Let’s Talk Harley-Davidson Custom Paint Sets for Performance Riders

I figured since we were talking custom bikes earlier this week lets talk custom paint and HD has started us off with that, and we at AMERiders will give you an explanation.

In its crusade to contemporize, Harley-Davidson just announced two custom paint accessory lines for 2020. The Quick Shift and Mayhem Limited Paint Sets are bolt-on, limited-edition paint schemes for 2018-later Breakout and Fat Bob, and 2017-later Road Kings, Street Glides, and Road Glides. Geared toward performance-minded riders, the paint sets promote a new direction for the historically traditional manufacturer.  

custom paints
Quick Shift Limited Series Paint Set

The Quick Shift edition sports a gunmetal metallic and vivid black base with pewter pinstripes across the fuel tank, front fender, and rear fender. Owners can customize the design with hyper orange, hyper yellow, or hyper green accents. 

Quick Shift will be extremely limited with only 100 available worldwide and a price point of $1,699-$3,099. For those riders looking to stand out among their friends, this option presents a modern aesthetic that resembles the multi-paneled Club Style paint jobs popular in the Harley performance and stunt riding circles. The metal-tones with highlighter accents are also reminiscent of Matt Laidlaw’s recent Coast Glide builds. 

Custom Paint
Mayhem Limited Edition Paint Scheme

For the Touring models, the Mayhem series includes custom-painted CVO Rear Fender and lighting, front fender, stretched saddlebags, side covers, chin spoiler, gas tank, and upper fairing, depending on your model. The kits will run between $6099-$7099. 

“The Mayhem Limited Paint Set embodies the feeling of speeding away from the everyday noise, through its Inferno red pearl and phantom black base and its ghost-white with brushed silver highlights that accelerate from the front to the back of the bike,” Harley-Davidson said in a press release. “The performance-inspired number one logo set within the deep charcoal on the saddlebags gives a subtle nod to Harley-Davidson racing heritage.”

The Mayhem line captures the bold graphics and aggressive styling that’s emerging in the performance bagger scene. With Sturgis underway, the Motor Company couldn’t have picked a better time to introduce custom liveries to their catalog.

If the Mayhem or Quick Shift sets are installed at a certified Harley-Davidson dealership within 60 days of purchasing a new Fat Bob, Breakout, Road King, Street Glide, or Road Glide, the parts are covered under the extended limited two-year warranty of the vehicle.

It’s no secret that Harley-Davidson has struggled to attract newer, younger riders in recent years. That said, the Limited Paint Sets show that Harley is listening to its customer base and observing aftermarket trends. You may not associate the brand with performance motorcycles but they’re aiming to change that perception in the near future.

Don’t know about you but I think those are some really pretty colors right there and they have some new bikes models coming up too. We here at AMERiders are loving those and we will get to those soon.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on the new Harley-Davidson Custom Paint Sets.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Love Custom Motorcycles? Then Check out This Motorcycle Road Show!

We all know that the Motorcycle World is famous for its Custom Motorcycles. Especially with the Custome Motorcycle Shows that have been on TV. I am not going to name any of them because they are not paying me too, plus there isn’t one that I like more than the other so I don’t want one getting pissy that they didn’t get blog time and another didn’t so pfft. But AMERiders just loves a Custom Motorcycle and someone pointed us to this The 2019 Handbuilt Motorcycle Show.

Custom Motorcycles

But before I bust into telling you about these awesome motorcycles let me remind you about something first. It is well into the 79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally and if you aren’t there check out the Webcams to see what is going on at the link below.

Sturgis Webcam Link

The Handbuilt Motorcycle Show, now in its sixth year, has become one of the most influential custom shows in the US. It started as part of Portland’s The One Motorcycle Show and now is a large show entirely on its own. Not only that it uniquely encapsulates its home city of Austin, Texas. Right smack dab in the center of the show is one shop, Revival Cycles. It builds wild and beautiful custom models built in its Texas workshop, all the while pushing its show to be the best it can be.

Craig Rodsmith’s front-wheel-drive “The Killer” on display with other customs brought out from the Haas Museum.

Custom Motorcycles

There were several themes that could be traced through this year’s Handbuilt Show: unpainted bikes with raw or polished metal exteriors, two-strokes, and, of course, trackers. There were choppers, vintage restorations, some wild trikes, and drag bikes, but the majority of bikes were function-focused and seemed to be very rideable. Builds blending high-performance parts with show-bike aesthetics were around every corner.

Beautiful lobster-scale welds on One-Up Motorcycles’ custom BMW R65.

custom motorcycles

Beautiful lobster-scale welds on One-Up Motorcycles’ custom BMW R65

David Mucci of Moto-Mucci has a way of making every custom build look like a factory-funded concept. This KTM 300 custom is no different.

The Haas Moto Museum, known for snatching up some of the most well-known and exotic custom motorcycles of the last decade, brought out a handful of said motorcycles to be displayed in its own section near the show’s entrance, immediately setting the tone as patrons walked through the doors.

The titanium framed Birdcage built by Revival Cycles around a prototype BMW R18 engine.

Moto Guzzi, Indian Motorcycle, and BMW were all sponsors of the show as well, but it was the German motor company that really stole the show with its BMW prototype-based build “The Birdcage,” built by Revival Cycles.

The titanium framed Birdcage

The Birdcage, inspired by the Maserati Tipo 61, is based around the same BMW prototype engine that Custom Works Zon built on to win Best in Show at the Mooneyes Yokohama Show—the R18. This massive air-cooled powerplant is not only daunting because of its size, but because of the importance and secrecy of working around an unreleased BMW motor. We don’t have any details on this engine yet but hope to soon, as BMW continues to hint at real concepts and a production model.

“The FrankenBlast” Buell Blast by DesmoBIBU

custom motorcycles

The Buell Motorcycle Company had a very tumultuous story that ended with the brand’s dissolution under the Harley-Davidson umbrella. Still, they made some very impressive bikes that found new life after Buell’s demise – most notably the Magpul Ronin 47 series of bikes. The Buell Blast, however, was a significantly subdued and short-lived offering from the brand. But it’s potential has finally been unlocked in the ‘Franken-Blast’ custom build by DesmoBIBU.

Hiconsumption gives us our little read in above.

Vlad Sarlau from Riders DriveMag gives us the story of how the Franken-Blast was constructed.

A Yamaha XS650

custom motorcycles

This Yamaha XS650 built by father-daughter team Sofi and George Tsingos.

A TZ750

custom motorcycles

Jeff Palhegyi’s TZ750 four-cylinder two-stroke flat-track racer.

A Triumph Chopper

custom motorcycles

Hand-engraved scrollwork and cutaway sections on a beautiful Triumph chopper.

An immaculate Harley-Davidson Knucklehead restoration among the custom builds.

custom Motorcycles

“The Six” wild Honda CBX custom built by Revival Cycles and brought out as part of the Haas Moto Museum exhibit.

“The Bullet Bob Special,” custom RD400 built by Jared Morris to honor his late father.

From vintage racebikes to dirt bikes, two-stroke machines were a welcome theme at this year’s show.

custom Motorcycles

Forced induction and a monoshock, Harley-Davidson Sportsters continue to be a platform pushed beyond their limits at nearly every custom show.

