When Does the Fall Ride End and the Winter Season Begin?

When you think of riding your motorcycle, you probably imagine an enjoyable ride through your favorite scenic area during pleasant weather. Unfortunately, the weather isn’t always that predictable or pleasant. When the weather changes unexpectedly, riders must adapt to situations that may affect the road or impact their ability to safely operate a motorcycle. The same goes for the seasons you might say, especially in winter. AMERiders explains.

Some stop their riding season as soon as they have to start wearing their sweaters, others ride all year long it doesn’t matter to them. Me, I don’t really enjoy the frigid winter ride although I have been on a few. Unless you live in Quebec where winter tires are mandatory from December to March and you bought an extra pair of snow-friendly rubbers for your bike, there aren’t any guidelines for the right and the wrong time to ride your motorcycle. At least not legally. 

This means that if you live North of the country and you’re courageous enough, there doesn’t need to be a clearly defined “riding season” in your version of the universe. Some people even willingly take their rides out in the winter so really, it all comes down with how motivated you are.

That being said, there are a few things you should be aware of if you are compelled to continue to ride when others are plugging their bike’s battery on tenders, adding fuel preservatives, and calling it a day.

Keep Warm

Of course, it all starts with keeping warm. Just like taking your bike out in the middle of winter, ensuring your comfort in the saddle will make a world of difference between an enjoyable experience and a trip to the doctor for frostbites. Keep in mind that at highway speeds, the temperature you feel with the wind is a dozen degrees below the one displayed on the thermometer, so gear up. 

Not even the warmest piece of gear is infallible in the face of cold’s nip, so layering up to add and remove pieces as the temperature fluctuates is a must. You can even add a set of heated gear to your collection to efficiently face frostier temperatures. Considering fall can have a bit of a bad rep when it comes to the number of sunny days, waterproof equipment isn’t a luxury either because once water seeps through, cold isn’t far behind. 

Motorcycle Winter Tires?

Also, keep in mind that chances are the compound in your tires isn’t designed to face cold temperatures. This means your tires take longer to warm up and might lose a bit of their elasticity and their ability to “stick” to the road, in case you feel particularly dare devilish. You might not have the same quality of traction you do in the summer. There are winter tires for bikes, that’s if you feel the need to start swapping tires every time. 

Slipping And Sliding

One of my favorite things to do during fall is to go where the leaves are pretty. A lush landscape of red and yellow leaves contrasting the evergreens has a flavor only us northerners can truly recognize and understand. That being said, as pretty as the leaves are in the trees, once they start littering the road, they turn into a bit of a hazard. Especially if they’re wet. 

Be mindful that like grass clippings in the summer, ice in the winter, and leftover gravel in the spring, dead leaves are fall’s natural safety hazards. Anything that has the potential of reducing traction is. Adapt to that possibility and try to avoid an avoidable slip. 

winter
Watch out for Jack Frost

The further we crawl towards the return of winter, the higher the chances are you’ll have to deal with frozen puddles and frost after the sun sets and before it rises. Speaking of rising and setting sun—darkness rolls in a lot faster once we’re on the left side of the school year calendar. Once the sun goes down, so does visibility and temperatures—something else to keep in mind especially if you’re exploring unchartered territories. 

Deer Lord!

winter
Watch for wildlife

And of course, there’s a reason why in the fall, some of your friends disappear for a few days at the time and reappear in pictures on social media, posing with the 700-lb hoofed beast they just hunted down: it’s deer season. In a battle between deer and motorcycle, nobody wins. 

Be on the lookout for a jumping Bambi that might decide to frolic across the road as you’re leaning out of a blind curve. According to Famers Insurance, the risks of hitting an animal in the fall are higher than in the summer while over a third of collisions involving animals happen between September and November. We’ll find you some tips for helping to avoid those little buggers and let you know what we found next week.

Bottom line, it’s not a matter of how far into the season you should go for a ride, it’s about wanting to do it and adapting your behavior accordingly. Safe riding and don’t let the frost bugs bite. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

winter

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on When does the fall ride end and the Winter season begin?

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Are Drivers Forgetting They See Us? A Recent Study Says Possibly, Yes.

