Memorial Day Events, Rallies and Rides Being Held This Week

AMERiders knows that Memorial Day is a time to honor members of the military who have fallen in during service to the United States. Both Men and women throughout history have died on battlefields, making the ultimate sacrifice during combat operations in support of the mission, their allies, and their brothers and sisters in arms. Memorial Day is one of the biggest holidays on the calendars of motorcycle riders. From Poker Runs, Rallies to Rides These are some of the larger Memorial Day Events, Rallies and Rides Being Held This Week in the United States:

Rolling Thunder Ride for Freedom XXX

Memorial Day Events

Date/Time
Date(s) – 05/25/2018 – 05/28/2018
12:00 am

Location
Address: Washington 22046

http://www.rollingthunder1.com/

FACT SHEET
Incorporated in 1995, Rolling ThunderÒ, Inc. is a class 501(c) (4) non-profit organization with over 90 chartered chapters throughout the United States and members abroad. While many members of Rolling Thunder®, Inc. are veterans and many ride motorcycles, neither qualification is a prerequisite. Rolling Thunder®, Inc. members are old and young, men and women, veterans and non-veterans. All are united in the cause to bring full accountability for the Prisoners Of War-Missing In Action (POW/MIA) of all wars, reminding the government, the media and the public by our watchwords: “We Will Not Forget.”

River’s Edge Memorial Day Weekend Mega Biker Bash

Memorial Day Events

Saturday, May 26 – Monday, May 28

Date/Time
Date(s) – 05/26/2018 – 05/28/2018
12:00 am

Location
River’s Edge Bar and Grill

Featuring:

  • Bobby Friss (Sat & Sun)
  • Hollywood Knockouts (Sat & Sun)
  • Born To Ride Bike Show (Sat)
  • Born To Ride TV taping and magazine shoot (Sat)
  • Tommy Roxx (Mon)
  • Food & drink specials
  • riversEdgeBarAndGrill.com
Veterans Honor Ride

Memorial Day EventsDate/Time
Date(s) – 05/26/2018
8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Coffee, Beverages, and Doughnuts starting at 8:00 am

Kickstands up at 9:30 am

Location
Stu’s Motorcycles Indian/Triumph Dealership 14607 Ben C Pratt Pkwy, Fort Myers, 33912

RIDE TO HONOR A VETERAN!  Join Stu’s Motorcycles and Collier-Lee Honor Flight to provide our Veterans from Collier and Lee County with an Honor Flight to Washington DC.  Help allow our veterans the opportunity to view and reflect at the memorials which were built to recognize their service and sacrifices.

Route: 112-mile ride will end at Ragged Ass Saloon, St James City,

Pine Island for Lunch

Donation:    $25 per bike, $10 per additional rider.

All proceeds will be used to support Collier-Lee Honor Flight 501C3 missions to Washington DC.

To sign up for the ride go to www.stusmotorcycles.com

For more information on the honor flight program, go to www.collierhonorflight.org

A History of Heroes

History is filled with examples of the US military defending the American way of life from infringements around the world. Our Heroes stopped the Nazi from dominating much of the world, defended the world from Japan’s fanatical Imperial military as well as resisted the advance of Communist influence. And today, courageous service men and women fight overseas against radical threats.

Memorial Day Events
DOT POW/MIA BEANIE HELMET

Remember also that it is important to keep yourself safe when riding which is why using protective gear is important. Remembering those that are lost in action or that are Prisoners of War is something we all need to do. One way to show our support for the folks in the US Armed Forces, and our POW/MIA servicemen and women is to take wear our DOT POW/MIA BEANIE HELMET.

How Do Bikers remember Memorial Day?

You will find that a lot of bikers take Memorial day very seriously and participate in rides to memorial walls and hold many different types of Memorial day events to help educate, raise money and more for different organizations that are affiliated with Memorial Day. Such as Wreaths across America, Gold Star Mothers, Rolling Thunder (who have a large ride at the Pentagon each year) and many others.

What Do People Do?

Memorial Day EventsIt is traditional to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff from dawn until noon. Many people visit cemeteries and memorials, particularly to honor those who have died in military service. Many volunteers place an American flag on each grave in national cemeteries.

Now it has become less of an occasion of remembrance. Many people choose to hold picnics, sports events and family gatherings on this weekend. This day is traditionally seen as the start of the summer season for cultural events. For the fashion conscious, it is seen as acceptable to wear white clothing, particularly shoes from Memorial Day until Labor Day. However, fewer and fewer people follow this rule and many wear white clothing throughout the year. While there are towns and cities that still hold Memorial Day parades, many have not held a parade in decades.

We at AMERiders always Honor Our Vets, so if you need a new helmet, do-rag, chaps, vest, gloves we at AMERiders have you covered and if you need something for your bike like saddle bags, tool bags, windshield bags, sissybar bags, cup holders, cell phone holders, get back whips and the list goes on we have you covered there also.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Memorial Day Events

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up with Memorial Day Events, Rallies and Rides Being Held This Week.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

When in doubt as an expert…like a Motorcycle Thief

When in doubt, ask an expert

On the net, you can find places that have different Ask Me Anythings. We found one that had an idea about soliciting a Motorcycle Thief about how to keep your bike from being stolen. First answered by a cop in London and by later an actual bike thief from the United States, the results are positively illuminating. So here, on AMERiders we’ve edited the material into something more readable, linear and easily digestible. It’s a must-read if you don’t want your bike to get stolen.

The original Ask Me Anything request reads:
  • what type of motorcycles did you target and why?
  • what’s the best type of security system we can get for our motorcycles?
  • how and where should we position chain locks on our bikes so you don’t take bolt cutters to them? how easy is it to cut high-quality locks?
  • what deters you the most? as in when you see a motorcycle and analyze it for a steal,
  • what makes you go “no, not that one.”
  • what does a gallon of bleach taste like after you swallow it?
Let’s look at the responses from the cop first:

“The thing is security costs money. It’s not a 100% guarantee but it gives your bike a fighting chance.”

Types of motorcycles:

“The most popular bikes for thievery are sports bikes and those bikes which you see around more commonly. Reason being in an age of trackers, HPI checks and people knowing much more about how to be smart when they buy a new vehicle (so as not to buy a stolen one) it’s much simpler for the thief to break the bike up into parts and sell it for parts. In fact only a few weeks ago we raided a house and found 5 motorcycles in various stages of being stripped down.”

Best security:

“The most common way of stealing a motorcycle is by lifting it off of the ground and loading into a van. Quick, easy, quiet, once the bike is in the van it’s invisible, riding it comes with a greater risk of being caught. Plus you don’t even need to know how to ride it. No need to override the ignition. It couldn’t be simpler. We’ve seen them in the past put a scaffold tube under the front forks and under the back of the bike near the shock and lift it between 4 of them. Even a big sports bike at 200kg is only 50 kg each.”

“For this reason, your first priority must be to stop it getting off the ground. Only a good chain, lock and ground anchor will stop this. Ideally, you need something which is hardened and 16mm diameter plus. Otherwise, they may well be able to cut it with bolt cutters. Which for them is ideal because it’s quick and very quiet. A good lock is one which is hard to pick and very hard wearing. We don’t see many picking attacks at all, in fact, I don’t think I ever have but for peace of mind I use an Abloy on my bike.”

“A decent ground anchor should be very solid indeed. The ones which you sink into concrete are best but not realistic for most people unless you’re putting concrete down anyway. A strong bolt down is mostly very efficient. Some are better than others. I’ve got a Hardie ground anchor because you can lift a lorry cab up with it and it won’t break. Another great thing, disc lock alarms. I’ve got two, one on each wheel. If the bike starts moving they go off and make a right ruckus, just what the thieves hate. Also, things like alphadot, smartwater, with visible stickers are deterrents too.”