Gregor Halenda’s custom airhead adventure build with stunning handmade bodywork.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on Sweet Custom Motorcycles.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

It’s Here!! Opening Day of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally!!

It’s Here!! Opening Day of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally!! Who is excited as we are here at AMERiders we hope you are. 10 Days of riding, fun, food, and music! Now, who could not love that? Well, the people who do don’t know what they are missing.

2019 is the Year of the Ride!

Opening Day of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally!! With rides Sturgis has said that this is …

Opening Day

The Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™ Events Team is proud to bring rally-goers the opportunity to go on some guided rides that most people don’t know about and don’t get the opportunity to do.

From trail rides off the beaten path to guided tours that hit some hidden gems that only the locals know about, there is sure to be something for everyone.

Today’s ride was

Ride with a Local

Opening Day

August 2, 6 & 9, 2019 – Choose the date that fits your schedule.

~ All bikes are welcome! ~

Are you a first timer to the Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally© or just want to see things from a local’s point of view? Let us take the hassle out of learning the Black Hills on your own and join us for a “Ride with a Local”.

Bring your bike….all are welcome and join our friendly guides who have been in the Black Hills for years and know their way around.  They will show you the sights and delights that the Black Hills of South Dakota has to offer.

This ride will take you to…[ CLICK FOR MORE ]

Concerts starting today!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sturgis 2018 Weekend

We gave you a list of what was starting today a few days ago well here it is again. Plus a few big names over the next few days as well.

Aug 2ndTimeBand PlayingVenue of Concert
1:00pm-4:00pm Eskimo Brothers Harley Davidson Rally Point
5:00pm-8:00pm Zeona Road Harley Davidson Rally Point
6:00pm Palisades Iron Horse Saloon
8:00pm From Ashes
to New
Iron Horse Saloon
10:30 Hinder Iron Horse Saloon
10:30-12:00 Skid Row Buffalo Chip
Aug 38:30pm- 9:45pm  George Thorogood & The Destroyers Buffalo Chip
10:30pm-12:00am Keith Urban Buffalo Chip
Aug 410:30pm-12:00am GodSmack Buffalo Chip

Check it out live

The Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™ is the world’s largest motorcycle rally and even if you can’t make the trip, make sure to check out the excitement and energy of the Rally and downtown Sturgis via our web cameras. Our webcams capture Sturgis year-round and are strategically placed to give you a bird’s eye view of everything going on in Sturgis.

The cameras at CIty of Riders Headquarters and on the 1200 block of Main Street show the exhilaration of Main Street. Cameras at the City of Riders Motorcycle Expo lots and at the Sturgis Liquor Store capture Lazelle Street and these important off-Main Street locations. Although nothing is the same as being here in Sturgis during the Rally and hearing the rumble of motorcycles going by, these web cameras are a way to check out the Rally. It will make you want to come next year! 

Check out the cameras from the link below

https://www.sturgismotorcyclerally.com/webcams/

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date on Opening Day of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally!!.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

More Sturgis Rally News for You Today and It Is Some Interesting Stuff

AMERiders has found you some more Sturgis Rally News for you today and it is some interesting stuff. You won’t believe your eyes on some of it. Let’s take a peek, shall we?

What we already told you…

Sturgis® always has great things going on when the rally starts up and that is going to be no exception this year starting on Friday, August 2nd. First, off I already told you last week that the Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™ is Boasting 250 Concerts in 10 Days << click that link and see what concerts are coming to Sturgis® and the Surrounding Areas!

Next up: Opening Ceremonies

Here is some cool Sturgis Rally News for you… During the Opening Ceremonies, Cole Freeman will attempt to jump over Sturgis’s Legendary Main Street. Here is more information for you:

Cole will be bringing his show to the 79th Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™ August 2nd at 4:00 p.m. when he will attempt to jump over Sturgis’s Legendary Main Street as part of the year’s opening ceremonies.  It’s free and fun and will be a spectacular sight to see.

Sturgis Rally News

Cole Freeman of Saint Louis Missouri travels the world thrilling spectators like a legend from the past. His adrenaline-fueled, fast-paced riding style is taking the sport to a new level. Many of the stunts that Cole dares to attempt have never been tried and most of them, for good reason. In the most recent feat, Cole jumped a Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ninety Nine Feet Ten Inches shattering his ramps, bike, and the record. Cole is on a mission to keep the industry thriving through extreme entertainment while paying homage to his childhood hero Evel Knievel.

Easy Rider- Saturday, August 3rd

One of the most iconic movies to bikers is the Easy Rider Film and the Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™ announces that the Movie Easy Rider will be shown on Saturday, August 3rd at Harley-Davidson Rally Point.   This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the movie’s release.  On Saturday, August 3rd during the Sturgis®Motorcycle Rally™ at 9:30 p.m. the movie will be shown for a free public viewing.  Harley-Davidson Rally Point is on the corner of Harley-Davidson Way and Legendary Main Street.  Bring a date and enjoy one of the most iconic motorcycle movies that defined a culture.  See you there!

17th Annual Sturgis® Mayor’s Ride

Sturgis Rally News

The next bit of Sturgis Rally News for you is about the 17th Annual Sturgis Mayor’s Ride, not only that it is really cool news too… The ride is on the 5th of August in case you didn’t know but you must have been registered by July 31st to have been entered into the drawing. But as of this moment that I am typing this, there are Ride slots available.

Michael Ballard and Jesse James Dupree from the Full Throttle Saloon and Pappy Hoel Campground have been named Co-Grand Marshals of the City of Sturgis 17th Annual Sturgis Mayor’s Ride this year. Here is what Jesse James announced …

Mike Ballard announced something similar just the guitar is a bit different. “It’s an iconic ride and it has been growing every year, so this is a real honor,” said Ballard.  “And this year is the 20th anniversary of the Full Throttle Saloon, so the timing could not be better.”

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Sturgis Rally News

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on your Sturgis Rally News.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Pack Your Dancin’ Shoes Sturgis Music Concerts Are Gonna Be a Blast!

Your feet will be sore as Sturgis boasts of 250 concerts in 10 days, so pack your dancin’ shoes and pick the ones you want to go too as we all know that Sturgis® Music Concerts are a Blast. The Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™ is home to 10 days and nights of some of the best music in the country. From local, home-grown bands to up-and-coming regional acts to full-blown, national concerts, Sturgis® has them all!  We at AMERiders, as usual, give you a shortlist of the bands that will be there this year and on what days this isn’t a full list you can get that here and download it in the middle of that page…

Sturgis® Music Concerts

Below are a few of the bands listed for August 2nd opening day of Sturgis. We will let you know there are a few bands that play the day before just to keep you entertained as you roll in But the major Sturgis® Music Concerts don’t start happening till August 2nd. (Note: this is not the full 8/2 list)

 
8/2TimeBand PlayingVenue of Concert
1:00pm-4:00pm Eskimo Brothers Harley Davidson Rally Point
5:00pm-8:00pm Zeona Road Harley Davidson Rally Point
6:00pm Palisades Iron Horse Saloon
8:00pm From Ashes
to New
Iron Horse Saloon
10:30 Hinder Iron Horse Saloon
10:30-12:00 Skid Row Buffalo Chip
5:00pm Smoke House The Knuckle Saloon
9:00pm Garage Boys The Knuckle Saloon
8pm-10pm Jered Blake
(country act
from
the Voice)
Loud American- Jack Daniels
Stage Inside
Picture courtesy of the Buffalo Chip

Although there are around 250 bands playing in 10 days the big buzz that has been going off about the Sturgis® Music Concerts is that Snoop Dogg has been added to this year’s list of concerts. Snoop Dogg will make his motorcycle rally debut on the Sturgis Buffalo Chip’s Wolfman Jack Stage on Wednesday, Aug. 7. Many have already reserved passes in order to experience this performance, and this show is the real deal.

