biggest gripe is with the switchgear, levers, and mirrors. The switches and binnacles are bog-standard Harley parts bin bits with add-on buttons for the new LiveWire-specific systems. Their layout sucks and is completely counter-intuitive. I eventually just stopped using everything but the turn signals (and even then I had to keep looking for them) because nothing was where it should have been. In addition to the parts bin switches, the mirrors and levers are standard H-D fare, too. Seriously, Harley? Seriously? You’re gonna put the same handlebar controls on your 30K, high-po, hot rod halo bike as the ones I can get on a Sportster? Or on a Street 500? That’s some seriously bad form right there.

Overall, I was deeply impressed with the LiveWire. I did a whole lot of whooping and demented cackling in my helmet as I thrashed it around the twisties outside of Portland. That’s about as good a recommendation as I’ll give any bike. LiveWire is fun. Fun and cool in a way that, in my opinion, many of the Motor Company’s products are not. Is that enough, though?

Jason

So what are the specs of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire? Let’s give you a few bits of what our bloggers said on the specs shall we and what Harley said themselves.

Charging

Charge at home, or use a Level 3 DC Fast Charge station to power up. Harley-Davidson photo.

So what does Harley have to say about their Livewire and it’s Charging?

TWO EASY WAYS TO CHARGE
Use the onboard Level 1 charger and power cord to connect to any standard household outlet and get a full charge overnight. For a faster charge, visit any public DC Fast Charge station for 80% charge in 40 minutes or 100% charge in an hour.

Harley-Davidson

Bradley had a bit to say about the charging let’s see what it was.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire

The battery, or renewable energy storage system in HD parlance, has an impressive 15.5kWh worth of lithium ions onboard. That battery is good for 146 miles in the city, 70 miles on the highway, and 95-ish mixed. You might be able to stretch those numbers if you’re aggressive on the regen.
Then again, if you are hard on acceleration you could suck it dry of electrons in far less. Frequent 0-100 launches? Yeah, that’ll run things down.

LiveWire owners will have their options open when it comes to charging. Harley says most owners will probably treat their bike like a smart phone, plugging it in every night to recharge before using it as an urban/suburban commuter ride. For the ones who want to ride farther and longer, the LiveWire joins Energica in offering DC Fast Charge. You can shove one of those bad boys into the top tank and it’ll fill from zero to 80 percent charge in 40 minutes, and up to 100 percent in one hour, according to Harley. 

Every one of the 150 “Phase One” Harley-Davidson dealerships to get the LiveWire had to install at least one DC Fast Charge station, send at least one of its master certified mechanics for LiveWire-specific maintenance training, and prep its salespeople to answer EV specific questions. As part of this package, LiveWire buyers will be entitled to free charges at all HD dealerships for the first two years.

In addition to the dealer network, Harley has tapped a partnership with Electrify America’s network of fast charge stations. Each LiveWire owner will get free charging up to 500 kilowatt-hours for the first two years of ownership. That equates to about 40 free charges from Electrify America. If you plan your trips right, you’re paying nothing to ride the thing for the first two years.

Bradley

Their last thoughts

What did they like and dislike about the bike?

Likes

Harley-Davidson LiveWire

I truly find this to be a stylish bike. I like the air-cooling fins on the battery, drawing a visual connection between Harleys of old and the company’s EV-inclusive future. The motor slung below the bike is another cool piece of the design, being the only piece in silver makes it an eye catching style point.

The 4.3-inch color TFT touch screen is quite nice to look at. The numbers are crisp and clear, the whole unit is legible and easy to read, and the touch activation works decently even with a gloved hand. Unlike some other bikes I’ve been on, the touch screen is only active when the bike is stationary, but the operation toggles on the right handlebar are perhaps even easier to operate than the touch screen anyway.

You can sync up your cell phone with your bike to control things like music and turn-by-turn directions. The latter of which can be displayed on the screen with a direction arrow, upcoming street name, and distance to turn. Live maps are not compatible with this screen, which is kind of a shame, but it might be too small a screen to accommodate something like that.

The different power delivery modes are fun to play with. If you want to maximize range, you can optimize the bike for maximum regeneration and light acceleration. If you get to a fun road, you can pump both up and hammer down. Figuring out which balance you like best can really help you get the most out of the bike. With built-in Sport Mode, Road Mode, Rain Mode, and Range Mode, you can let the factory figure it out for you, or you can configure three custom modes.