Recently we talked about being hit by drivers turning left or talking on their phones because they just “didn’t see us”. Well, A new study from the University of Nottingham in the UK found that the reason why some car drivers don’t see us may not be what we think. AMERiders explains the recent study.

It’s not that drivers don’t see us; it’s that they forget us, say, researchers. The number of near-misses that every experienced motorcyclist can report would surely raise the hair on the backs of the necks of our loved ones. No matter how careful we may try to be, or how many precautions we may try to take, or even how hard we cling to ATGATT, there are always factors we can’t control. Many of those are the other road users around us—and particularly, drivers. 

Up until now, we’ve always heard “Oh, I just didn’t see you,” from car drivers—and it’s made us angry and/or frustrated, because how could they not see us? If they were telling the truth, why on earth did they even have driver’s licenses?

According to university researchers, the failure may not be inattention on the part of those drivers after all. Instead, it may be short-term memory loss. In a series of three separate tests conducted with a BMW MINI and a driving simulator, researchers observed and tested male and female licensed UK drivers across a range of ages. Full methodology and details of how these tests were conducted can be found in the full study in the journal PLOS One.

All three tests found that some drivers seemed to register motorcycles as they scanned the road—but then seemingly forgot they were there. In fact, that whole “Look twice, save a life” thing may even partly be to blame. Interestingly, it seemed that the act of looking twice made it more likely that a driver would remember the most recent thing they saw—effectively overwriting whatever they saw on their first pass. 

It’s important to note here that this study also found that many drivers incorrectly estimate the distance of other vehicles from their location. These two misperceptions go together to create one very ugly sandwich. If you look once and see a motorcycle that appears far away from you, and then you look again, you may not see it because you expect it to be farther away than it is. 

Well, That’s Horrifying. Can We Do Anything About It?

drivers

Typical interpretations…are based on the idea that the driver pulling out has failed to devote sufficient attention to the traffic on the road.
The most striking finding was not subtle biases in vision or memory, but the fact that in some cases there was a complete absence of memory, particularly for approaching motorcycles.

DR PETER CHAPMAN, AN EXPERT IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF DRIVING

Researchers have a solution that may help. Instead of our well-worn moto safety phrases “Start seeing motorcycles” and “Look twice, save a life,” we should probably start telling people “See bike, say bike.” 

It may sound silly at first, but it turns out that adding this spoken and auditory component helps your brain more fully register that you just saw a bike, and you should watch out for it on the road around you. You’re less likely to forget that you saw a bike on your second visual pass if you took the time to say it aloud. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Are Drivers Forgetting They See Us? A Recent Study Says Possibly, Yes.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Photo: Carrington Vanston on Flickr

Sources: PLOS OneITVScience Daily

Tech Alert: Series 4 Apple Watch Can Save Your Life in a Motorcycle Crash

Are you a fan of Apple Products if you are you, should know that the Series 4 Apple Watch could just save your life in a motorcycle crash with its fall detection feature. Some of us in the AMERiders family have the Apple Watch in various Series, and we love them and are glad for this feature since we ride.

Just because some of us may be young and fit and not prone to falling down, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t enable the fall detection feature. Rethinking this choice could actually save your life as a motorcycle rider. I and my husband both have an Apple Watch and even though we ride on the bike at the same time we both wear our watches we haven’t used it for this particular feature but used it for other medical issues that deal with falling.

Consider this, we do not plan to crash when any of us throws a leg over our motorcycle. We do not say to ourselves, “this is the day I’m going to go hit another vehicle!” Not at all, every last one of us figures we’re going to get to our destination and get on with our day. We do know that plans go awry sometimes. That’s why many of us wear all our protective motorcycle gear on every ride.

The smart devices we wear or have on our persons, these days often have accelerometers in them, they can tell when we’ve had an “unplanned get-off,” if you will. The way our bodies move (and “stop moving”) in a fall is apparently unique to anything else we do. These watches have been programmed to detect that movement and go into an alert mode. The phone will ask you if you’ve had a fall, and if so, if you’d like it to alert the authorities. You can decline the assistance, tell the watch it’s mistaken and that you didn’t have a fall, or say “yes, OK, call an ambulance for me.” If the watch detects a severe impact and you do not reply to its prompts, it will assume you are unconscious and call for medical help.

apple watch

That is exactly what happened when Bob Burdett took a hard fall at the bottom of a hill, going over 20mph on his mountain bike. He was wearing a helmet, and it’s lucky that he was, because he hit his head so hard that he said it could’ve killed him if he hadn’t been wearing it. The hit knocked him completely unconscious, according to the Seattle Times.