Snoop makes his Sturgis Debut at the Buffalo Chip alongside bands and artists such as Skid row, Keith Urban, George Thorogood, and The Destroyers, Godsmack, Styx, Collective Soul, Dee Snider, Toby Keith and many more.

Sturgis 2018 Weekend

We know that everyone is ready to have fun at Sturgis® Music Concerts this year and we can’t wait to peruse the rest of the list ourselves to see what is there and let you know.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Sturgis® Music Concerts.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Are You Pumped and Ready for This Years 79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally?

Are You Pumped and Ready for This Years 79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally? We at AMERiders know we are and as usual, we’re gonna give you info on what’s to come. ( Just an FYI it is 8days and 12 hours and counting at the time I wrote this blog. Not when it was posted) The Rally starts on August 2nd and runs to Augst 11th.

79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally
picture courtesy of Jim Kent of NPR

The legendary Sturgis Motorcycle Rally has been known to draw bikers to South Dakota from around the world. Along the sidewalks, you will see all types of Vendors hawking their wares. This includes everything from biker gear, tattoos, and the obligatory rally t-shirts. Harleys and Hondas are parked along the side entrances to the many bars and restaurants.

The traffic on the roads recently has been pretty light compared to the past when rowdy bikers were backed up at four-way stop signs for a city block.

Sturgis has stated that

79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

“2019 is the Year of the Ride! The Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™ Events Team is proud to bring rally-goers the opportunity to go on some guided rides that most people don’t know about and don’t get the opportunity to do.”

There are at least 6 major rides that Sturgis has each year and there are some that will be hosted around it or “too” it like the one we wrote about last week the “Veterans Therapy Ride” These rides include:

The Good Ride

79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally
August 04, 2019

Good Ride is a motorcycle charity ride that focuses on what motorcycles are all about – getting out on the open road with your friends and checking out new destinations – all for good causes.

Good Ride is a 501(c)(3) charity that was started by freestyle motocross rider, turned street bike builder and hooligan racer, Carey Hart that focuses on key charities close to Carey’s heart. The intention of Good Ride is to give back while doing what he loves to do – ride motorcycles!

We are proud to continue our work with Infinite Hero, a military charity that gives back 100%. Proceeds from our Good Ride rallies will go directly to helping veterans in need.

This ride is for ANYONE who loves to ride motorcycles and raise money for a good cause.

Register here

17th Annual Sturgis Mayor’s Ride

August 05, 2019

Jack Daniel’s and the City of Sturgis® are excited to be hosting the 17th annual Sturgis® Mayor’s Ride during the 79th Annual Sturgis® Motorcycle Rally™! This ride has been a special part of the Sturgis® Rally; not only for the amazing beauty of the Black Hills but that it brings people together from all over the world….and brings them back year after year! Proceeds from the ride will to our emergency services, supporting the men & woman who dedicate so much Rally week to give aid and keep us safe.

Must be registered by July 31st to be entered into the drawing. Register Now

Enjoy a beautiful ride through the Black Hills led by Sturgis® Mayor Carstensen along with the Rally’s Grand Marshal,(TBD). We will stop at Crazy Horse Memorial for a break and photo with the memorial in the background and conclude our ride at the State Game Lodge in Custer State Park with lunch and a presentation with Mayor Carstensen.

Participants will receive a souvenir pack including a limited edition decanter signed by the Mayor, a 2019 Challenge Coin and other collectibles provided by our sponsors. (Shirt size not guaranteed after June 7)

Please register today to guarantee your spot; only 150 spaces available. Must be 21 or older to participate.

Check-in starts at 6:30 am with kickstands up at 9:00 am at the back parking lot of the Community Center located at 1401 Lazelle St.

Register Now

Experience Some Incredible Rides

79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

The 79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally is back and while it is fun it is important not to forget first and foremost to gear up to properly to ride! As we prepare for our wild adventures in the Black Hills, we’ve created you a wonderful list of incredible places to ride while experiencing the thrills of the 79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally:

 Iron Mountain Road

Iron Mountain Road

This 17-mile stretch through the Black Hills is filled with curves, switchbacks, and tunnels. Winding through beautiful mountains and valleys, the road leads to both Mt. Rushmore National Memorial and Custer State Park, two must-see destinations!

Badlands National Park

Badlands National Park

If you love national parks, you definitely need to check out the Badlands! The park is filed with jagged, sharply eroded buttes, a grass prairie and fossil beds—so you can definitely expect to see some unique and spectacular scenery!

Bear Butte State Park

A buffalo standing in the middle of the road with motorcyclist stopped around it

Highway 79 will take you from Sturgis to Bear Butte State Park, which features an enormous laccolith. This ride is often relaxing and revitalizing, allowing you to take in all of the natural beauty of the area. There’s also a pretty good chance you’ll see herds of roaming buffalo!

Don’t Miss out on all the action and we will have more information coming for you on Friday and including next week and when Sturgis starts as well.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the 79th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Veterans’ Therapy Ride to Sturgis Supported by Indian Motorcycles Again.

With Sturgis just two weeks or so away charities are getting underway with their rides and other festivities for it. One is the VCR or the Veteran’s Charity Ride. The Veterans’ Therapy Ride to Sturgis is being supported by Indian Motorcycles again, this year. This will make it the 5th year in a row that manufacturer has sponsored this ride. AMERiders would like to give you a bit of information on it.

The Veterans Charity Ride (VCR) supports veterans of the United States armed forces through motorcycle therapy. Those of us who ride motorcycles know what a joy the ride itself can be and good that it does our own minds and emotions. The VCR puts veterans together to ride motorcycles together which helps them engage in peer mentoring when they are off the bikes which is an important factor.

Therapy Ride
Getting veterans outdoors, feeling the freedom of the open road with the wind in their faces, to clear their heads and talk with one another about their military experiences in a safe environment to promote healing.

For those severely injured and amputee veterans who otherwise would not be able to pilot a two-wheeler, many of the bikes are outfitted with custom Champion sidecars for those programs that VCR works with.

Since the ride will take a little over a week leaving from Salt Lake City and ending in Sturgis, SD in time for the rally there. VCR has organized stops along the way and the cities and towns where the towns are going to welcome and honor them for the sacrifices they have made for our country. I think this is a grand gesture on these town parts.

17 riders will be participating in the therapy ride this year. Eight of them are returning riders who participated last year and will help the new 9 riders that will be riding in the event this year. 4 of the riders are women which is the most this even has had in previous years.

Therapy Ride
They’ll all spend time on the road getting to know each other

During the ride, the veterans will spend time getting to know each other and sharing their stories. We all know that multiple-day motorcycle trips can be a powerful experience. Each time you sit down around a fire or a table with your friends it brings in some good therapy when the day comes to a close. You never know when you share an experience on the road that you may have a similar past experience than your traveling companion. Although Vets do not often talk about their time in war, talking can help them to heal.