“Ideally garage your bike. If it is on a driveway then get one of those PIR security lights. The thieves do not want a “and by the light let your good work shine” type scenario. A dummy CCTV camera is good to because a lot of thieves will be put off even if they think its a fake.”

How to lock up:

“Ideally not through a wheel. A wheel is easy to remove. It’s great having a really secure wheel but like I say a lot of the time they get sold as spares so through the frame is great. You can’t do that with my bike so I’ve put it through the gap between the engine block and the downpipes then through the front forks which is either going to be quite time-consuming (likely set the disc lock alarms off) or very noisy. Lock the chain off tight. What I mean by that is it shouldn’t have much slack between the bike and floor at all. You may have to make a cut in the chain sleeve in order to be able to do this. But its really worth it. If the chain is loose on the floor its much more vulnerable to sledgehammer attacks, freeze attacks, wedge attacks and bolt cutters.”

How to deter a thief:

“The biggest deterrent is a secure motorcycle. Reason being there are a lot of insecure ones out there and they will go for the low hanging fruit every time.”

“Remember what a thief doesn’t want is to be caught. Being caught is the biggest hazard in their line of business. Business is how most of them see it. Make your bike riskier than other bikes and they’ll go for easier pickings. Reminds me a while ago I was on foot patrol and saw a lovely Ducati 916 with a chain through the back wheel, not attached to anything. I did give the owner some advice and it was heartening to see that he did take it on board. Ultimately your goal should be making getting caught in the act as likely as possible and the maximize the time it would take to steal the bike.”

“The point is, the more trouble the thief has to go to the longer it’s going to take. The vast majority of thieves got for the low hanging fruit. This is about not making your bike the low hanging fruit.”

And here’s what the thief has to say:

“I’m not exactly sure how I ended up with this life. I was basically a normal American kid who was very shy and did well in school. My best friend was basically a dirtbag and he made it seem cool to be a dirtbag. I started off dropping him off at bikes to steal, then scouting out bikes for him to steal, then helping him steal bikes, then stealing them together.”

“I figured out quickly that the guys we sold the bikes to made more money and assumed far less risk so I saved my money so I could get on that end of things.”

“I considered myself small time but I was involved in the scene for over 10 years. While my name was brought up in investigations I was never charged with a crime related to this business and I never “informed” on anyone. I quit when I felt the risk exceeded the reward. Maybe it was the guilt, the shame, maybe I was just finally growing up. I lived a lie for a long time and even if no one knew it I was painfully embarrassed inside because of the life I had been leading. I love motorcycles and I was the man responsible for that sickening feeling you have when you wake up to realize your baby has been stolen and I was responsible for it A LOT. Towards the end, I would sleep in sweatpants and a hoodie because I knew any day my door was going to be kicked in and I wanted to be comfortable as possible in jail.”

“I’ve been out of it all for 4-5 years and I still am trying to figure out how I became that guy.”

Types of motorcycles:

“Mostly supersports. They are the most commonly crashed and generally the easiest to find (left outside in nice apartment complexes) Next would be Harleys and for a brief moment in time the high dollar choppers.”

Best security:

“Never, ever, never never never, NEVER leave your bike outside at an apartment complex. Especially one with a gated parking garage. The gated parking garage in a mid to high rise apartment building in the nice part of a large city is the number one place for bike thieves to go ‘shopping.’”

“As far as passive devices go I like the NYC fughetaboutit chain/lock from Kryptonite, the thicker of the two. It needs to go through something like a braced swingarm whenever possible. If you absolutely have to put it through a wheel put it through the rear wheel. It takes much longer to swap than the front wheel. Any $100 disc lock will work well, again, rear wheel, locks on the front are more easily defeated, take my word for it. Cheaper disc locks can be quietly, well, we’ll leave it at that, cheap ones can be defeated in silence.”

“Lo-jack and Lo-Jack w/early warning are pretty good at recovering the bikes from amateurs and semi-pros, but someone who knows what they are doing will remove the LoJack system quickly after clearing the area. Still, someone even more professional (surprisingly rare) will have somewhere to check/store/breakdown the bike that is rf shielded. The problem with lo-jack is that it doesn’t keep someone from stealing the bike. Even if you get it back in one piece without the police crashing into your bike to catch the thief you’ll still likely have a broken upper triple, damage to the neck of your frame (Steering lock), damage to your ignition, damage to the tank lock, possible damage to the tank itself (rare-ish) possible damage to the trunk lock , and then your insurance company might fuck you too. It’s much better to not get the bike stolen in the first place. So in addition to LoJack, you want some sort of VISIBLE passive devices to make the thief move on. The paging alarms are somewhat effective, but they aren’t linked to the police. Removing electronic devices is obviously more of a mental challenge than a physical one. The quality of the install is a huge factor here. Hide the lo-jack or alarm in or under the airbox and all the wiring within the factory looms and you’ll have a good set up. However, almost NO dealer tech is this through. It’s not his bike, why would he go the extra mile?”

Best locks:

“Of the dozens of [thieves] I knew over the years I only came across one like this, but I knew someone that had a pair of bolt-cutters that weighed a lot, more than a 45lb plate at the gym, and had replaceable cryogenically hardened teeth. They cost several hundred dollars. The high dollar chain lock sets $150+ are worth it. Even the high dollar braided cable locks are good. They can be cut, but it’s a pretty time-consuming process.”

What makes you pass over a bike?

“Personally, if it’s rashed up, looks cosmetically rough, but mechanically sound. Say grips are worn, been dropped on both sides, but the chain is clean and well-adjusted, tires worn hard on the edges, has any signs of safety-wiring for the track etc. Its lack of value isn’t what I’m looking it. It would remind me of myself once upon a time. I think that’s probably all he’s got, his whole world, it’s not pretty, but he rides the piss out of it. He gets a pass.”

“More for most people, just what takes time. I’ve known very very few stone-cold guys that can sit there for an hour working on a bike. Most people will give it a few seconds, maybe a couple minutes, and if they can’t get it they are gone. What are only seconds feels like an eternity when your freedom and life are on the line. Quality disc lock on the rear wheel, quality chain, and lock, lockable bike cover, and theft coverage on your insurance. For me, lo-jack isn’t worth the cost. It’s more expensive than theft coverage and after a thief has had his way with the bike I don’t want it back. All can fit in a backpack and aren’t much of a hassle to carry. Never leave it outside very long day or night.”

Security tips:

“If you’re temporarily parked outside somewhere a good little FREE anti-theft trick, bring a stubby flathead with you and remove your clutch lever. No clutch lever and they aren’t riding anywhere. Of course, if you do this every night outside your apartment they’ll just come back with their own clutch lever.”

“LOCK YOUR F**KING STEERING – DON’T LEAVE YOUR SPARE KEY IN YOUR TRUNK. I can open your trunk with a butter knife, don’t leave me your fucking key in there, Jesus. Happens more often than you think. Also, don’t leave your TITLE in the trunk, I’ve seen this too often too. Steering locks aren’t that hard to bypass, but they aren’t THAT easy either. Sometimes you get the freak one that doesn’t want to break and you’ll need to come back with a second person. In that time maybe the owner sees the bike and the thief doesn’t get it. Had it been unlocked the bike would be gone.”

“Again, if you park outside of an apartment and your bike gets stolen, rent a fucking garage or self-storage unit nearby to use as a garage. The thief is just going to wait a couple weeks for insurance to replace your bike and come back to check. If someone tries and fails to get your bike the same thing applies. Move it, they WILL be back.”