When he woke up, he was in an ambulance on his way to Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center. Prior to his ride, he’d thankfully turned on the Apple Watch fall detection feature in his watch. It alerted emergency services and sent them his coordinates while he was incapacitated. 

As a result, EMTs were able to find him and administer the necessary emergency medical care and get him to safety. For those unfamiliar, the fall detection service displays alerts and vibrates to get your attention so that you don’t accidentally call 911 after you, say, slam your car trunk harder than you meant to do. If you don’t respond within 30 seconds, it then assumes you’re incapacitated and dials emergency services.

It’s one thing to read about a feature like this in a user manual, and think that it sounds like a great idea. However, it’s completely another to see it out in the wild and potentially changing lives for the better. Burdett might have been out on his mountain bike, but he could just as easily have been doing some off-road motorbike investigation of local trails, out on his own. Plenty of solo riders do exactly that.  

A get-off where you can walk your bike out of the mud, hop on, and go on your way is fine—but a serious head wound or other bad fall injury isn’t something any of us want to try to handle on our own. Reading a story like this makes it all the more clear how tech like this can have a positive impact on real riding experiences. This could potentially be one more added piece of gearing up for the slide, not the ride. 

I personally own a few Apple products and am happy to see that this feature actually does work we haven’t used it yet riding but do plan on it. Props to Apple for coming up with this life saving feature, though—it’s a pretty important one that could have many applications, even apart from those on two wheels. Seeing more devices from competitors with a feature like this would certainly not be a bad thing, either.

Just a note though: the alert in these watches is based on impact. If you are into things like martial arts, you may want to take the watch off for those activities so it’s not calling the ambulance to your dojo every week. Otherwise, all the riders out there with Apple watches might want to turn this particular function on, at least for the duration of your riding season, and especially if you ride alone. It could get help to you quickly in the event of a crash.

Android watches have several accelerometer-based fall detection apps available as well, in case you’re an Android fan. I hope this has been an informative article for you.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Series 4 Apple Watch Can Save Your Life in a Motorcycle Crash.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

United States Leg of WRWR Is Backed by Indian Motorcycles

Female ridership has boomed in the past few years when the Motorcycle Industry Council reported that women made up 19 percent of the motorcycle-owning public in 2018. That’s a  considerable jump from representing only 10 percent of the motorcycling community in 2009. With women fostering new communities around the sport, brands are offering more diverse gear and sponsoring events that promote sisterhood. One such event is the Women Riders World Relay (WRWR), and Indian Motorcycle recently announced that they are proud backers of the world tour—just in time for the American leg. AMERiders explains

Hayley Bell, a motorcycle enthusiast from the UK, founded the WRWR to bring more attention to this often-ignored segment of riders. The global relay debuted in Scotland on February 26 and already passed through countries like Italy, Switzerland, Romania, Iran, India, Thailand, and Australia. The tour will conclude in the United Arab Emirates in February 2020, one year after the beginning of the world-wide journey.

On September 24, 2019, the relay will end it’s Canadian leg with a ride from Fredericton, New Brunswick. Riders will crisscross the St. John River before handing off the baton to their US counterparts at the St. Croix River crossing/border. 

The US stage of the WRWR will consist of 18 legs over the course of 18 days. From September 25 through October 12, 2019, the route will wind through the northern states of New York, Ohio, Illinois, and South Dakota before cutting through Utah and Nevada for Southern California. After a stop in Los Angeles, the relay will tour through Colorado and the Southwestern states, ultimately crossing into Mexico from the Laredo, Texas border. 

Indian’s involvement will help shape the US stretch of the WRWR with ride leaders piloting Chieftains and Roadmasters donated by the manufacturer. The route will also include a stop in the birthplace of the American company, Springfield, Massachusetts, for a visit to the Wood Museum of Springfield History, which houses the historic Indian Motorcycle Collection. On the fifth day of the US itinerary, riders will be treated to a tour of the Indian Motorcycle factory in Spirit Lake, Iowa. 