“Each year we are touched by the inspiring stories from our veterans and the incredible growth they experience from the Veterans Charity Ride. We’re honored to continue our relationship with Veterans Charity Ride, and proud of the work they do for our veterans.”

Senior Director Reid Wilson, Indian Motorcycles

The Veterans Charity Ride is a non-profit organization. If you’re feeling generous, you may donate to this fantastic cause at the VCR website.

Therapy Ride

Look for our information on Sturgis starting on Wed. of next week.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Mistakes

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Veteran’s Therapy Ride to 2019 Sturgis Rally.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Source: Veterans Charity RideMotorcycle.com 

Review of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire from Two Different Blogging Sites

It is always nice to find out what a first ride review of a motorcycle for a new year is, and the Harley-Davidson LiveWire is no exception. We at AMERiders found not one but two blogging sites that did a first ride review of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and we are going to share their thoughts with you of what they thought about it. Now, we have already given you information about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire a few times, including when it was in the planned production stage. So time to get to work on what is thought of the ride now.

Bradley Brownell of Jalopnik and Jason Marker of RideApart both did first Rides of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire. Both of them had good things to say about the motorcycle and I will go into what they each had to say, on each topic. First, you should know that these rides of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire took place in Portland, OR.

The Ride Itself

So we are gonna start off with a short paragraph each of what they both thought of their ride of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire itself with actual quotes from their blogs so we don’t give you misinformation. Harley-Davidson has this to say about the LiveWire when you ride it? “0 TO 60 IN 3 SECONDS — Get instantaneous power the moment you twist the throttle. No clutch to release. No gears to run through. All you do is flick your wrist and take off. ” What did Bradley and Jason have to say about their Harley-Davidson LiveWire Rides?

Bradley Brownell of Jalopnik courtesy Harley-Davidson

Swing a leg over the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and you’ll instantly feel the crashing waves of a sea change. A magnet inside the motor rocks back and forth to indicate the bike is alive, it feels like a faint heartbeat. It’s a little on-the-nose, but it’s as if this bike is directly channeling the pulse of the industry. Is this the future of riding?

Bradley Brownell of Jalopnik

and

Image courtesy of RideApart

LiveWire is a phenomenal motorcycle, but is it the right motorcycle?
And just like that, the LiveWire and I went face-first into the hedge at full throttle. Now, before we get too far into this, there are two things you should know. One, I had just spent over an hour flogging Harley’s new electric wünderbike through some of the loveliest and most technical roads the Greater Portland Metropolitan Area has to offer and was really feeling myself. Two, there’s no neutral on an electric bike. When active, it’s always armed, as it were. My cockiness high spirits, combined with the LiveWire’s always-on status was a recipe for disaster. Or hilarity. Either one.

Jason Marker of RideApart

They give us a short on how it performs but it sounds like they both wonder if the Harley-Davidson LiveWire is going to be the next bike of the future. Let’s move forward, and see how their ride went and were Harley-Davidson took them on their first ride with the Harley-Davidson LiveWire.

The Ride

What did they both think of their ride well lets find out?

I’ll admit to a slight nervousness when I first climbed aboard the good ship LiveWire. I’d heard horror stories about electric torque catching people off guard and ripping the rear wheel out from under its rider, or aggressive throttle wrist leading to an unintentional wheelie dumping rider off the back. I went the first few blocks with a bit of trepidation, but rapidly adjusted to this new sensation. “Damn,” I thought to myself, “this thing is easy street.”

You wouldn’t think of a 100+ horsepower streetfighter-style sport bike as being docile and friendly. It’s just one way that this bike shirks the norms. With a smooth and fluid delivery, the EV powertrain is a gem that proves its worth immediately. Click the ignition switch to on, retract the sidestand, and you’re ready to roll. There’s absolutely no drama.
When coming to a stop at the first traffic light a block down the road, I find myself dipping a toe at an imaginary shifter and reaching for an absent clutch lever. On the mean streets of distracted drivers and occasionally hellacious traffic, it’s refreshing to know you’re never in the wrong gear. Rear brake. Front brake. Throttle. That’s all you have to worry about. Which is great, because Harley thinks it’s likely that many LiveWire miles will be lived in cities.

It doesn’t take long to notice the sounds surrounding me. Stopped at a traffic light I can hear the conversations of pedestrians over on the sidewalk, and the bass hit of the music playing in the car next to me. We’re riding in a pack with four traditional Harleys—a lead rider on a big bagger and a trio of sweep riders on Sportsters at the back—and their staccato V-twin thumping is comparatively imprudent.

Once out on the back country roads, separated from the ICE bikes a bit, I notice more bird calls. And my own thoughts. I don’t like to be alone with those too long.
The LiveWire isn’t silent. It’s actually got quite a dynamic range of sounds. The most prominent sound is that of the drivetrain’s single spiral bevel gear whine. It’s still eerily quiet, however. Quiet enough that you can hear the belt drive, the tires, the brakes, even the shocks.

I asked a Harley engineer about the 90-degree bevel gear and belt-drive setup employed, and why it was preferable to a simple shaft-drive. The bevel gear was chosen to give the bike that Formula E sound, despite a slight parasitic drain. The belt drive is simply because it’s a Harley staple, having been equipped on the company’s bikes since the ‘80s. And why is the motor longitudinal instead of transverse? To make it an important visual piece of the bike’s design.
I also imagine that if the motor was turned transverse, the bottom of the bike would be much wider. With a longitudinal layout, Harley says the LiveWire’s layover angle is 45 degrees—more than any other HD product—before the foot pegs scrape. I didn’t have a float level on hand to prove that measurement correct, but it felt like plenty of angle to work with.

Point the bike in the direction you want to go and hammer down the throttle, you’re transported through time and space like you just hit a wormhole. It’s not so much the acceleration [with a 0-60 time in the 3-second range] that gets me, it’s the ease with which acceleration happens. There’s no pause to shift, no clutch, no lift, just building speed.

In road or sport modes the regenerative braking is functional, but doesn’t quite replicate the engine braking feel you’re used to on an ICE bike. In “range mode” the brake regen gets more aggro and gets a little bit closer. It’s a new sensation, but if used right, you can hop off the throttle and the bike will whoa perfectly into the corner without pedal or lever.
Ultimately, Harley could have made a recognizable riding experience with an EV drivetrain, but it decided instead to build something in a form factor that doesn’t pay much attention to heritage. It also rides in a decidedly un-Harley way.

Bradley

and

I had just come back from my penultimate photo pass. The route was exhilarating. Turn right out of the staging area, a cozy little joint called the Rock Creek Tavern, on to a long, flat straightaway just over a mile long where you could unwind the LiveWire and get a sense of its power. Then, as quick as you like, get off the throttle, let the regenerative braking haul the bike down to a manageable speed, and ease into the gentle left-hander. Sweep right over the bridge, then hard left to a short uphill straight into the lethal, left-handed, decreasing-radius hairpin where the photographers were camped out. Whip through the hairpin as fast as you can to look your best for the cameras (while trying to ignore them), throttle out, scream up the hill and into one more gentle right-hander, then pull over at the dirt road to wait for the next pass to do it all over again backward. Lather, rinse, repeat.