How much do you earn per bike?

“It varies depending on yr/make/model/condition. About 10-12 years ago there was an out of state buyer we used to create bikes to that had the ability to create titles for them who paid $3500 for near new 1000cc supersports. 1,000-1,500 is more typical for super sports. Harleys vary quite a bit depending on model and options, from 1,000 for a basic late model Sportster to several thousand for a highly optioned fat boy, road king etc.”

Ride ‘em or van ‘em?

“There is this common misconception that a few guys load bikes into trucks and vans. The people who get CAUGHT load bikes into trucks and vans. Your career will be very short if you’re loading a 185mph rocket (that likely has a tracking system) that will outrun the police into the back of an 85mph van that will take you to the scene of your arrest. If you can’t start the bike and ride off then you damn sure can’t find and remove LoJack.”

“In 10-15 years I’ve known a couple dozen thieves and only one that was foolish enough to load bikes into a truck or van for any length of time. He learned to wire them after he was caught, twice, lol.”

“I was taught to never ride a hot bike anywhere you didn’t absolutely have to and to ride strictly by the letter of the law. You don’t get it if you don’t have somewhere to take it, you don’t ride like a jackass and risk your money/freedom, it’s not a bike, it’s a job, and it’s payday. Generally, you got the bike, rode it straight to your destination, and broke it down.”

A final word:

“The majority of thieves aren’t that smart and half of those are on drugs, please don’t be dumber than they are.”

~And as always….

~Live Free Ride Hard~

thief

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on how to keep a thief from stealing your bike.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Credit for the original story was published on May 4, 2013, by Wes Siler, and the cover photo by Abus Security Tech Germany

Five Female Motorcyclists You May Not Have Heard Of Yet

I apologize that I gave you nothing to read last week I was really out of sorts and was not able to get anything written for you. I will make it up to you this week, however. So without further ado…… From Barry Sheene to Mike Hailwood and Michael Dunlop, every motorcycle (and even non-motorcycle) fan knows these legends and greats. But what about Marjorie Cottle, or the Guinness World Record holder, Maria Costello? While the men of the motorbiking world get a lot of recognition, the same often cannot be said for the women. AMERiders decided that today we were going to give credit where credit is due: here are five of the best female motorcyclists of all time.

Maria Costello

female motorcyclists

In 1995 Maria Costello achieved her first win during her debut season racing at England’s Mallory Park circuit. Since then, she has won phenomenal awards and races, as well as setting a Guinness World Record for being the fastest woman to lap the Isle of Man TT, in 2004. Maria lapped the Snaefell mountain course at an average speed of 114.73 mph. She held the record until the equally bad-ass Jenny Tinmouth broke the record in 2009, and then again in 2010 – the latter attempt with an average speed of 119.45mph.

Maria’s success saw her become one of our first ever female motorcyclists ever to claim a podium on the Isle of Man TT, as well as being the only female motorcycle racer ever to be awarded an MBE, which she received from Prince Charles at Buckingham Palace in 2009.

Patsy Quick

female motorcyclists

Another record-holder, Patsy Quick was the first British woman to compete in the Dakar Rally – renowned for being one of the hardest races in the world. Patsy managed to conquer this demanding rally in 2006. And if that’s not impressive enough, during her 20 years of riding, she has been European Women’s Champion, British Women’s Enduro Champion, and competed in many international rallies, including four Dakar races. Making her one of our many female motorcyclists.

Ana Carrasco Gabarrón

female motorcyclists

An up-and-coming Spanish motorcycle racer, Ana began riding motorcycles at the age of three. Starting so young, it should come as no surprise that she’s already smashing records and making history at the young age of 20. Recently Ana secured victory at the Prosecco DOC Portuguese Round, held 17 September 2017, making her the first female to have won a World Championship motorbike race (solo class).

Beyond this, she has also achieved a number of other racing accolades, including being the first female rider to score points in the Moto3 World Championship at the 2013 Malaysian Grand Prix, as well as being the first female rider to score points in any class since 2001. Needless to say, the racing world is pretty excited to see what Ana will do as she continues to mature. Making her another one of our many female motorcyclists.

Jane Daniels

Another young firecracker, and one that is famous for being the No. 1 female endurance rider in the United Kingdom, 23-year-old Jane Daniels secured second place in the Women’s Enduro World Cup in 2013, and also managed to beat Laia Sanz, a 13-times Women’s Trial World Champion and 10-times Women’s Trial European Champion, during the final race in France.

However, after a promising start to her career, things were waylaid abruptly when Jane suffered a serious injury to her back, fracturing two vertebrae, during an Enduro-Cross event in November 2014.

“Basically I went over one of the obstacles not quite fast enough, sumped-out on top of it and the momentum of my body sent me over the bars so I landed straight on my head and squashed my vertebra and wedge-fractured two of them, T5 and T6 – the ones between the shoulder blades,” Daniels explained to Rust magazine.

After a long recovery, she has returned to competing in enduro races, as well as experimenting with different forms of racing, such as trials.

Marjorie Cottle

female motorcyclists
One name you definitely should know is that of Marjorie Cottle. Marjorie competed in the International Six Days Trial of 1927, an off-road motorcycling event originally held in the Lake District, winning the International Silver Vase. Marjorie, alongside her team of fearsome female racers – including Edyth Foley and Louise MacLean – competed against 100 competitors in the event. Even before 1927 she was one of Britain’s best known female motorcyclists.

Largely that fame had come as the result of a 3,000-mile endurance ride she undertook in 1924, travelling the whole of Britain’s coastline on a 2.75hp Raleigh motorcycle (keep in mind that British roads left a lot to be desired at the time, to the extent the national speed limit was set at just 20 mph).

With inspirational riders like Marjorie Cottle paving the way for record smashers like Maria Costello, Ana Carrasco Gabarrón, and Jane Daniels, the future is truly bright for the competing female motorcyclist community.

Thanks to the strong and successful female figures of the motorcycling world, the industry is becoming a more accessible place for women. In fact, the number of US female motorcycle owners has doubled from 2003 to 2014 and there are more female riders than ever, according to the Motorcycle Industry Council. Thanks to the growing popularity of female-only biker clubs and the increase in women owning, buying and insuring motorbikes, it’s clear that the female motorcycling community as a whole is expanding and thriving.

~And as always….

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Memorial Day

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on female motorcyclists.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

The Top Ten Motorcycle Truisms You May Hear Frequently

Every form of endeavor probably has its truisms and clichés.  Some are worth remembering; some not so much. But either way here is AMERiders anthology of selected motorcycle truisms, not necessarily ranked in any order or included based on any profound underlying truth.  In fact, it’s often the case that truisms just aren’t always true.

Motorcycle Truisms
Men’s Leather Motorcycle Jacket With Reflective Skulls

1st of our Motorcycle Truisms is “There are two kinds of riders—those that have fallen and those that are going to.”  We don’t know who actually coined that phrase, but it seems entirely likely that if you ride a motorcycle long enough, it’s bound to be made true. Just make sure when you fall you’re wearing protective gear. It may help you get home safer, like our Men’s Leather Motorcycle Jacket With Reflective Skulls design is made from Heavy duty Top grade naked cowhide leather with skulls that eerily reflect light at night to help you be seen better while riding. Not to mention many other great features.

Other features include features and multiple air vents with zipper closure for comfort when the asphalt gets hot. Sleek collar with button snaps, front zipper closure, zipper button snap cuffs, side zippers with button snap straps, removable back shoulder and elbow pads make this jacket extremely functional. Two front pockets with zipper closure and two inside pockets with snap closure hold various items safely so you can keep your eyes on the checkered flag. Open this jacket up to mesh lined and a full sleeve zip-out liner for the desired comfort in temperature fluctuations, great for cold weather or a summer cruising, and you will be prepared for the road ahead.