The advanced computers in the LiveWire are above and beyond what you’d expect from the Harley brand. Outside of the different modes, there’s a quite sophisticated traction control and anti-lock braking system with anti-wheelie as well as anti-stoppie. The ABS system has also been pumped up to include information about lean angle when taking brake forces into consideration to keep you upright. There is also a specific system to prevent the regenerative braking from locking up the wheel on wet roads. It’s all seamless, and makes for an engaging ride safer than average.

Bradly

In a word, the LiveWire rules. It’s a towering technological achievement on Harley’s part, a powerful, aggressive, sporty, comfortable, incredibly fast, and agile electric bike that showcases what can be done with essentially infinite money and a six-year development time. Despite the one little hedge-related hiccup, my time with the LiveWire was amazing. It did everything I asked of it. It attacked every corner eagerly and effortlessly, and the various electronic systems allowed me to push the bike right to the edge of my riding abilities—if not its own prodigious capabilities—without anxiety. I felt like I could count on the bike, like it was there for me. It let me wind it out and never punished me for it.

At speed, LiveWire is a goddamned freight train. It just pulls and pulls and never seems to run out of steam. Roll the throttle on at any speed and the Revelation spools up instantly to rocket you into or out of any situation. Acceleration is like a kick in the ass, and more than once I felt like I was just hanging on while the bike drove instead of actively piloting it myself.

The ergos are fantastic, too. The bike has an aggressive, slightly forward, naked bike seating position with mild rearsets and flat bars. The saddle was surprisingly comfortable for how small it looks, and with the low, low center of gravity, it was flickable at speed and nimble in tight confines. I would have liked the TFT better had it been mounted a little higher, but that’s just me. Also, since the bike doesn’t vibrate or generate tons of wasted heat, LiveWire is super comfortable for the long haul and doesn’t beat you up like other bikes. I was tired at the end of my ride, but a contented tired like from a hard workout. Not a deep, exhausted tired you’d get from, say, wrestling with a hot, loud, vibrating big-twin all day.

As for fit and finish? Well, that’s only mostly great. Everything not part of the handlebar is pretty great. The paint is deep and rich, the surfaces feel good to the touch, and everything fits together seemingly perfectly. The LiveWire wasn’t slapped together at 4:55pm on a Friday and it shows. My biggest gripe is with the switchgear, levers, and mirrors. The switches and binnacles are bog-standard Harley parts bin bits with add-on buttons for the new LiveWire-specific systems. Their layout sucks and is completely counter-intuitive. I eventually just stopped using everything but the turn signals (and even then I had to keep looking for them) because nothing was where it should have been. In addition to the parts bin switches, the mirrors and levers are standard H-D fare, too. Seriously, Harley? Seriously? You’re gonna put the same handlebar controls on your 30K, high-po, hot rod halo bike as the ones I can get on a Sportster? Or on a Street 500? That’s some seriously bad form right there.

Overall, I was deeply impressed with the LiveWire. I did a whole lot of whooping and demented cackling in my helmet as I thrashed it around the twisties outside of Portland. That’s about as good a recommendation as I’ll give any bike. LiveWire is fun. Fun and cool in a way that, in my opinion, many of the Motor Company’s products are not. Is that enough, though?

Jason

Dislikes

Friends, I have some seriously mixed feelings about the LiveWire. It’s not the bike itself that’s the problem, though. Like I said earlier, it’s a fantastic achievement and everyone involved with the project should be proud. It’s just… I don’t know. Who the hell is this bike for? During the pre-ride presentation, the presenters told us a whole lot about the marketing and target audience without actually saying anything. Harley claims the LiveWire’s target demographic is “Youngish, wealthy, urban early-adopters who enjoy being on the cutting edge with a highly developed personal style and a desire to be associated with luxury and/or premium brands”. That’s a paraphrase, but you get the gist of it.
I’m going to write a longer opinion piece soon about this whole target demographic situation, but suffice to say that now I’m not sure LiveWire has an audience and I’m not sure it’ll find one. I want the LiveWire to succeed because it deserves it and so does its development team. Will Harley let it succeed is my question. Will the company give the bike the support it needs (and will it give the select dealers who will carry LiveWire the training that they will need to sell it), or will this be a Buell and/or VROD situation all over again? Time will tell, I guess. Until then, let’s wish Harley and LiveWire all the luck in the world, because both are going to need it.