“No matter gender, race, or religion, riding around the world is an incredible feat,” said Reid Wilson, Vice President of Indian Motorcycle. “We are proud to welcome and support our women riders and hope to inspire courage, unity, and pride for generations to come.” 

As motorcyclists, it’s encouraging to see advocacy for diversity from such large companies. The more people that ride, the more products manufacturers can offer, and that’s a win-win for everyone. If the riding community and motorcycle companies can continue this momentum, maybe we’ll see another large increase of women who ride in the next decade. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

and

WRWR

~AMERiders

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on United States Leg of WRWR Is Backed by Indian Motorcycles.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

As the Days Get Shorter Here Are Some Tips for Your Night Riding

As the days get shorter, that means night riding and trying to stretch the riding season out for as long as we can of course. Some of us never stop riding through winter. Night riding opens up a whole new set of hazards, though, mainly related to seeing and being seen. Here’s how to prepare yourself to be a night rider. AMERiders gives you a few tips on how to see and be seen at night.

Upgrade Your Lighting

Without the sun to light your way, you have to rely on whatever light your bike can throw in front of you to see where you’re going. Stock headlights range in quality from pretty good to utterly abysmal, so this is a good place to start. In the past, running more powerful halogen bulbs has been a popular solution. This draws more power from your already weak electrical system, though. Plus, your wiring harness may not be able to handle the extra power. A great solution is LED bulbs. Not only do they produce more light, but they also draw less power than your original halogen bulb. The light they produce is also a pure white rather than halogen’s yellowish tinge, which is a bit more eye-catching. Make sure you invest in a good bulb.

night

While you’re at it, put an LED bulb in your tail light(s), too. It(they) will last longer, and your brake light(s) will be more visible thanks to its instant-on nature. You can upgrade your turn signals to LED as well, but this often involves some shenanigans with resistors, relays, and such to keep them flashing at the correct speed.

Add More Lighting

In addition to the lights the bike came with, you can also add more of your own. The Honda PC800’s headlight beam pattern is terrible, to the point where not even a Cyclops bulb helped improve it much. Adding a pair of cheap LED driving lights from SuperBrightLEDs.com to supplement the weak headlight made a difference. Look for a “spot” beam pattern, which throws light a good distance down the road while still illuminating the sides just a bit. Pencil beams are good for high-speed highway riding. Flood beams will only light the general area right in front of you, so while they’re good work lights, avoid them for this purpose. Whatever you get, be careful to aim them away from oncoming drivers’ eyes. You don’t want to have them swerve into you due to their target fixation on your bright lights.

Again, tail lights are worth upgrading, too, so you can be seen from behind. When a friend replaced their Honda Shadow’s turn signals, they tied them in with the stock tail light so that when they weren’t flashing as a turn signal they shined steadily, giving them three tail lights instead of one. they used red turn signals for this purpose since most states frown upon amber tail lights. Another friend used had a Honda PC800, he used an AdMore Lighting’s kit to install LED brake, turn, and tail lights in his Givi top trunk. This puts a complete second set of lights at drivers’ eye level, making them quite difficult to ignore. He also added a brake light flasher that briefly flickers the LEDs before they shine steadily, again to get drivers’ attention. This may or may not be 100% legal, as it’s a flashing red light. My friends have not had any trouble from law enforcement yet, however, just to be safe, though, unplug these lights for state inspection, since the bike’s original lighting still works fine.

Reflective Tape

You don’t have to rely on your own lighting to be seen. Reflective tape lights up your bike from other people’s headlights, making you even brighter than before. Some people go nuts with white, yellow, amber, and red tape everywhere. Some even like the blacked-out look adding several strips of black reflective tape to the saddlebags. The black strips are invisible during the day but lit up white at night to make you much more visible.

You can get as creative as you want with this. Cut out pretty designs. Stick it anywhere you want, including your helmet or jacket. Some riding gear comes with reflective piping sewn into it, which is also helpful.