Motorcycle Truisms
6 inch Lace Zipper Boot Black

The 2nd of our Motorcycle Truisms “If it looks slippery, it probably is.”  Once again we are unsure of attribution for the originator of this practical admonition, but speaking from personal experience, it has proven to be an accurate assessment of the situation in the vast majority of cases.  Riding on snow with street tires brings this into very clear focus—although knobby tires don’t necessarily improve anything. This rings also true to make sure you are wearing boots with good tread. Like our Men’s 6″ Lace Zipper Boot Black is built for comfort, durability, and traction. Extra heavy duty traction sole for added protection and style. This boot has Goodyear welt construction and also features top quality full grain oil leather, the lace-up design with buckle strap, and YKK zipper. We do have this exact same model for women as well.

MotorThe 3rd of Motorcycle Truisms “If you have a ten dollar head, get a ten dollar helmet.”  Judging from helmet prices these days, it’s nearly impossible to get a ten dollar helmet even at a yard sale. Always make sure to use a great helmet anyway because it is more than likely possible that your head is worth more than $10.

Motorcycle Truisms
Black Race 3/4 Shell Motorcycle Helmet

Like this Black Race 3/4, Shell Motorcycle Helmet is a new 2010 RM6 helmet design and features unique-design geometry that optimizes both coverage and visibility in an open face helmet. The Snell RM5 is Rodia’s original state-of-the-art lightweight multi-purpose helmet featuring aggressive styling, comfortable fit, and outstanding ventilation. The Snell RM6 is always up to the challenge and can be used in any style of racing.

 

4th Motorcycle Truisms “Ride it like you stole it.”  This truism was taken seriously 46,061 times in the U.S. in 2012, which is the number of bikes stolen that year according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB). It has never made sense to me if your gonna ride it like you stole it, then ride slowly so no one catches you or suspects you.

5th Motorcycle Truisms “Speak your mind but ride a fast motorcycle.”  This is a paraphrase of the old Will Rogers quip, “Speak your mind but ride a fast horse.”  Much of what Will Rogers had to say was golden when he said it and still is today.

6th Motorcycle Truisms “Chrome won’t get you home.”  No doubt coined by someone afflicted with chrome envy after seeing a blingy Harley glistening in the sun—perhaps as it sat out of the action on the side of the road.

Motorcycle Truisms

7th Motorcycle Truisms “Loud pipes save lives.”  This weak validation of obnoxiously loud pipes on some bikes has, in at least one personal instance, proven to be somewhat true.  I was sailing along on I-39 in my car northbound on a great summer day when a bike was attempting to merge into traffic from the right. I didn’t see him, but as the distance between us closed, I could hear him and with a clear lane to my left was able to shift in time to avoid creating a squeeze play. Of course, he really only would have to amend his speed to merge if I hadn’t moved over without it really being a life-or-death situation, but it did prove that when a bike is in the blind spot, that exhaust note can make a difference.

8th Motorcycle Truisms “Win on Sunday, sell on Monday.”  This is the motorcycle marketing manager’s mantra that associates success on the race track with success in the showroom.  The connection between successful road racing or motocross bikes and sales of cruisers or conventional street bikes may be something of a push, but maybe the exposure from race coverage does the overall brand some good in terms of showroom traffic. On the other hand, there is some evidence to the contrary—BSA captured the first three places at the 1971 Daytona 200 but was out of business by the end of 1973.

Motorcycle Truisms

9th Motorcycle Truisms “Racing improves the breed.”  This truism has been adapted to motorsports of all sorts and the connection between racing and consumer-driven machines goes way back to the beginnings of motorized vehicles in general. It would seem to make sense, particularly where manufacturers are directly involved in the racing effort of designing, and building machines and using those machines as part of their product development program. But, as Phil Schilling observed in his book, “The Motorcycle World,” it’s a phrase that “makes sense only when the racing machines and road models bear some resemblance to one another and are adapted to the same set of conditions.”

10th and last of our Motorcycle Truisms “There is no substitute for cubic inches.”  Another one bandied about in nearly all motorsports. At one time, this was generally true, maybe back when virtually all engines were side valve, pushrod jobs and making the pistons larger and stroke longer was the formula for more horsepower. Some folks still cling to the notion, but it has long been proven that technology can trump displacement. No one has seen a 74 cubic inch pushrod V-twin try to stay with an RZ350. But then, to be fair, it was never intended to.

There is no doubt enough motorcycle truisms to fill a book or two.  These are but a few that come to mind.  Maybe you’d like to share a few.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Motorcycle Truisms

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on The Top Ten Motorcycle Truisms You May Hear Frequently.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Bessie Stringfield a True Trailblazer for Two-Wheeled Women Everywhere

If you were to read the list of places Bessie Stringfield rode to and the number of miles she racked up, you would be impressed if it had been done in the 1980s. Bessie, though, pulled it off long before then and in a time when some felt a woman like her shouldn’t even be on the road. AMERiders gives you a bit more information on this Biker you should know.

Information on Bessie Stringfield

A 5-foot-2 black woman, and only 19 when she started, Bessie began riding in the pre-WWII, pre-civil rights, pre-interstate highway era—facts that amplify her accomplishments even more.

Bessie Stringfield
Now that is a riding suit

Born on the island of Jamaica in 1911, her father was Jamaican and her mother a white Dutch woman. The family moved to Boston early on, but both of her parents died of smallpox when she was just 5 years old and she was adopted. Her early life is a little murky, and she has said that though her adopted family loved her and cared for her, she was not allowed to use their name.

It seems they were fairly well-to-do though because when Bessie asked for a motorcycle for her 16th birthday, the family gave her a new 1928 Indian Scout 101.

After graduating high school, Bessie started crisscrossing the country on her bike, working to earn money at carnivals and county fairs doing motorcycle stunts. Besides stunts, she would also compete in flat track events and hill climbs (I’m assuming she did this on whatever motorcycle she was touring on at the time).

Though history knows her as Bessie Stringfield, that is actually her third (of six) husband’s surname, which she kept because she was achieving a degree of fame by then.

Bessie Stringfield
Bessie looking extremely comfy on her Harley

Her many tours of the continental US carried her through the Great Depression, and she also managed trips to Brazil, Haiti, and Europe. When America entered World War II, Bessie volunteered herself and her bike (a Harley 61 knucklehead) as couriers. Going back and forth between homefront military installations, she eventually crossed the country another eight times for the Army.

Don’t forget: much of the country at the time still lacked major through-streets, many of which would have been barely paved, let alone lit or well marked.

Bessie Stringfield
You can see the CD badge, for Civilian Defense, on the front fender

After the war, now approaching middle age, Bessie didn’t slow down at all. She settled in Florida, eventually becoming known at the “Motorcycle Queen of Miami”. Some of the 1950s stories told about Bessie have her winning flat track races while disguised as a man then being denied the trophy when she revealed herself and demanding a one-on-one test of motorcycle skills from a local police chief so his officers would stop harassing her for riding through his town.

Professionally, she trained and got a job as a nurse, but continued to ride exhibitions. Eventually, she founded the Iron Horse motorcycle club, with whom she continued to ride with until she was in her 80s.