Jason

Outside of the price (more on that later), there is very little to dislike about this EV rider. I really had to grasp at straws to find this short list.
The rear view mirrors are useless for practical purposes. I’m what some would call a big guy, with my suit jackets measured at 54″ at the shoulder, so it’s likely that this has a lot to do with my rearward visibility. Luckily, this can be changed pretty easily with a set of aftermarket mirrors. I’d go for a stylish set of bar-end mirrors and never worry about it again.

While common with sport bikes, it’s worth noting that there is nary a storage space to be found on this bike. You can lift up the seat to reveal a fitted space for your wall charger to slot in, so if you choose not to carry the charger, you can probably fit a few small items in there. It’s not much.

And this problem is exacerbated by the fact that the colored cover on top of the bike, where a fuel tank would be, is made of molded plastic. In the past when I’ve needed to go on a ride while carrying anything, I’ll throw a magnetic tank bag in that space. This is minor from a convenience standpoint, as you can always throw on a backpack, and Harley says it offers plenty of aftermarket storage options that will fit the LiveWire. From a quality standpoint, however, this is the only part of the bike that feels cheaper than it would on a comparable ICE motorcycle.

And the final point I found annoying was an ergonomic issue. While the bike is quite comfortable in riding position, there is a boss around the bolt that holds the battery unit to the frame right about where my legs want to be while stopped at a light or in traffic. It doesn’t seem like it would be a big deal, but after a couple hours of riding, I developed a light bruise on the inside of my thigh just above the knee. Again, I’m bigger than the average rider, but I’m also 6’2″ with a 32″ inseam and think that this would be worse for people any shorter than me.
Value
There is a life cycle for adoption of a new technology which includes a large chasm between early adopters and the majority. The LiveWire feels like it has the potential to bridge that gap and introduce the technology to the mainstream. As electric charging becomes more ubiquitous consumers will adapt to the idea.

The near-$30,000 price tag is going to turn a lot of buyers off. That’s a fact. But there are some who will value the bike as a novelty, a conversation piece, and a historically significant technological touchpoint. In the same way that driving an interesting car has value, so does this bike. Most riders buy a bike because it makes a statement about who they are, it’s an emotional purchase usually devoid of logic.

In that way, if the LiveWire says you’re interesting, environmentally conscious, and maybe a smidge more counterculture than a Tesla owner, maybe you find it valuable.
Beyond just being a thing that people would be interested in seeing at a cars and coffee or at your local bike night, it functions quite well as a motorcycle. This is a quick, fun to ride, competent two wheeler with enough tech baked in to help keep you rubber side down.

And then there are the perks. When you include the unlimited mileage warranty, connectivity package, and years of free charging, it starts to approach feasible. And when you consider most buyers are going to finance or lease something like this anyway, the monthly nut looks easier to crack.

Harley says all current financing offers apply on the LiveWire, so their current 4.49 percent APR for 60 months and $0 down option would get you riding for about $500 a month.
I’m not suggesting this is the right method for you, but I could definitely see the Tesla-buying doctor, lawyer, dentist getting one of these to ship to Daytona, Sturgis, or Reno for a once-a-year two-wheel tryst.

Are supercars overpriced? Are MacBooks overpriced? In the case of the LiveWire, I’d argue that you’re paying for a brand name with at least some prestige, a bike that is packed with quality engineering, and style that will snap necks.
Is it for everyone? Not a chance. But maybe that’s why it’s good.

Bradley

So what do we know and think?

Both bloggers are a bit mixed on the Harley-Davidson LiveWire but it is ultimately going to be the public that decides the fate of the motorcycle itself. It sounds like the Harley-Davidson LiveWire is going to be a fun motorcycle to take a test ride of to me. I do agree with that price 30k is a bit much for a bike. Well, now you know a bit more about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire. What do you think about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and would you buy it just on this information alone?

If you were to buy one though whats safety gear would you wear with it? Have you thought if you need new gear lately?

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Mistakes

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Harley-Davidson LiveWire.

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