Slow Down And Watch Out

We’ve covered how to see and be seen, but it’s also worth mentioning that you should change the way you ride at night. You should only ride as fast as you can see, and be able to stop within the distance your lights shine ahead of you. As tempting as an empty highway in the middle of the night can be for high-speed shenanigans, think of the deer crossing the road that you may not see until it’s too late. Another hazard is drivers who set off with only their daytime running lights on, leaving them completely unlit from behind.

As always, you have to watch out for “the other guy,” and that’s even truer for your night riding. It’s much more likely that other people on the road have been drinking at night than during the day. If it’s particularly late, people will be tired, which can adversely affect driving ability almost as much as alcohol.

Even if you haven’t upgraded your lighting or added any reflective tape, this is one step you can take on any bike to be safer on the road. Of course, upgrading your lights lets you see farther down the road, which lets you increase your speed. Even then, though, you should slow down a bit from your daytime pace.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information Some Tips for Your Night Riding.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Pesky Traffic Signal Lights and How We Motorcyclists Can Fix Them.

Ah, the pesky traffic signal. Far too often, they can be the bane of your existence—especially when you’re out riding. Do you feel like you hit every single traffic light while you’re on your way somewhere ? Or do you feel like that pesky traffic signal just simply doesn’t see you at all? We at AMERiders give you a few tips to help you fix it.

It’s super frustrating, because there you are, riding your bike, probably enjoying your day. It doesn’t matter if you’re on your way somewhere specific, or if you’re just out for a fun weekend jaunt and exploring some great routes wherever you live. Either way, you’re there, aren’t you? So why the hell don’t those signals always see you?

How Traffic Signal Sensors Work (In The US)

Some of you inevitably know the answer, but for those who might not, traffic signals in the US primarily work using inductive loop detectors, or ILDs. If you’ve ever noticed those weird cuts in the roadway up toward the stop line, that are usually in either a circle or square shape, that’s the big wire loop with sensors for each direction of traffic at that intersection. They’re usually installed about two to four inches beneath the road surface. 

Since you can see them, you can more easily position yourself to take advantage of them if you know how they work— and if they’re calibrated to sense your bike in the first place. Conductive material, such as steel, is what tells those sensors a vehicle is there. 

Of course, that all depends on you knowing that they’re there in the first place. Since you ride a motorcycle, you’re probably more observant than a lot of car drivers. After all, you kind of have to be if you want to stay alive and make good decisions based on how other road users are misbehaving around you.

Cars have an advantage not because they weigh more, but because their conductive bits physically cover a larger area than that of bikes. As a result, they’re more likely to trigger those wire loop sensors. If there’s a car around, you might be able to wave it up so that the sensors can detect it—provided the driver understands what you’re trying to get them to do. Otherwise, you might be SOL.

That Sucks, But What Can I Do About It?

You can try mounting a magnet down low on your frame if your bike regularly has trouble triggering sensors, which can help. It’s no guarantee, but a little trial and error with where you mount it might also be in order.

Individual towns usually decide the sensitivities of traffic light sensors within their borders. If you notice that one particular traffic light that you always hit on your way to work never, ever sees you, you could take it up with your local government. Once again, your results may vary. 

Apart from the problem of simple laziness, setting the sensitivity too high can apparently run the risk of false triggers for the light, according to the Federal Highway Administration. Additional adjustments—and perhaps some allowance for trial and error—might be necessary to get the sensor settings dialed in just right.

traffic signal
Two FHWA engineers discuss sensor settings at a junction box prior to running tests at a TFHRC research intersection to determine whether the sensor is detecting small vehicles like bicycles and motorcycles.

Some states also have laws in place that allow you to legally run a red light if certain very specific conditions are met, as an attempt to get around signals that might not sense your bike. A handy roundup of states that allow this from Business Insider is a few years old, so you might want to double-check your state’s current laws, just to be safe.

Some states have passed “safe on red” laws that allow motorcyclists to legally drive through red lights, to help alleviate the aggravation of being stuck at a traffic light that takes an excruciating amount of time — what feels like hours — to turn green.

Finally, some traffic signals in large metropolitan areas work on timers, so they’ll eventually turn green and aren’t as much of a problem for bikes if you’re patient. There may also be other ways that traffic signals are actuated in other countries—if you have one, please tell us about it!