Bessie Stringfield
The Iron Horse Motorcycle Club, Bessie is the smaller woman

Bessie Stringfield has been honored by the AMA Hall of Fame, and the Harley-Davidson Museum (she owned 27 of their bikes in her lifetime), and is honored every year with the AMA Bessie Stringfield Award to honor women who are leaders in motorcycling. This amazing woman really deserves a feature-length film tribute, either a Ken Burns-style documentary or a big budget biopic.

You can find more details about Bessie on her Wikipedia page, or her AMA Museum page.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Bessie Stringfield

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders give you information on bikers you should know like Bessie Stringfield.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

What are the 7 Deadliest Roads In America You will be surprised.

In 2016, more than 40,000 road deaths were reported, the highest number since 2007. America has its share of no-guardrail mountain passes, and we can claim plenty of nail-biting country byways with more blind spots than a Six Flags coaster. But when it comes to danger, nothing beats the federal highway system. The country’s most-traveled, most mundane roads are a grim abattoir, and they’re getting grimmer. You may ask What are the 7 Deadliest Roads In America, well, AMERiders gives you the top highways you should, but probably won’t be able to, avoid.

I-80 in Wyoming

7 Deadliest Roads

Our first of our 7 Deadliest Roads is I-80 in Wyoming. On average, more than 17 people a year die on this Interstate, which once comprised part of the Oregon Trail. That equals the death toll of the Donner Party every two years or so. In April last year, a Laramie woman died during a dense fog when her Honda CR-V was sandwiched between a speeding UPS truck and a Penske moving truck driven by her husband. In 2015, a 45-year-old man and two children perished when they ran into the back of a semi. Another calamitous fog bank led to a terrible series of wrecks in 2014, with four dead and dozens injured. In the first crash, seven semis and a horse trailer burst into flames.

I-40 in Arizona

7 Deadliest Roads

Our second of our 7 Deadliest Roads is I-40 in Arizona.Once the western linchpin of Route 66, I-40 is no place to get your kicks. Nearly 25 fatal crashes a year occur on Arizona’s I-40, and stretches of I-40 in New Mexico and California also have terribly high fatal crash rates. Avoid. Last October, a passenger vehicle—and a passenger—disintegrated on the hood of an oncoming semi, as smoke from a planned forest burn reduced visibility on the road to basically nothing. Last year, a surprise May hailstorm led to a terrifying incident involving multiple rollovers: “The first rollover collision occurred due to hail and ice covering the roadway. Two people rushed to the aid of the victims from that roll-over and were struck by a commercial vehicle.”

US-83 in Texas

7 Deadliest Roads

The Third of our 7 Deadliest Roads is US-83 in Texas.Somewhat ironically known as the Vietnam Veterans Highway, this road consistently boasts one of the highest death rates in America, averaging 26 a year over the last decade. It will be even higher this year. In April, a 20-year-old high school football player, who was allegedly texting while driving his pickup truck, veered out of his lane and rammed into a bus full of elderly church members returning from a choir retreat in South Central Texas. Twelve people died at the scene, 13 total, prompting a federal investigation. “A crush of black skid marks. A curled-up fragment of a women’s gold watchband. A beaten-up black boot. A litter of lavender medical latex gloves and emptied water bottles,” the Austin-American Statesman reported of the remnants of the wreckage.

I-95 in the Carolinas

7 Deadliest Roads

Our 4th of our 7 Deadliest Roads is I-95 in the Carolinas.Nearly 450 people have died in this segment of the busy I-95 corridor in the last decade. But few accidents have been worse than the one that occurred near the state line recently. A Volvo gas tanker truck rear-ended a Dodge pickup, which ran into a Ford Explorer, which hit a Ford Escape. Meanwhile, the original tanker slammed into two big rigs, including a Freightliner, which burst into flames and barreled across the median. When it was all over, five people were dead, including the tanker driver and a family of four, including a one-year-old and four-year-old girl.

US-2 in Montana

7 Deadliest Roads

The 5th of our 7 Deadliest Roads is US-2 in Montana.For the most sparsely populated state, Montana sees more than its fair share of deadly crashes and has the highest rate of drunk driving in the country. US-2, America’s northernmost highway, always has a high death rate. Most famously and tragically, nine members of the Whitefish High School wrestling team died in 1984 while a school bus collided with a skidding semi near Glacier National Park, “its front end bursting into flames.” The crash haunts Whitefish to this day and is marked by a large memorial of stacked white crosses. But the road hasn’t gotten any safer. Last January, the most Montana road deaths occurred when a vehicle carrying railroad employees tried to pass a snowplow and rammed head-on into a truck from the state Department Of Transportation.

US-101 in Oregon

7 Deadliest Roads

On our 6th of our 7 Deadliest Roads which is US-101 in Oregon, two people die every month while enjoying the views from this scenic coastal highway. Last year, a 42-year-old woman lost control of her Toyota Corolla, which drove off the highway and overturned. Rescuers found the driver “partially submerged in three feet of water.” Earlier this year, in a dramatic incident, a man died after driving his late-90s BMW sedan into a bus that had been converted into a motorhome. On the deadly morning of Feb. 26, a Nissan Xterra collided with a Ford Taurus and the Xterra driver lost his life when his car caught fire. Meanwhile, a green 2002 Ford Explorer hit an ice patch, overturned, and the driver died. Earlier in February, three teenagers died when a Mitsubishi crashed while drag-racing. You don’t come back from Dead Man’s Curve on the Oregon 101.

US-1 in Florida

7 Deadliest Roads

And our last of our 7 Deadliest Roads is US-1 in Florida.This road has, by far, the highest death-per-crash rate in the United States, another dubious distinction for The Sunshine State. The news around US-1 is a constant stream of helmetless motorcyclists taking a spill coming out of the Keys and elderly drivers making bad judgments. Five people died last February when a driver turned his Mazda Tribute directly into the path of an oncoming Ford F-250, closing the highway for more than five hours. Given how dangerous the driving conditions can be on US-1, that shutdown probably came as a relief.

In conclusion

Riding a motorcycle can be dangerous if you don’t pay attention to what you and other people around you are doing… This includes the road you are riding on. Always wear protective gear and make sure your passenger has on protective gear as well.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Memorial Day

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you apprised of the 7 Deadliest Roads In America.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Part Two of A Guide To Motorcycle Riding Gear for Beginners

On Wednesday we gave you the first part of a guide to motorcycle gear for beginners below is part two of that article. As we stated then… we’re refreshing some older (but still helpful and informative) articles to help you all get ready to ride. Bits and parts of this article have been published throughout the time we’ve been online. This is the advice we dished out on some Motorcycle Riding gear for riders no matter if they are veterans, intermediate or beginners. Here we will also lay out some advice on gear and explain why you should never wear regular jeans on a bike. We have split this article into two parts making it easier to read.

Gloves

Motorcycle Riding Gear
Men’s Hard Knuckle Leather Suede & Textile Gloves

Your hands are an awesome combination of extreme fragility combined with utter necessity. You need them to do stuff and they’re also the first thing to touch down in any crash. So you need to protect them. Motorcycle gloves should fully cover your fingers, palm, the back of your hands and your wrists. There should be significant overlap between glove and jacket so that you never see any skin exposed between the two, and is a significant part of your Motorcycle Riding Gear.

In order for a glove to remain on your hand in a crash, it needs a retention strap around the wrist. Consider this feature a minimum entry point for any riding glove. After that, you want to look for strong, abrasion-resistant materials and strong, protected stitching. Materials like Kevlar are often spec’d for the stitching for their ability to resist abrasion and bursting.

Last, but not least is armor. While most motorcycle gloves spec armor for the knuckles, it’s actually the base of your palm that will impact in nearly any crash and which needs protection the most. Look for materials here that will slide rather than catch on the pavement and that can provide some impact protection. Armor anywhere else is welcome but can cause the glove to bind or pinch your hand as you grip the controls. Make sure any glove you choose allows you to operate the controls on your bike unimpeded.