This thing sounds like a speederbike. It’s awesome.
As I pulled back into the tavern’s parking lot after my sixth pass, I felt like Rennie Goddamned Scaysbrook. Each pass I’d made had been faster and better than the last, every line tighter and truer. I was, in the words of Lightning McQueen, speed. You see where this is going, right? I got into the turnaround at Rock Creek at a bad angle—nose down a little hill and pointed at a hedge separating the parking lot from the property next door. So, like I would with any other bike, I pulled back on the bars to yank the bike’s front end up the hill for a little turnaround. You know, the electric bike, the one with no clutch lever and no neutral. As I pulled back I apparently grabbed a fistful of throttle (apparently, because things get blurry for a few seconds here) and the LiveWire leaped forward like a stung horse.

We probably reached 30 miles-per-hour in the six feet between where we started and where we hit the hedge. I buried the LiveWire in that hedge up to the foot pegs before I had the presence of mind to lay off the throttle and bail out. I was half on the bike, half stuck in the hedge and, after a moment, the bike listed slowly to port and trapped my right ankle. I was immediately rushed by a dozen Harley techs checking to see if I was okay, reassuring me, and tending to the bike—which seemed more freaked out than I was, if the numerous warnings and buzzings and flashing lights on the TFT were any indication. Pride definitely wenteth before the fall. So, yeah. That’s my story of how I crashed a LiveWire into a hedge in front of God and everyone else during a press ride.

Jason

Sounds like they had fun Yeah? Well, both Bradley and Jason also let us know that Harley is taking the Harley-Davidson LiveWire seriously and what they thought of the LiveWire and the future of Harley because of it. As well as some tidbits that CEO Matt Levatich had to say about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire.

Future of Harley-Davidson and their thoughts

The LiveWire is aluminum where the traditional Harleys are iron. It’s a philosophical change from the norm, and hopefully indicative that Harley is taking this bike seriously.
Harley-Davidson CEO Matthew Levatich was keen to harp on the theme that “We build riders” which appears to be a signal that the company is shifting its focus to a younger generation of riders.
As the global population trends toward urban living, Levatich says he wants to focus on meeting the needs of that demo. And electrification is apparently one of the ways to do that.

Harley bills the LiveWire as a halo electric product, and that many more EV models are coming, priced from $1,000 on up to the LiveWire’s $29,799. This bike, and the others on the way, are the backbone of its electric strategy. Levatich continued, “We aim to lead in the electrification of the sport.”
It’s astonishing to me that it wasn’t Honda or BMW that pushed mainstream motorcycle manufacturers into the electric sphere, but good ‘ol Americana Harley-Davidson that took that leap. 

Whether it’s by necessity or by choice doesn’t really matter. If Harley clearly and consistently pushes forward with this strategy and it pays off—if it becomes more than just an expensive halo bike for early adopters—this gamble has the potential to be a product shift on the level of Iaccoca-era Chrysler. Harley has had quality products and failed to deliver before, but I genuinely hope this one succeeds.

My dad, who has had a Heritage Softail for over a decade and recently bought a Tri Glide Ultra, is the guy you see in your mind when you think Harley buyer. His response to the LiveWire? “Wow! I bet that is quick! I need to try one out.”
My barber, the tattooed punk rocker type of vintage Harley rider had a very different response. “Pass. Harley has gotten way off course with their new models. Trying to appeal to the younger generation that are not buying motorcycles at all. Stick with what you know, HD.”
So it might be a mixed bag.

Bradley

and

The LiveWire’s technological innovation doesn’t end at its ability to stop and corner, however. If the Revelation motor is LiveWire’s heart, the powerful, adaptable Reflex Defensive Riding System is its brain. The RDRS is an onboard computer and electronics suite that controls the bike’s high-tech systems and provides numerous rider aids and riding modes to fit any taste or style. It includes a cornering enhanced ABS system, cornering enhanced traction control system, rear wheel lift mitigation, and drag-torque slip control system. That’s a lot of technobabble for what is, essentially, a bunch of sensors and a six-axis inertial measuring unit that help the rider keep the wheels firmly planted on nearly any kind of surface.
All of the bike’s techno-wizardry is controlled through a trick 4.3-inch, full-color TFT display that makes up its gauge cluster and infotainment control system. It’s equipped with an ambient light sensor that adjusts both brightness and contrast (I never had trouble reading the TFT through my polarized visor no matter how bright it was outside) and displays the clock, speed, and idiot lights. It can also cycle through various functions and displays like range, voltage, odometers, etc. As befits a thoroughly modern motorcycle, the TFT is Bluetooth enabled and can sync to iOS or Android devices. The rider can sync up, toss their phone in a pocket, and control everything via the bike’s touch screen. That includes things like displaying turn-by-turn navigation and controlling music and phone calls. Pretty nifty. Sadly, none of the test bikes were set up to actually do this, so I didn’t have a chance to try it out. Hopefully next time.

Of course, since we live in a dystopian, app-driven, subscription-based Cyberpunk hellscape now, the LiveWire is fully cloud-connected and can be controlled and communicated with via the Harley-Davidson App. Called H-D Connect (natch), the app allows a LiveWire owner to connect to their bike and do things like check its settings, charging status, security, etc. Owners can set up push notifications so that the bike alerts them of the current status of the battery, if anyone is dicking around with the bike when they shouldn’t be, and all sorts of things. It’s like a Tesla up in there, seriously. Do we need all this? Maybe. Harley sure thinks we do. I just worry that it’s a bit… much.

Yeah, Well… How Is It?
In a word, the LiveWire rules. It’s a towering technological achievement on Harley’s part, a powerful, aggressive, sporty, comfortable, incredibly fast, and agile electric bike that showcases what can be done with essentially infinite money and a six-year development time. Despite the one little hedge-related hiccup, my time with the LiveWire was amazing. It did everything I asked of it. It attacked every corner eagerly and effortlessly, and the various electronic systems allowed me to push the bike right to the edge of my riding abilities—if not its own prodigious capabilities—without anxiety. I felt like I could count on the bike, like it was there for me. It let me wind it out and never punished me for it.

At speed, LiveWire is a goddamned freight train. It just pulls and pulls and never seems to run out of steam. Roll the throttle on at any speed and the Revelation spools up instantly to rocket you into or out of any situation. Acceleration is like a kick in the ass, and more than once I felt like I was just hanging on while the bike drove instead of actively piloting it myself.
The ergos are fantastic, too. The bike has an aggressive, slightly forward, naked bike seating position with mild rearsets and flat bars. The saddle was surprisingly comfortable for how small it looks, and with the low, low center of gravity, it was flickable at speed and nimble in tight confines. I would have liked the TFT better had it been mounted a little higher, but that’s just me. Also, since the bike doesn’t vibrate or generate tons of wasted heat, LiveWire is super comfortable for the long haul and doesn’t beat you up like other bikes. I was tired at the end of my ride, but a contented tired like from a hard workout. Not a deep, exhausted tired you’d get from, say, wrestling with a hot, loud, vibrating big-twin all day.