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the dreaded and pesky traffic signal and how to fix them.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Could A New Liner Technology Become the Future for the Helmet Liner?

Could This New Technology Be the Future for Motorcycle Helmet Liners? If it is it could mean a Safer, more efficient helmet liner, AMERiders is all for that.

While today’s helmets are more efficient than they’ve ever been since we started protecting our noggins, the technology to protect our grey matter never ceases to improve. Expanded polystyrene has become the material of choice for impact absorption, but new technologies are emerging.

From fluid pads to Multi-directional Impact Protection System (MIPS), the evolution of helmet technology never ends. The next big thing in head protection could become Koroyd tubes. 

The technology itself has been around for a few years now, initially documented in bicycle helmets. Koroyd uses tiny plastic tubes rather than foam to absorb impacts. The straw-like tubes are thermowelded to one another in a honeycomb pattern. The polymer material used in the manufacturing of the tubes is thinner than an inflated bead of polystyrene, which leaves more space for air—the main player in shock absorption in helmets. The walls of the tubes have a thickness of 0.09mm and the diameter of the tubes themselves ranges between 3 and 6mm. The thickness of the protector and size of the tubes vary with the application and the type of helmet.

Instead of the expanded beads of polystyrene getting squished under an impact, the tubes absorb energy by crumpling, meaning a certain quantity of air remains in the tubes even after an impact. This results in a more consistent efficiency during an impact. Koroyd is able to absorb more energy, more consistently. 

In addition, the higher compression rate helps reduce the risks of a fracture. Because the protective layer is able to absorb more energy, it also reacts better to different types of impacts (direct or angled) and reduces the rotational momentum of a head impact. 

Also, instead of banking on a very sudden (and often violent) deceleration like with EPS—which may cause the brain to shift inside the head—Koroyd’s impact absorption allows the material to cause a smoother deceleration for a prolonged period of time. 

Bonus: in the case of small impacts, the tubes are even able to bounce back, meaning the protective material doesn’t lose its integrity. Read: there’s a chance you wouldn’t need to replace your helmet after a small hiccup—the material is flexible enough not to be damaged in a small impact scenario.  

Ultimately, the tiny polymer tubes are also more resistant to wear than EPS (no evaporating glues or materials affected by sweat and body oils) and therefore more durable, lighter, and create a far more breathable protective barrier with plenty of airflow. Until now, Koroyd has been used mainly in bicycle helmets, but the Klim F5  Koroyd (launched last year) adventure helmet is now offered with the new technology. 

The technology currently costs more than the production of EPS foam which is why the technology isn’t as widespread as it could be. That being said, there is at least one Koroyd-equipped motorcycle helmet out there you can get your hands on at the moment—the Klim F5 Koroyd comes in at $650 and uses both the Koroyd layering as well as the MIPS technology. If the company’s claims are accurate, this could be the safest motorcycle helmet out there.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Mistakes

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Koroyd technology.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.


Get off the Phone Because I’m Sorry Isn’t Good Enough! Words from Icons.

Dear cagers, get off your damn phone. Love, everybody, especially motorcyclists. This message is simple, and it’s being hammered home by a rider from Arvada, Colorado.  Nathan Maes was riding his Kawasaki on a normal day when the driver behind failed to notice that Maes was slowing for a red light. AMERiders gives you the interview and story and then a few words from some icons in the industry.

“It was just, like green confetti, everywhere,” said Maes, who was slammed into the back of a pick-up truck after the impact from the texting driver, before he was able to get to his feet. His Kawasaki Ninja 650 was totaled.

Police in Colorado charged the driver with careless driving, but despite an admission from the driver that he was texting, cannot charge him with texting while driving. That’s because, in Colorado, police have to actually witness the crash in order to charge someone under the state’s distracted driving laws. “He said, ‘You know, I was just looking at my phone for two seconds, I was just sending a quick text,’” Maes said in an interview with local news.

This story comes as distracted driving and general poor behavior on the roads is on the increase. Deaths caused by drivers who went through red lights hit a 10-year high last year, and many believe this is because of distracted drivers, who miss a red light while texting. A Canadian study found that in 2016 more people were killed or injured by distracted driving than any other infringement, including speeding and driving under the influence.