 

Armor

Motorcycle Riding Gear
Men’s Black And Gray Mesh And Nylon Motorcycle Jacket

As mentioned above, motorcycle body armor protects you from impacts by absorbing energy that would otherwise be transferred to your joints, limbs, and body. Whether purchased separately or included in an item of Motorcycle Riding Gear, you want it to fit snugly in a manner that won’t see it shift or move around in a crash. It should be comfortable and not restrict movement. Also, think about its area of coverage; you want it to cover as much of you as possible. Some cheaper elbow protectors, for instance, don’t extend very far down your forearm while the real quality stuff does. Back protectors should ideally cover everything from your coccyx to the base of your neck.

Those back protectors are available in two levels of safety: CE1 and CE2. CE1 is the less safe of the two, but protectors made to that lower standard are often lighter, more flexible, cheaper, and breathe better. Protection you wear more often is better protection.

You can often upgrade the armor in an item of riding gear by ordering superior, but more expensive items and retrofitting them. To do this, check to see if the item of clothing features removable armor in Velcro pockets or similar. Because not all armor is of the same shape and size, ordering it from the same manufacturer as the item of clothing is typically necessary.

The most frequent upgrade you’ll perform is to the back protector. If you feel that your jacket’s or suit’s back protector is sub-par, you can fit a better one in the pocket or simply opt for a strap-on item (Not that kind of strap-on; get your mind out of the gutter), which you wear separately under the jacket or suit. Strap-on protectors typically cover a greater portion of your body.

Everything Else

Motorcycle Riding Gear
Full Face Motorcycle Helmet Visor

Other things to consider when thinking about Motorcycle Riding Gear is eye protection or a visor/face shield that is tinted You’ll likely also want to protect your eyes from glare and the sun. Wearing sunglasses inside a helmet can be tricky, so a tinted visor is the best option. You’ll need one specifically designed to fit your helmet. Always carry a clear visor with you if there’s even a slight chance you’ll be out after dark. Wearing a tinted visor at night is extremely dangerous, reducing your vision to an extreme degree.

Motorcycle Riding Gear
BIKER SUNGLASSES- BLACK FRAME/AMBER LENSES

We carry both types of eye protection to help keep your peepers safe, like these BIKER SUNGLASSES- BLACK FRAME/AMBER LENSES they are an updated version of the extremely popular Foamerz these wraparound sunglasses are available in smoke, clear or even stunning amber anti-fog polycarbonate lenses.Closed cell foam allows for ventilation while providing a comfortably cushioned lining to protect the eyes from wind and dust while flying down the road. Which any biker will tell you the most uncomfortable is having dust in your eyes.

Conclusion

Riding a motorcycle exposes you to extreme risk, variations in weather, and requires your full concentration and physical ability. Luckily, Motorcycle Riding Gear is available that can keep you safe in a crash, comfortable in any weather condition, reduce fatigue. As such, it should be considered a necessity when riding a motorcycle. Factor its cost into the overall price of purchasing a bike. There’s no such thing as not being able to afford good gear; reduce the price of the bike you’re buying until you can afford to buy the helmet, jacket, gloves, pants, and boots necessary to ride it.4

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~And as always.... ~Live Free Ride Hard~ <a href="http://www.ameriders.co/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/eagle.jpg" rel="attachment wp-att-777"><img class="alignleft wp-image-777 size-thumbnail" src="http://www.ameriders.co/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/eagle-150x150.jpg" alt="Memorial Day " width="150" height="150" /></a> &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; ~AMERiders <h2 style="text-align: center;">and</h2> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Let <a href="http://ameriders.com">AMERiders</a> keep you up to date with information on the 2017 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.</h2> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>And as always don't forget to send us your</em></strong> <em><strong>stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.</strong></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><strong>Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ameriders/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/ameriders" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.pinterest.com/ameriders/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Pinterest</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/107300416404007334648" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Google+</a>, and <a href="https://www.instagram.com/rcornelious1/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Instagram</a>) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.</strong></em></p>

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with a Guide To Motorcycle Riding Gear for Beginners.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Part One of A Guide To Motorcycle Gear for Beginners

Hey friends, riding season is upon us again so we’re refreshing some older (but still helpful and informative) articles to help you all get ready to ride. Bits and parts of this article have been published throughout the time we’ve been online. This is the advice we dished out on some riding gear for riders no matter if they are veterans, intermediate or beginners. Here we will also lay out some advice on gear and explain why you should never wear regular jeans on a bike. We have split this article into two parts making it easier to read. 

Just getting started riding motorcycles? Here’s everything you need to know about riding gear—helmets, jackets, gloves, boots and such—in one digestible package.

One of the most frequent inquiries we get here at AMERiders isn’t about which motorcycle to buy or how to learn to ride, but what gear to buy and wear once you’ve accomplished all that. Here’s the info you need to make smart decisions, to be more comfortable, safer and, hopefully, save some money in the process.

Why You Need Good Gear

Beginner

Last time we checked, the fastest human in the world is Usain Bolt. During the 100-meter sprint, he peaked at 27.78 mph. If he were to fall going that speed, he’d likely sustain serious injuries; the human body simply didn’t evolve to go any faster. Which is why even falling off a horse (Guinness World Record top speed: 43.97 mph) can lead to death.

Riders that are Beginners Pay attention! On a motorcycle, you’re going to be traveling much faster. Even around town, you’ll be hitting 50 mph or more and, on the highway, you may find yourself exceeding 85 mph. Your skin, bones, and organs were not designed to withstand impacts at those speeds.

Then there’s the question of abrasion. As a general rule of thumb, figuring the average road surface, you can expect to lose one millimeter of flesh for every mile per hour you’re going over 30 when you crash. So, at the top speed of that horse, you’ll have lost 1.4cm (or more than half an inch) of skin and muscle. Where on your body can you afford to lose that much? And that’s at only 44 mph. What if you crash at 70 mph and lose an inch and a half? We’re talking serious, life-threatening injuries from abrasion alone.

Then there’s the weather. What if it’s kinda cold out? Even at, say, a 50F ambient temperature, windchill at 55 mph is going to make it feel like it’s 25F. In other words: from the kind of temperature in which you might need a light sweater, to the kind of cold where you want long undies and a down jacket. Getting wet would compound that much further.

Gear can even help when it’s hot, by better allowing your body’s natural evaporative cooling effect to take place. Under constant wind blast, the sweat is blown off your skin too quickly for it to have a cooling effect. Put on a (summer) jacket, helmet, boots, gloves and pants, however, and your body is free to cool itself as designed.

Luckily, mankind has achieved through science what evolution has failed to provide: clothing that protects you from accidents and the elements, and makes riding an easier, more comfortable experience.

Helmets

Beginners
DOT Full Face Winebury Modular Motorcycle Helmet helps to stay safe

According to a study published by Dietmar Otte, 45 percent of all impacts to motorcycle helmets occur around the face, in an area not covered by open-face or three-quarter-type helmets. You really, really, really want to be wearing a full-face helmet. As an added bonus, they’ll keep the wind out of your eyes and bugs out of your teeth, too.

Helmets typically have a five-year life. After that, the glue and whatnot used to bond layers of the EPS impact absorption material (precisely tailored densities of Styrofoam) may begin to degrade, impacting safety.

Like the crumple zone in a car, helmets are also designed to destroy themselves in a crash, thereby dissipating the energy that would otherwise be transferred to your head. Sometimes a helmet can experience a crash without external signs of damage but still sustain unseen effects. To ensure that your helmet is fully capable of protecting you, always buy a new helmet and treat it like a baby. Beginners here is a break down of helmets.