As for fit and finish? Well, that’s only mostly great. Everything not part of the handlebar is pretty great. The paint is deep and rich, the surfaces feel good to the touch, and everything fits together seemingly perfectly. The LiveWire wasn’t slapped together at 4:55pm on a Friday and it shows. My biggest gripe is with the switchgear, levers, and mirrors. The switches and binnacles are bog-standard Harley parts bin bits with add-on buttons for the new LiveWire-specific systems. Their layout sucks and is completely counter-intuitive. I eventually just stopped using everything but the turn signals (and even then I had to keep looking for them) because nothing was where it should have been. In addition to the parts bin switches, the mirrors and levers are standard H-D fare, too. Seriously, Harley? Seriously? You’re gonna put the same handlebar controls on your 30K, high-po, hot rod halo bike as the ones I can get on a Sportster? Or on a Street 500? That’s some seriously bad form right there.

Overall, I was deeply impressed with the LiveWire. I did a whole lot of whooping and demented cackling in my helmet as I thrashed it around the twisties outside of Portland. That’s about as good a recommendation as I’ll give any bike. LiveWire is fun. Fun and cool in a way that, in my opinion, many of the Motor Company’s products are not. Is that enough, though?

Jason

So what are the specs of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire? Let’s give you a few bits of what our bloggers said on the specs shall we and what Harley said themselves.

Charging

Charge at home, or use a Level 3 DC Fast Charge station to power up. Harley-Davidson photo.

So what does Harley have to say about their Livewire and it’s Charging?

TWO EASY WAYS TO CHARGE
Use the onboard Level 1 charger and power cord to connect to any standard household outlet and get a full charge overnight. For a faster charge, visit any public DC Fast Charge station for 80% charge in 40 minutes or 100% charge in an hour.

Harley-Davidson

Bradley had a bit to say about the charging let’s see what it was.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire

The battery, or renewable energy storage system in HD parlance, has an impressive 15.5kWh worth of lithium ions onboard. That battery is good for 146 miles in the city, 70 miles on the highway, and 95-ish mixed. You might be able to stretch those numbers if you’re aggressive on the regen.
Then again, if you are hard on acceleration you could suck it dry of electrons in far less. Frequent 0-100 launches? Yeah, that’ll run things down.

LiveWire owners will have their options open when it comes to charging. Harley says most owners will probably treat their bike like a smart phone, plugging it in every night to recharge before using it as an urban/suburban commuter ride. For the ones who want to ride farther and longer, the LiveWire joins Energica in offering DC Fast Charge. You can shove one of those bad boys into the top tank and it’ll fill from zero to 80 percent charge in 40 minutes, and up to 100 percent in one hour, according to Harley. 

Every one of the 150 “Phase One” Harley-Davidson dealerships to get the LiveWire had to install at least one DC Fast Charge station, send at least one of its master certified mechanics for LiveWire-specific maintenance training, and prep its salespeople to answer EV specific questions. As part of this package, LiveWire buyers will be entitled to free charges at all HD dealerships for the first two years.

In addition to the dealer network, Harley has tapped a partnership with Electrify America’s network of fast charge stations. Each LiveWire owner will get free charging up to 500 kilowatt-hours for the first two years of ownership. That equates to about 40 free charges from Electrify America. If you plan your trips right, you’re paying nothing to ride the thing for the first two years.

Bradley

Their last thoughts

What did they like and dislike about the bike?

Likes

Harley-Davidson LiveWire

I truly find this to be a stylish bike. I like the air-cooling fins on the battery, drawing a visual connection between Harleys of old and the company’s EV-inclusive future. The motor slung below the bike is another cool piece of the design, being the only piece in silver makes it an eye catching style point.

The 4.3-inch color TFT touch screen is quite nice to look at. The numbers are crisp and clear, the whole unit is legible and easy to read, and the touch activation works decently even with a gloved hand. Unlike some other bikes I’ve been on, the touch screen is only active when the bike is stationary, but the operation toggles on the right handlebar are perhaps even easier to operate than the touch screen anyway.

You can sync up your cell phone with your bike to control things like music and turn-by-turn directions. The latter of which can be displayed on the screen with a direction arrow, upcoming street name, and distance to turn. Live maps are not compatible with this screen, which is kind of a shame, but it might be too small a screen to accommodate something like that.

The different power delivery modes are fun to play with. If you want to maximize range, you can optimize the bike for maximum regeneration and light acceleration. If you get to a fun road, you can pump both up and hammer down. Figuring out which balance you like best can really help you get the most out of the bike. With built-in Sport Mode, Road Mode, Rain Mode, and Range Mode, you can let the factory figure it out for you, or you can configure three custom modes.

The advanced computers in the LiveWire are above and beyond what you’d expect from the Harley brand. Outside of the different modes, there’s a quite sophisticated traction control and anti-lock braking system with anti-wheelie as well as anti-stoppie. The ABS system has also been pumped up to include information about lean angle when taking brake forces into consideration to keep you upright. There is also a specific system to prevent the regenerative braking from locking up the wheel on wet roads. It’s all seamless, and makes for an engaging ride safer than average.

Bradly

In a word, the LiveWire rules. It’s a towering technological achievement on Harley’s part, a powerful, aggressive, sporty, comfortable, incredibly fast, and agile electric bike that showcases what can be done with essentially infinite money and a six-year development time. Despite the one little hedge-related hiccup, my time with the LiveWire was amazing. It did everything I asked of it. It attacked every corner eagerly and effortlessly, and the various electronic systems allowed me to push the bike right to the edge of my riding abilities—if not its own prodigious capabilities—without anxiety. I felt like I could count on the bike, like it was there for me. It let me wind it out and never punished me for it.

At speed, LiveWire is a goddamned freight train. It just pulls and pulls and never seems to run out of steam. Roll the throttle on at any speed and the Revelation spools up instantly to rocket you into or out of any situation. Acceleration is like a kick in the ass, and more than once I felt like I was just hanging on while the bike drove instead of actively piloting it myself.

The ergos are fantastic, too. The bike has an aggressive, slightly forward, naked bike seating position with mild rearsets and flat bars. The saddle was surprisingly comfortable for how small it looks, and with the low, low center of gravity, it was flickable at speed and nimble in tight confines. I would have liked the TFT better had it been mounted a little higher, but that’s just me. Also, since the bike doesn’t vibrate or generate tons of wasted heat, LiveWire is super comfortable for the long haul and doesn’t beat you up like other bikes. I was tired at the end of my ride, but a contented tired like from a hard workout. Not a deep, exhausted tired you’d get from, say, wrestling with a hot, loud, vibrating big-twin all day.

As for fit and finish? Well, that’s only mostly great. Everything not part of the handlebar is pretty great. The paint is deep and rich, the surfaces feel good to the touch, and everything fits together seemingly perfectly. The LiveWire wasn’t slapped together at 4:55pm on a Friday and it shows. My biggest gripe is with the switchgear, levers, and mirrors. The switches and binnacles are bog-standard Harley parts bin bits with add-on buttons for the new LiveWire-specific systems. Their layout sucks and is completely counter-intuitive. I eventually just stopped using everything but the turn signals (and even then I had to keep looking for them) because nothing was where it should have been. In addition to the parts bin switches, the mirrors and levers are standard H-D fare, too. Seriously, Harley? Seriously? You’re gonna put the same handlebar controls on your 30K, high-po, hot rod halo bike as the ones I can get on a Sportster? Or on a Street 500? That’s some seriously bad form right there.

Overall, I was deeply impressed with the LiveWire. I did a whole lot of whooping and demented cackling in my helmet as I thrashed it around the twisties outside of Portland. That’s about as good a recommendation as I’ll give any bike. LiveWire is fun. Fun and cool in a way that, in my opinion, many of the Motor Company’s products are not. Is that enough, though?