There are things we can do motorcyclists to mitigate the risks that distracted driving poses. Maes says he was looking in the rearview mirror but couldn’t avoid being struck. We should always be watching our mirrors when braking for any reason, and always line up towards the edge of the lane we’re in. That way, we have an escape path if we notice that a car behind is not going to stop in time.

No amount of risk mitigation and road positioning can change this one simple fact: Drivers who use their cell phones while behind the wheel can and do kill people. So, please, for the love of all that is good and right in the world, put your phone down.

Now Words from our Icons.

Public safety films are amazing time capsules sometimes, but they rarely feature motorcycling icons like Peter Fonda and Evel Knievel. If you’ve never seen the short film Not So Easy, you’re in for a treat that’s surprisingly not as dated as you might expect.

Clearly, both motorcycle safety and riding skills have come a long way since this film’s 1973 release. Bikes and safety gear technology have both greatly advanced. Unfortunately, the number of things that make other road users—especially car drivers—take their eyes off the road have increased over time, as well.

Knievel’s advice that you should a) be ATGATT ( all the gear all the time ) and b) familiarize yourself with any new-to-you bike you hop on is timeless. Likewise, Fonda’s admonition that, “For some reason, most car drivers just don’t seem to see bikes, so you’ve got to think of them as asleep, blind, or drunk,” is, unfortunately, an eternal truth. So, why Evel Knievel and Peter Fonda? They would totally rally behind the “don’t text and drive crusade” I don’t like it either.

Well, as for Fonda—once Easy Rider put him on the map, he said he never lacked for work. That’s a plus when you’re obsessed with motorcycles, as he was—it was never just an acting job for him, it was a true and lifelong passion. He passed away at the age of 79 earlier this year, which is, quite coincidentally, the same age that Not So Easy director Cliff ‘Soney’ Vaughs was when he passed a few years back. 

As for Knievel, could there be a more appropriate ambassador for motorcycle safety from the early ‘70s? I mean, the man suffered enough bone fractures in his life that no one could quite agree on how many breaks he’d suffered, according to the Billings Gazette. More to the point, he lived to talk about them later—so clearly, even wearing gear of the time made a huge difference.

All three of these legends are remembered fondly—and with constant rediscoveries of videos like these, their legacies live on forever.

Stuff to remember!!!

With all this said AMERiders reminds you to Stay off the phone while your driving… PERIOD… Texting, Talking anything. It takes your attention off the road, plus your reaction time is slower as well. Most phones have a driving setting on them now. If you need to use the phone pull over. It may save not only a motorcyclists life but if you hit another cager it could save yours as well.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

AMERiders reminds you to Get off the Phone Because I’m Sorry Isn’t Good Enough! and leaves you with some Words from motorcycle Icons.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Indian Motorcycles Gives Us Two New Models for the 2020 Scout Lineup

Indian Motorcycle is celebrating 100 years of the Scout in 2020, which is a milestone not many motorcycle companies have been able to reach. For the occasion, the company gives us two new models for the 2020 Scout Lineup to highlight the jubilee.  AMERiders shows you what they look like.

2020 Scout

We actually had a hunch they were coming. As we documented Wed, two new “100th-anniversary” editions of the Scout were listed in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) filings. It was a very obvious hint at the addition of the celebratory editions of the model to the upcoming lineup.

Indian has now confirmed our suspicions with the official launch of its 2020 Scout lineup—including the limited-edition Scout 100th Anniversary and the all-new Scout Bobber Twenty. “100 years is an incredibly special milestone, and it made perfect sense to honor Scout’s history and legacy with these two heritage-inspired 2020 models,” commented Reid Wilson, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle.

Indian has now confirmed our suspicions with the official launch of its 2020 Scout lineup—including the limited-edition Scout 100th Anniversary and the all-new Scout Bobber Twenty. “100 years is an incredibly special milestone, and it made perfect sense to honor Scout’s history and legacy with these two heritage-inspired 2020 models,” commented Reid Wilson, Vice President for Indian Motorcycle.