Types of helmets
beginners
HJC SY-MAXIII MATTE BLACK FULL FACE MODULAR HELMET

Street helmets look like this. Along with full-face lids—which are the safest by far—thereise also all manner of smaller, open-faced helmets. While the latter provides ample protection for the top of your head, they’re not the best at protecting your face.

Beginner
DOT Certified Red/Silver Kids MX ATV Helmet

Dirt helmets look like this. You wear them with goggles. Yes, they do protect your face, but that pronounced chin may exaggerate torsional forces in a crash. They’ll also be noisy and unstable at highway speeds. Choose the right helmet for the kind of riding you plan to do.

BeginnersTo be legally worn on the road in America, a motorcycle helmet must be marked with a DOT-approved sticker. You’ll see those affixed prominently on the back.

That’s just a minimal legal standard, though. Two other certifications compete for your dollar by promising greater safety, both voluntary in the United States. “ECE 22.05” is the European Union’s legal standard, while there’s also something called Snell, which is popular with a number of large helmet manufacturers.

 

The shape and size of every person’s head is unique. You need to find a helmet that fits you perfectly; sizes and shapes vary heavily between manufacturers and models. To determine your shape and size, visit a large brick-and-mortar retailer and try on every helmet you can. You’ll know one fits when it evenly holds your head all the way around, with no pressure points. Put it on, grasp the chin and try to rotate the helmet while resisting the movement with your head. The helmet shouldn’t be able to rotate independently of your scalp. It should fit snugly, but not be too tight. (Note that a new helmet can often feel very tight, though)

Other considerations to bear in mind are weight, noise, and aerodynamics.

Jackets

beginners
Ladies Genuine Buffalo Leather Motorcycle Jacket

A jacket covers the other stuff on your body that’s fragile and important: arms, back, ribs, organs – all that fun stuff. You absolutely must choose a motorcycle-specific jacket for purposes of both safety and comfort. Fashion leather jackets and similar are not made to withstand either the wind-blast or crashes that real motorcycle jackets are built to deal with. Beginners here is some information on Jackets and types.

Motorcycle jackets fall into two categories: leather and textile. High-quality textile materials like 1000 denier Cordura are able to resist abrasion as strongly as leather, while typically coming equipped with Gore-Tex or other water-resistant membranes capable of keeping you dry in bad weather. Leather helps you look the way you’d expect a classic “biker” to look, though, and jackets made from it typically last (a lot) longer and fit more closely to the body. Textile jackets are often more affordable.

beginners
WOMENS TEXTILE RACER JACKET WITH MULTI POCKETS

Both motorcycle-specific leather and textile jackets come with all sorts of features you won’t find elsewhere: seams are doubled up multiple times to protect the stitching from abrasion and increase strength against bursting; they’re designed to fit snugly in high-speed wind blast; they can seal out cold air or let in cooling air via vents. They should also have body armor — impact absorbing material that cushions your most vulnerable parts in a crash.

In order to be effective, that armor should come with a CE safety rating. You want it on the elbows, shoulders, and back. Some jackets also fit chest protectors to protect your ribs, heart, and lungs – again, look for that CE rating. Many jackets cut costs by simply including a piece of foam in place of a real back protector. Often, there’s a pocket shaped to fit a real back protector sold by the same company.

You want the jacket to fit snugly but leave your arms free to articulate fully. Consider the style of bike you ride and choose a jacket cut to work in its riding position. For example, sportbikes require you to hunch over, requiring some extra articulation for a jacket to be comfortable with them.

beginners
Men’s Black And Green Mesh And Nylon Motorcycle Jacket

Then, think about what kind of weather you’ll most frequently be riding in. Jackets made from mesh, perforated leather, or with lots of zip-open vents are good for warm weather but not the cold or wet, and vice versa.

Some jackets feature zippers around the bottom, enabling them to connect to a pair of riding pants – forming a suit. Doing so better seals out the elements and helps the whole thing stay on in a crash, but those zippers often require matching tops and bottoms from the same company – sized correctly – to work.

Pants

beginners
Textile Motorcycle Pants

Beginners we can’t say this enough Regular denim jeans will not protect you in a motorcycle accident.!!

Jeans that are either made from or include Kevlar panels offer slightly more abrasion resistance, but are still a compromise, offering nothing like the protection of a true pair of riding pants.

Like jackets, pants are available in leather or textile materials and should be equipped with CE-rated armor in the hips, shins, and knees. They should fit snugly, but be comfortable and allow full leg articulation. Try them on a bike, or stand in a riding position close to that of your own to determine if they’ll work.

beginner
Cream Dream catcher Women’s Chaps

If you want to zip pants to your jacket, make sure the manufacturer advertises the compatibility of the pair. Identical names are a good hint here, but look a the circumference of the zipper (Does it wrap fully around your waist or only partially?) for a good idea of whether it will work. Again, you’ll typically need pants and jacket from the same manufacturer.

If you don’t want to wear riding pants at least use chaps!

Boots

beginners
WOMEN’S BIKER BOOTS WITH EAGLE AT ANKLE

Most street bikes weigh more than 350 pounds. Frequently, they’re much heavier. You’ll need to support that weight and your own through your legs, ankles, and feet on slippery, uneven, unpredictable surfaces. For that reason alone, a sturdy pair of boots with oil-resistant, non-slip soles and good ankle support should be considered a minimum.

Your feet and ankles are also vulnerable in a crash, so you’ll want to protect them. To see what will happen to your feet in a crash in a given pair of footwear, grasp them by the toe and heel, then twist. If the result doesn’t look like your foot would survive intact, then it probably won’t.

begnnersBeginners in a riding boot, you want soles that prevent that twisting. Frequently, that’s accomplished with a metal plate running through the sole. Strong heel and toe boxes also help lock your feet in and reduce the force of impacts to those areas. Armor over the ankle and shin protects those areas.

Any boot considered for riding a motorcycle should lace tightly to a point above the ankle. Anything less and it will likely fly off in an accident, offering zero protection.

Conclusion

Riding a motorcycle exposes you to extreme risk, variations in weather, and requires your full concentration and physical ability. Luckily, motorcycle gear is available that can keep you safe in a crash, comfortable in any weather condition, reduce fatigue. As such, it should be considered a necessity when riding a motorcycle. Factor its cost into the overall price of purchasing a bike. There’s no such thing as not being able to afford good gear; reduce the price of the bike you’re buying until you can afford to buy the helmet, jacket, gloves, pants, and boots necessary to ride it. Our hopes is that this article and its concluding one this Friday will help our beginners with their riding gear.

Friday we will give you the conclusion to this article.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

National Month

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on our Guides To Motorcycle Gear for Beginners.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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What National Month events do we celebrate in April, Some are outlandish!

Many countries adopt causes or special interest groups to highlight and promote during given calendar months. The U.S. is particularly prolific at creating “national month” events to promote business and other interests. April is one of the few months that doesn’t have a long list of ridiculous observations, although there are a good many national month observances in the spring. AMERiders went searching to find a list of What National Month events do we celebrate in April? What we found were that some are outlandish!

Partial National Month Calendar for April

national monthBesides your taxes being due on this month (the 17th) we found out that this partial list below is just some of the “National Month” Calendar in April. Some raise awareness of health conditions, focus on healthy activities, and spotlight specific areas of interest. Schools, healthcare organizations, and community programs may have activities planned around these observances.