Jason

Dislikes

Friends, I have some seriously mixed feelings about the LiveWire. It’s not the bike itself that’s the problem, though. Like I said earlier, it’s a fantastic achievement and everyone involved with the project should be proud. It’s just… I don’t know. Who the hell is this bike for? During the pre-ride presentation, the presenters told us a whole lot about the marketing and target audience without actually saying anything. Harley claims the LiveWire’s target demographic is “Youngish, wealthy, urban early-adopters who enjoy being on the cutting edge with a highly developed personal style and a desire to be associated with luxury and/or premium brands”. That’s a paraphrase, but you get the gist of it.
I’m going to write a longer opinion piece soon about this whole target demographic situation, but suffice to say that now I’m not sure LiveWire has an audience and I’m not sure it’ll find one. I want the LiveWire to succeed because it deserves it and so does its development team. Will Harley let it succeed is my question. Will the company give the bike the support it needs (and will it give the select dealers who will carry LiveWire the training that they will need to sell it), or will this be a Buell and/or VROD situation all over again? Time will tell, I guess. Until then, let’s wish Harley and LiveWire all the luck in the world, because both are going to need it.

Jason

Outside of the price (more on that later), there is very little to dislike about this EV rider. I really had to grasp at straws to find this short list.
The rear view mirrors are useless for practical purposes. I’m what some would call a big guy, with my suit jackets measured at 54″ at the shoulder, so it’s likely that this has a lot to do with my rearward visibility. Luckily, this can be changed pretty easily with a set of aftermarket mirrors. I’d go for a stylish set of bar-end mirrors and never worry about it again.

While common with sport bikes, it’s worth noting that there is nary a storage space to be found on this bike. You can lift up the seat to reveal a fitted space for your wall charger to slot in, so if you choose not to carry the charger, you can probably fit a few small items in there. It’s not much.

And this problem is exacerbated by the fact that the colored cover on top of the bike, where a fuel tank would be, is made of molded plastic. In the past when I’ve needed to go on a ride while carrying anything, I’ll throw a magnetic tank bag in that space. This is minor from a convenience standpoint, as you can always throw on a backpack, and Harley says it offers plenty of aftermarket storage options that will fit the LiveWire. From a quality standpoint, however, this is the only part of the bike that feels cheaper than it would on a comparable ICE motorcycle.

And the final point I found annoying was an ergonomic issue. While the bike is quite comfortable in riding position, there is a boss around the bolt that holds the battery unit to the frame right about where my legs want to be while stopped at a light or in traffic. It doesn’t seem like it would be a big deal, but after a couple hours of riding, I developed a light bruise on the inside of my thigh just above the knee. Again, I’m bigger than the average rider, but I’m also 6’2″ with a 32″ inseam and think that this would be worse for people any shorter than me.
Value
There is a life cycle for adoption of a new technology which includes a large chasm between early adopters and the majority. The LiveWire feels like it has the potential to bridge that gap and introduce the technology to the mainstream. As electric charging becomes more ubiquitous consumers will adapt to the idea.

The near-$30,000 price tag is going to turn a lot of buyers off. That’s a fact. But there are some who will value the bike as a novelty, a conversation piece, and a historically significant technological touchpoint. In the same way that driving an interesting car has value, so does this bike. Most riders buy a bike because it makes a statement about who they are, it’s an emotional purchase usually devoid of logic.

In that way, if the LiveWire says you’re interesting, environmentally conscious, and maybe a smidge more counterculture than a Tesla owner, maybe you find it valuable.
Beyond just being a thing that people would be interested in seeing at a cars and coffee or at your local bike night, it functions quite well as a motorcycle. This is a quick, fun to ride, competent two wheeler with enough tech baked in to help keep you rubber side down.

And then there are the perks. When you include the unlimited mileage warranty, connectivity package, and years of free charging, it starts to approach feasible. And when you consider most buyers are going to finance or lease something like this anyway, the monthly nut looks easier to crack.

Harley says all current financing offers apply on the LiveWire, so their current 4.49 percent APR for 60 months and $0 down option would get you riding for about $500 a month.
I’m not suggesting this is the right method for you, but I could definitely see the Tesla-buying doctor, lawyer, dentist getting one of these to ship to Daytona, Sturgis, or Reno for a once-a-year two-wheel tryst.

Are supercars overpriced? Are MacBooks overpriced? In the case of the LiveWire, I’d argue that you’re paying for a brand name with at least some prestige, a bike that is packed with quality engineering, and style that will snap necks.
Is it for everyone? Not a chance. But maybe that’s why it’s good.

Bradley

So what do we know and think?

Both bloggers are a bit mixed on the Harley-Davidson LiveWire but it is ultimately going to be the public that decides the fate of the motorcycle itself. It sounds like the Harley-Davidson LiveWire is going to be a fun motorcycle to take a test ride of to me. I do agree with that price 30k is a bit much for a bike. Well, now you know a bit more about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire. What do you think about the Harley-Davidson LiveWire and would you buy it just on this information alone?

If you were to buy one though whats safety gear would you wear with it? Have you thought if you need new gear lately?

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Mistakes

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the Harley-Davidson LiveWire.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

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Fantastic Custom Bikes Built by These Lego Geniuses Are Too Cool.

LEGO is more than just some little colored plastic bricks, as evidenced by these five rad motorcycles built using only LEGO, some inspiration, and a load of talent. On Wednesday, July 10th we showed you that with our post on Lego and Harley’s Team up for the Super Cool Harley Fat Boy Creator Set. Now, we at AMERiders are going to show you can build everything really awesome Lego by showing you these LEGO-based, scale model Fantastic Custom Bikes Built by Lego Geniuses, and might we add they are TOO COOL!!

For those of you who aren’t huge damn nerds may be unaware, building ultra-realistic models with LEGO bricks is really big right now. The internet is awash in AFOLs—real-life Master Builders who call themselves Adult Fans of LEGO—building cars, aircraft, buildings, just about anything they can out of the ubiquitous little plastic bricks. LEGO has come a long way since the days of the castle, the police station, and the space transport. Lines like LEGO Technic and the various licensed lines like Star Wars and Harry Potter, a general modernization of LEGO bricks in general, and a robust aftermarket that provides things like chromed or gold-plated parts have made it possible for a builder to find or buy nearly any part their imagination (and their project) desires. It’s pretty awesome.

So, why are we talking about LEGO bricks on a Motorcycle Blog? If it looks like a Motorcycle and has to do with motorcycle we try to write about it … annnnnd these look like Motorcycles and not only that they are killer scale-model LEGO bikes that we thought you guys would be interested in. While there are officially licensed LEGO motorcycle kits—there’s a killer Technic kit of BMW’s R 1200 GS Adventure for example—the examples I’m talking about today were made simply by the builders dipping their hands into their collection of bricks and clicking pieces together until a motorcycle appeared. Like a sculptor knocking off bits of stone until the naked woman inside is revealed. Let’s check ’em out, shall we?