Gallery: 2020 Indian Scout 100th Anniversary

The Scout 100th Anniversary sports a livery inspired by the original 1920 Scout—the dark red paint decorated with golden pinstripes and accents. Other features of this special edition include 100th Anniversary badging, a tan leather saddle, the black spoke wheels, a braced handlebar, luggage racks and of course, plenty of chrome to check out your reflection in. Only 750 units of the 100th Anniversary will be produced worldwide. Pricing has been set at $15,999—not the most expensive limited edition we’ve seen. 

Gallery: 2020 Indian Scout Bobber Twenty

  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout
  • 2020 Scout

The Scout Bobber Twenty is officially part of the 2020 lineup—no limited numbers on this one like with the 100th Anniversary. The Twenty—for nineteen twenty—is a bit of a different homage to the Scout, taking the bobber style a step further down memory lane. The model is offered in your choice of black, metallic red or matte forest green livery. The standard model is available with ape hangers, a brown leather floating saddle, spoke wheels, and blacked-out exhaust tips. A collection of accessories allows you to modify the look of the bike slightly with the addition of more chrome surfaces. The Bobber Twenty is offered standard (non-ABS) at $11,999 or with ABS at $12,899.

The Bobber Twenty, which is meant to evoke the original 1920 G-20 Scout, a model later made famous by land speed racer Burt Munro — the subject of the film The World’s Fastest Indian.

Both special edition models share the exact same platform and engine as the standard Scout—the classic 1,133 cc V-twin—so no changes here. 

Of course, the three Scout models we’re already familiar with are also returning for 2020, clad in a new choice of colors. All three versions of the Scout receive a few minor upgrades including new floating brake discs, calipers, and master cylinder. The Bobber lineup also receives a set of Pirelli MT60RS tires and the Scout, a new sport seat and passenger footpegs. 

Pricing for the 2020 model-year lineup remains unchanged from 2019. The baby Scout Sixty comes in at $8,999 and is offered in a choice of black, burgundy, or pearl white color schemes. The Scout Bobber is priced at $10,999 with a choice of five liveries: Thunder Black, Thunder Black Smoke, Deepwater Metallic, Bronze Smoke and White Smoke. Finally, the Scout remains set at $11,499 and is offered in a choice of five colors: Thunder Black, White Smoke, Deepwater Metallic, Metallic Jade over Thunder Black and Indian Motorcycle Red over Ivory Cream with Gold Pinstripe. Note that all the non-ABS versions of the Scout will be available in Thunder Black only, including the Bobber Twenty. 

To allow buyers to personalize their Scout and improve their bike’s versatility, Indian also launches a collection of accessories that includes new exhaust and muffler options that improve the bikes’ performance, a quick-release fairing, a solo luggage rack and rack bag, semi-rigid saddlebags, a rider comfort seat, bar-end mirrors, tinted windshield, different handlebars, and much more. 

The new Scout lineup is now up for grabs, including the two new special editions. 

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Two New 2020 Scout Models.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.


2020 Brings About the Indian Scout 100th Anniversary & Special Editions

The year 2020 will set a number of milestones in the motorcycle industry. Aside from the flock of new models we’re expecting to kickstart the new decade, 2020 will also mark a turning point in emission standards with the official implementation of the Euro 5 regulations. At Indian’s, there’s, of course, the Challenger expected to make its debut in the upcoming months. There is also a very special anniversary that’s about to be celebrated: the Scout will turn 100 and the company has every intention of celebrating.  AMERiders gives you a bit of information on Indian Scout 100th Anniversary.

Scout 100th Anniversary
All new 100th anniversary scout

In fact, according to the latest California Air Resources Board (CARB) executive orders, Indian is preparing one, maybe even two, special-edition Scouts for the model’s jubilee. The document lists an Indian Scout 100th Anniversary—likely the very same one spotted at the dealers’ meeting earlier this month. The special model will sport the original, classic Scout look with the deep red livery and yellow pinstripes. Some sources also suggest that the Scout Bobber Twenty (for 1920) listed in the document is also meant as a celebratory edition of the model’s history. 

I don’t know about you but those sound really pretty and I would love to own one, but my garage isn’t big enough nor do I make enough.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Indian Scout 100th Anniversary.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.