The following events, industries, causes and emotions—yes, emotions—are observed month-long in April unless otherwise indicated. Even cannabis, Florida tomatoes, celery and soft pretzels are honored…all month long.

  • Alcohol Awareness Month
  • American Cancer Society Month
  • Fresh Florida Tomato Month
  • Financial Literacy Month
  • Distracted Driving Awareness Month
  • Jewish-American Heritage Month
  • National Humor Month
  • Keep America Beautiful Month
  • The month of the Military Child
  • National Autism Awareness Month
  • National Cannabis Awareness Month
  • National Car Care Awareness Month
  • National Decorating Month
  • Stress Awareness Month
  • National Month of Hope
  • National Soft Pretzel Month
  • National Safe Digging Month

Here at AMERiders although we laughed at Fresh Florida Tomato Month, and Soft Pretzel Month we celebrate American Cancer Society Month, the month of the Military Child and Stress Awareness Month. This is just a small part of what is celebrated you can search (what month you would like to know about ) is national what month? And you will find a list on many different sites.

Did you know that riding a motorcycle can relieve stress?

National MonthWhen riding a motorcycle, the brain of the rider is stimulated. Differences in brain use and level of brain stimulation can be observed in motorcyclists who ride regularly and in motorcyclists who have not ridden for extended periods (at least 10 years). Incorporating motorcycle riding into daily life improves various cognitive functions (particularly prefrontal cortex functions) and has positive effects on mental and emotional health such as stress reduction. So Bikers should always celebrate Stress Awareness Month. During the month of April, health care professionals and health promotion experts across the country will annually join forces to increase public awareness about both the causes and cures for our modern stress epidemic. 

International Guitar Month

National MonthBikers love music so why not celebrate International Guitar Month which is recognized in several countries. Every April, guitarists and music aficionados from around the world gather physically, virtually and mentally to recognize both the instruments and the talented musicians who bring them to life. International Guitar Month (IGM) was created in 1987 as an annual celebration of guitars and guitar products.

The month of the Military Child

 

National MonthApril is designated as the Month of the Military Child, underscoring the important role military children play in the armed forces community. Sponsored by the Department of Defense Military Community and Family Policy, the Month of the Military Child is a time to applaud military families and their children for the daily sacrifices they make and the challenges they overcome.

The Month of the Military Child is part of the legacy left by former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger. He established the Defense Department commemoration in 1986.

How to celebrate these holidays

Celebrating these events and holidays can be done in many ways, some have specific ways you can do so, and some provide festivals and events. Don’t forget to wear your protective gear however if you ride out to these festivals and you can grab some of that here. Some of our items can be used to actually celebrate the holiday or event as well.  Like National Humor Month, you can find something that looks funny or humorous on our site and wear it while you ride this month. Like this DOT VENTED PINK BONEYARD LADIES MOTORCYCLE HALF HELMET , Now you may not think this is humorous lol… stick it on a big strapping guy and everyone will laugh. After all, that is what you will be going for is the laughter.

Search through the site for some ideas you know you have some brewing already. Have fun each month finding something to celebrate.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

National Month

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on What National Month events we celebrate in April.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

How the Confederate Flag became the symbol of Rebellion

If you were born in the south then the Confederate battle flag is a familiar part of your world. AMERiders knows that the symbolism of the flag is simple and straightforward: It represents the Confederate side in the war that you enjoy studying. More than likely, your knowledge of the flag has expanded and become more sophisticated over the years. We want to give you the knowledge of How the Confederate Flag became the symbol of Rebellion.

History of the Confederate Flag

At some point, you learned that the Confederate battle flag was not, in fact, “the Confederate flag” and was not known as the “Stars and Bars.” That name properly belongs to the first national flag of the Confederacy. If you studied the war in the Western and Trans-Mississippi theaters, you learned that “Confederate battle flag” is a misnomer. Many Confederate units served under battle flags that looked nothing like the red flag with the star-studded blue cross. You may have grown up with more than just an idle knowledge of the flag’s association with the Confederacy and its armies, but also with a reverence for the flag because of its association with Confederate ancestors.

If you didn’t, your interest in the war likely brought you into contact with people who have a strong emotional connection with the flag. And, at some point in your life, you became aware that not everyone shared your perception of the Confederate flag. If you weren’t aware of this before, the unprecedented flurry of events and of public reaction to them that occurred in June 2015 have raised obvious questions that all students of Civil War history must confront: Why do people have such different and often conflicting perceptions of what the Confederate flag means, and how did those different meanings evolve?

Confederate FlagThe flag as we know it was born not as a symbol, but as a very practical banner. The commanders of the Confederate army in Virginia (then known at the Army of the Potomac) sought a distinctive emblem as an alternative to the Confederacy’s first national flag—the Stars and Bars—to serve as a battle flag.

The Stars and Bars

The Stars and Bars, which the Confederate Congress had adopted in March 1861 because it resembled the once-beloved Stars and Stripes, proved impractical and even dangerous on the battlefield because of that resemblance. (That problem was what compelled Confederate commanders to design and employ the vast array of other battle flags used among Confederate forces throughout the war.)Battle flags become totems for the men who serve under them, for their esprit de corps, for their sacrifices. They assume emotional significance for soldiers’ families and their descendants. Anyone today hoping to understand why so many Americans consider the flag an object of veneration must understand its status as a memorial to the Confederate soldier.

It is, however, impossible to carve out a kind of symbolic safe zone for the Confederate battle flag as the flag of the soldier because it did not remain exclusively the flag of the soldier. By the act of the Confederate government, the battle flag’s meaning is inextricably intertwined with the Confederacy itself and, thus, with the issues of slavery and states’ rights—over which readers of Civil War Times and the American public as a whole engage in spirited and endless debate.

The Flag’s Reputation Damaged

Confederate FlagWhen the civil rights movement gathered force, especially in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, defenders of segregation increasingly employed the use of the battle flag as a symbol of their cause. Most damaging to the flag’s reputation was its use in the hands of the Ku Klux Klan. Although founded by Confederate veterans almost immediately after the Civil War, the KKK did not use the Confederate flag widely or at all in its ritual in the 1860s and 1870s or during its rebirth and nationwide popularity from 1915 to the late 1920s. Only with a second rebirth in the late 1930s and 1940s did the battle flag take hold in the Klan.

How the flag became the symbol of Rebellion

Confederate FlagWhen the dam burst on Confederate flag material culture and heritage groups lost control of the flag, it acquired a new identity as a symbol of “rebellion” divorced from the historical context of the Confederacy. Truckers, motorcycle riders and “good ol’ boys” (most famously depicted in the popular television show The Dukes of Hazzard) gave the flag a new meaning that transcends the South and even the United States. Calling themselves “REBELS”

Today

Many believe that it should be displayed within its historical context, such as at museums, reenactments, living histories, etc. and some also believe, it is appropriate to own one if you are an avid historian and lover of the time period, but people should take care to remember and be sensitive about what it can symbolize to others.

Confederate FlagBikers wear their proud rebel patches as symbols of what they are, it is just our way. We understand and know the history of the flag whether it be the true history or what others would have us believe. (Some just used the selective parts they want to use to make their own points).

At AMERiders we offer many different ways to show your Rebel side from patches, to boot gear to protective gear and more. Like this Men’s Lambskin Leather Vest with Rebel Flag that’s fitted with two large slip pockets inside and two roomy stash pockets on the waist for any personal items, you’d care to carry. With a soft black lining and button snap closure, your comforts guaranteed and it is finished with stylish pleating on the front. This incredible vest won’t last long so order now.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Confederate Flag

 

 

 

 

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders tell you How the Confederate Flag became the symbol of Rebellion.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.