Harley-Davidson Cali-Style Lowrider

lego
Looks ready to ride away

This vision in green was built by a Dutchman who goes by the handle Bricksonwheels. Apparently a huge gearhead, their interests include semi-trucks, trains, and motorcycles. Based on a late-model  Harley-Davidson Road King, this model is a massive 1:10 scale and is made from standard bricks and some custom chromed parts. The attention to detail here is stunning. No word on how long it took Bricksonwheels to build this thing, but I assume—much like Rome—it wasn’t built in a day.

lego

The running gear looks fantastic with all the chromed and gold-plated parts.

lego

To give you an idea of the size of this thing, those pushrod towers are about 1.5 inches long.

BMW R60

lego
LEGO fit for a Beemer rider

The work of a Taiwanese kid named Maxime Cheng, this classic BMW is a fantastic piece of modeling. Despite apparently being 12 years old, Cheng has definitely captured the essence of a bike that was probably built before his grandfather was born. From the stout boxer engine to the plunger rear suspension to the bar-end turn signals, juicy Beemer-specific details abound here. He even built a sidecar for it! There are more pictures in Cheng’s R60 album you should definitely check out.

lego
This Nearly foot tall first order Storm Trooper gives you the size of Chengs R60
lego
Close up of the rear suspension
The sidecar really completes the look
lego
it even comes with a tool kit

Junak M10

lego
Just a handful of old bricks and a good imagination can get you this

SFM Junak made the only four-stroke bikes produced in Poland between World War II and the Revolutions of 1989. Despite being in production only a scant nine years—1956 to 1965—the company made scads of bikes powered by a rugged, unit constructed, 350cc, 19 horsepower single mated to a four-speed transmission. This simple LEGO version of the M10 proves that you don’t have to have thousands of bricks to make a cool bike model. Only about four inches long, the tiny mighty M10 was made by a modeler called Jerrec. It’s pretty much all basic LEGO bricks, and even has some pretty clever solutions to problems caused by a lack of specialist parts. For example, the fenders are made from 1×1 tiles held together by black stickers. See? Even you can make a rad little bike model with what you have laying around.

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That sidecar looks especially roomy, doesn’t it?
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And here it is without the sidecar, check out the great little details that the engine and the drivetrain have.

1957 Harley-Davidson Sportster

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Spirit of the OG Sportster captured in LEGO

Another Maxime Cheng joint, this LEGO Sportster is fantastic. A faithful reproduction of the first generation Harley-Davidson Sportster, this model has it all. Cheng’s attention to detail really shines through in the red and black tank, the corrugated header pipes, the kickstarter, the sprung seat, and even the big horn under the air cleaner. Unfortunately, the wheels kind of ruin the rest of the bike’s 50s aesthetic, but since there aren’t any LEGO wire wheels, Cheng did the best he could. Check out the rest of the build here.

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A clearer look at the LEGO Sporty. the headlight and wheels are a bit modern, but the rest is on point.
Everywhere you look on this model are great period-correct details.
That is a wheel and rubber tire doing duty as a fuel tank cap
Cheng definitely did his research on this one.

Kaneda’s Motorcycle

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Last but not least is this amazing remote-controlled model of the iconic bike from Akira. Built by ace LEGO builder Sariel, it’s equipped with electric motors and controllers from the LEGO Technic collection. The Technic motors allow the model to drive and steer on solid surfaces. While it looks a little stubby and out of scale in the images, it’s still a really cool piece of engineering. You can read about the build at Sariel’s site.

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a look at the model’s guts showing the technic motors
the decals were custom made for this project
here it is nearly complete

So there you have it. It’s interesting to see how geeks in other hobbies interpret what we do in ours. Now, if you’ll excuse us, we here at AMERiders are going to have some playtime and dig out our LEGO bricks and see what we can come up with.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with Fantastic Custom Bikes Built by These Lego Geniuses Are Too Cool.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.

Photos courtesy of their respective model builders

Who Wouldn’t Want a 2019 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy Made out of Legos? I do.

Do you want your very own 2019 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy well you can for the great price of $99.99? Before you jump for joy at that low price, let me tell you that you’re not going to be able to ride it. Yeah, I know your heart just sank into the floor, but let me raise your spirits back up. You can get one for that price brand new, and it’s perfect as long as you don’t mind it being made of tiny plastic blocks from Denmark.

That’s right, everyone’s favorite Danish interlocking brick system has teamed up with Harley-Davidson to bring an officially licensed Fat Boy to all the AFOL nerds LEGO lovers out there. Part of the LEGO Creator Expert line, the LEGO Fat Boy is about 12 inches long and made up of 1,023 pieces. While the model is packed with a ton of awesome little details—working steering, brake and shifter levers, replica tank-top speedometer, etc.—that show off both Harley’s distinct design language and LEGO’s versatility, the real story here is the model’s engine.

Packed into the plastic frame is a tiny Milwaukee Eight with moving internals that is connected via chain and sprocket to the rear wheel. When you roll the model along, on its tiny trademark Fat Boy dish wheels, the action actually moves the pistons inside the engine. It is, in a word, rad.

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Now that is fantastic attention to detail

By all accounts, the brains at LEGO HQ were pretty excited to work with The Motor Company on this project.

“Bringing this Harley-Davidson motorcycle to life in brick form is incredibly exciting,” said LEGO Design Master (how’s that for a job title?) Mike Psiaki. “The model truly captures the iconic design, advanced engineering and attention to detail of this iconic motorcycle, offering an immersive building experience and a unique collector’s item for Harley-Davidson enthusiasts and LEGO fans of all ages.”

Sounds like Harley was pretty stoked to be working with LEGO, too.

“It’s been exceptionally exciting for Harley-Davidson to collaborate with the LEGO Group—another
brand that champions creativity and expression,” said Harley’s Chief Marketing Officer Heather Malenshek. “Not only do we want customers to be inspired by the end result, we want them to enjoy the building process.”

As if building a cool LEGO Harley model for all the LEGO fanatics out there, LEGO Master Builders (yes, it’s A Thing) put together a life-sized Fat Boy made entirely of bricks to celebrate the model’s launch. This massive sculpture is made from nearly 70,000 bricks—6,000 of which were custom-designed for the project—and took 865 hours to build. It has special silver-plated parts to mimic the Fat Boy’s roughly nine miles of chrome, WI-FI animation control (whatever that is), and a suite of sound and light effects that give the illusion of a real working, riding motorcycle. LEGO plans to ship the life-sized LEGO Fat Boy around the country to various LEGO stores and Harley events to show it off. ( I really want to see it close up and personal.)

The LEGO Creator Expert Fat Boy model will run you a cool $99.99 in Yankee Dollars and goes on sale August 1, 2019 (July 17, 2019, for VIP members). The model will be available at LEGO’s retail website, at Harley-Davidson.com, and at Harley dealers across the country. 

Ok, I don’t know about you but I want one of those Super Cool little suckers. Heck, who am I kidding I am gonna have to have two because I don’t want to have to share my playing with it with my husband. LoL, am I right people? Heck, I really wanna work at Lego too.

~And as always…

~Live Free Ride Hard~

Mistakes

~AMERiders

and

Let AMERiders keep you up to date with information on the 2019 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy Made out of Legos.

And as always don’t forget to send us your stories, pictures, and events for posting to GALLERY.AMERIDERS @ GMAIL.COM  and we will post them for you. The more people that know about your event the better and we are offering free advertising. We would also love to hear about your rides and love to see those bikes so send those stories and pictures.

Like what you just read? Share it on social media ( Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram) with others and let them get the information and benefit from it as well.